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View AKSteve's profile

Padauk Sucks!

by AKSteve
posted 09-10-2012 01:22 AM


39 replies so far

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

4277 posts in 3194 days


#1 posted 09-10-2012 01:28 AM

Steve

All the Paduak I have used has all been with power tools. I have used it for turning on a lathe and for boxes never used hand tools with it before. It is one of my favorite woods for adding color to a project.

If you do not want it sell it to me.
Arlin

-- It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

10062 posts in 2925 days


#2 posted 09-10-2012 01:32 AM

I’ve used Padauk twice before. I really like it. But by the time I was done it looked like I had been eating Cheeto’s and wiping my hands on my shorts… To me, it seemed really granular grain. By that I mean it was prone to chipping out, and once you got to the end of a cut you had to be very careful not to break a chunk out.

I do think it’s a very beautiful wood though.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View knotheadswoodshed's profile

knotheadswoodshed

225 posts in 2805 days


#3 posted 09-10-2012 01:35 AM

aside from the orange dust, I love paduak…and so do my customers.
My Paduak boxes are one of my biggest sellers

-- Randy - "I dont make mistakes, I make design change opportunities" www.knotheadswoodshed.com

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

7085 posts in 3231 days


#4 posted 09-10-2012 01:39 AM

Yeah, I like it too. The dust is a mess but, as mentioned, it adds beauty and color to projects. I just wish it was cheaper, so I could buy more!

View Ryan Haasen's profile

Ryan Haasen

385 posts in 3033 days


#5 posted 09-10-2012 01:53 AM

I love the smell and look of Padauk. The only thing I don’t like about it is the colour fades to (almost) brown over time. I wish it held its colour.

-- Ryan

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1907 posts in 2816 days


#6 posted 09-10-2012 01:57 AM

I worked padauk with hand tools, and while it was definitely hard, I actually enjoyed working with it. I took a rough 8/4 plank down to dimensions only with hand planes, starting with a scrub plane.

I agree on the red dust. That was annoying. But apart from that, I just love the color and definitely will work with it again.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View lj61673's profile

lj61673

265 posts in 3032 days


#7 posted 09-10-2012 11:22 AM

Welcome to the world of exotic woods…either love them or hate them.
Padauk can suck big time is you get one of those funky multi grain direction pieces.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5251 posts in 4593 days


#8 posted 09-10-2012 01:01 PM

And it get all over the walls when ya sand, but it SHORE PURDY.
Bill

-- [email protected]

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3263 posts in 3308 days


#9 posted 09-10-2012 02:55 PM

I used some and made a checker board for my grandson. I thought it was beautiful. I machine everything though.
The dust is no worse than any other wood except you can see this because of the great color. The other dust is there too, we just don’t see it.
You might hook a dust collector to that plane….LOL

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11856 posts in 4320 days


#10 posted 09-10-2012 03:12 PM

I love it as an accent wood , but haven’t made anything large with it yet. I understand that it turns brownish with time , and I don’t know of a finish to stop that from happening yet.
What do you plan on using for a finish ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5251 posts in 4593 days


#11 posted 09-10-2012 03:25 PM

I have used HUT WAX on padauk turnings with great results. I find that the color becomes a deep maroon with time.
Bill

-- [email protected]

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11856 posts in 4320 days


#12 posted 09-10-2012 03:43 PM

Thanks Bill.
I am looking for something to keep the “orange” color intact.
I also used some wax along with mineral oil on a cutting board with Padauk in it and it totally changed the whole look of the board . The Padauk kept getting darker as time went on and ruined my original “thoughts” as how I wanted it to look.
I don’t know if it was the wax that possibly caused it because I’ve used just plain Mineral Oil on previous boards with no acute color changes. The edge board is the Padauk I was referring to.

and these are just plain mineral oil.Still holding their colors : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View AKSteve's profile

AKSteve

475 posts in 2936 days


#13 posted 09-10-2012 03:52 PM

Don’t get me wrong it is a beautiful wood, one of the main reasons I picked it to go with Maple, it just stands out so nicely. But I am definitely going to have to machine it. I was going to put BLO on it for finish, and paste wax for finish. not sure yet though. I would like to try to retain the color if I could. Bill thanks for the tip I will probably give that a try and see.

-- Steve - Wasilla, Alaska

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

4277 posts in 3194 days


#14 posted 09-11-2012 12:26 AM

For helping with color fastness on woods, I have been using Deft Danish Oil with UV inhibitors in it. So far so good the last 3 years with purple heart and paduak.

Arlin

-- It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 3555 days


#15 posted 09-11-2012 12:36 AM

That’s a good tip Arlin,thanks.

-- Life is good.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11856 posts in 4320 days


#16 posted 09-11-2012 05:56 AM

Thank you , Arlin : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View IsaacH's profile

IsaacH

128 posts in 2729 days


#17 posted 09-11-2012 06:33 AM

Watch that dust….gives me a killer headache if I turn it without a respirator….not to mention the purple boogers…..ewwwww

:-P

-- Isaac- Decatur, GA - "Your woodworking....NOT machining parts for NASA!!!"

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3389 posts in 2806 days


#18 posted 09-11-2012 02:13 PM

Whoa! Padauk is my favorite wood too! Best results when finished!

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8815 posts in 3209 days


#19 posted 09-11-2012 02:15 PM

Thanks Arlin

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 3707 days


#20 posted 09-11-2012 02:51 PM

Padauk is eventually going to turn dark and brown and dull. You can slow it down but you cannot stop it. The same is true of purpleheart and a few other of the colorful exotics.

When it comes to colorful exotics, the only one that I am confident that it will keep its color is bloodwood.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1123 posts in 3758 days


#21 posted 09-13-2012 02:27 PM

Hey Steve, one of my mantras: if you know the tree you know the wood. Paduak, if you are using Pterocarpus soyauxii is from Africa where unlike up here in the temperate zones these trees grow in wet/dry seasons… not growth/dormant seasons…. most trees that grow in wet/dry have alternating and interlaced grain… meaning during the wet season it grows one way… dry it grows the other way. The Parenchyma cells are tiny and everywhere because (depending on the tree’s nature) there it needs more time to hold what nutrients and water they can get. Here in the temperate zones we have distinct growth rings where the tree makes open (and more) cells for growth and then more condensed cells when it gets colder… most evident in Ash trees. Thus Parenchyma cells are more pronounced because they have to hold more nutrients and water, but for a shorter time… like in Sycamore trees and the rays found in White Oak. (Parenchyma = “functioning tissue organ” and are most found in Angiosperms a later evolution from the Gymnosperms)... interlocking grain is great for carving, but can occasionally be a PITA. :)

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2202 posts in 3791 days


#22 posted 09-13-2012 02:44 PM

Eric…I want your brain…at least the knowledge you have about trees! Maybe someday I’ll have the chance to really study it.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View AKSteve's profile

AKSteve

475 posts in 2936 days


#23 posted 09-13-2012 03:07 PM

thanks for the information! very enlightening for sure. what is a good source for the information you talk about? are there any really good books I could read, I would love to know more about it.

-- Steve - Wasilla, Alaska

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1123 posts in 3758 days


#24 posted 09-14-2012 09:08 PM

I highly recommend “The Tree” by Colin Tudge. not exactly a light read, but truly interesting. I read it three times just to absorb a portion of the info.. then I reinforce what I learn by reading on-line and other woodworking books about history (e.g. What wood is That?”) and ecology books. I get most of my info of South American trees from a rare book called “Soils of the Amazon”. When I study a tree species I usually do it for a few weeks…and I am not into academia anymore… so it is all for my own fun and knowledge. I just finished Yellowheart… fascinating. But keep in mind my hobbies are Physics, Forest Biology, and cultural psychology… used to be woodworking and painting… but that is my job now.. so my free time is all about reading and relaxing.

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/1945

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View Dustmite97's profile

Dustmite97

439 posts in 3853 days


#25 posted 09-14-2012 09:33 PM

I’ve got to use padauk a few times. It’s a really nice wood especially with a nice finish on it. It is pretty solid wood but hasn’t been too difficult to machine. I hear you about the dust though, especially when sanding.

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1123 posts in 3758 days


#26 posted 09-15-2012 10:06 PM

I just realized I wrote above “what wood is that?”...which is a great book, but I meant “Know your wood.”
Yes, funny title.. but it is a great way to learn some facts about wood from around the world. I have no idea if it is in print, I got mine from my father. For example.. Mahogany was not imported into America during a short period.. off my head… about 1910-1915.. my condo was built in 1915.. so when looking at historical rehab.. i instead discovered the place was stained Birch to look Mahogany and was low income worker homes with small coal fire places.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View 47phord's profile

47phord

182 posts in 2870 days


#27 posted 09-15-2012 10:37 PM

I just made an anniversary gift for my wife out of Paduak. It was my first time using it but I thought it was fairly easy to work with. I’m guessing AKSteve just got a crummy chunk of the stuff. As for finishing my project, I followed several recommendations and used a clear spar finish, which blocks UV rays and protects that lovely color (supposedly).

View pashley's profile

pashley

1044 posts in 4350 days


#28 posted 09-16-2012 01:25 AM

I work with it all the time. Some points:

• If you can use a card scraper or plane, do it; avoid sanding.

• If you sand, wear a mask, or at the very least, use a good air cleaner; that dust is toxic.

• Before finishing, take some denatured alcohol on a rag, and wipe off the paduak really well. Failing to do so will cause that orange dust to be picked up by the brush, and will carry over to your neighboring wood, and it’s very hard to remove after that. Better yet, finish the paduak before assembly.

-- Have a blessed day! http://newmissionworkshop.com

View AKSteve's profile

AKSteve

475 posts in 2936 days


#29 posted 09-16-2012 04:10 AM

Very Good tips Pashley, you not kidding about that dust, it’s like orange Kool Aid ! it gets on everything, I definitely wear a mask, I can’t stand to have any dust up my nose! I fashioned a taper jig today and cut out the legs that I wanted on the Table saw, I put my Rigid wet/dry vac on the exhaust but it still gets every where, I also put a exhaust filter on the vac too. here is a picture of the legs for the table I am making:

-- Steve - Wasilla, Alaska

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11856 posts in 4320 days


#30 posted 09-16-2012 04:11 AM

I want to see that table when finished : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 3417 days


#31 posted 09-19-2012 01:37 AM

You are right…it sucks. It’s dusty and porous as was mentioned above. Orange everywhere!
I had a pen blank of it that I never did get around to turning. This is one of the blanks turned down and sanded to 320. I then wiped it off with just a dry cloth. It seems to have the same kind of open cells as wenge, but not as bad. I’ll have to use a few coats of thick CA before the thin final coats but it should look good.
I wonder what it would look like if I used compressed air to clean out the pores and filled them in with some yellowheart?

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7522 posts in 4000 days


#32 posted 09-19-2012 04:08 AM

Last time I used Padauk my router base looked as if the had rusted and it is plastic. I only use it for decorative accents because it’s messy and not cheap!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View picofarads's profile

picofarads

44 posts in 820 days


#33 posted 12-01-2017 12:41 PM

What pashley said is absolutely right. That dust is so fine you have to make certain you get all of it off if you sand it. If you don’t get every molecule off it will ‘bleed’ over to whatever you have it joined to. And, generally, that’s a light colored wood like maple. IMO maple doesn’t look great with a pinkish orange hue. Also, I have had experience with the multi-direction grain in padauk. After running it though the planer it looks like it has holes in it no matter which direction you feed it through. Card scraper is the only thing that helps. Plus you have to really seal it with something before applying the final finish or it will look blotchy. At least mine did.

-- An open mind is apt to let anything in....or out!

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 2253 days


#34 posted 12-01-2017 06:30 PM

As far as working with red wood goes, Padauk is the gentle, doting grandmother compared to the meth addicted old hag that is Bloodwood. I suggest working with Bloodwood for a little while and then the Padauk will seem dreamy. Plus I love the way Padauk smells.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 2102 days


#35 posted 12-01-2017 07:31 PM



As far as working with red wood goes, Padauk is the gentle, doting grandmother compared to the meth addicted old hag that is Bloodwood. I suggest working with Bloodwood for a little while and then the Padauk will seem dreamy. Plus I love the way Padauk smells.

- LiveEdge

I didn’t mind working with Bloodwood, EXCEPT that it’s so hard it splits / splinters like crazy.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5538 posts in 2942 days


#36 posted 12-01-2017 07:54 PM

Freshly cut Padauk

Padauk after it darkens

Red Oak on the Janka scale is 1290
Padauk …...........................1725
Bloodwood…........................2900

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

600 posts in 2253 days


#37 posted 12-01-2017 10:13 PM

Wow. That oak really darkened too!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5538 posts in 2942 days


#38 posted 12-01-2017 10:34 PM

The first picture was taken in my shop without any finish on it. The second picture was taken at the owners house some month later with oil based finish on it and different lighting. Internet picture aren’t always the best. I have two computers and these picture will look a bit different on each one.

Anyway to point is Padauk over time with lose the orange and turn a dark reddish color.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5538 posts in 2942 days


#39 posted 12-02-2017 08:35 AM

Blood wood dust

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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