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Show the restoration before and after.

by Don W
posted 03-11-2012 11:38 PM


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View woodcox's profile

woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4451 posted 02-20-2015 09:33 PM

Thanks for the info on everything Tim! I’ll have to check wire specs again. I’ve read a little about wire winding for them here,http://www.bob-easton.com/blog/2009/807/. A lot of talk about it in the comments as well,which led the OP to do another specific entry about it later on. Stanley used sell a spring and jaw kit for their push drills that were a good fit but discontinued them. Many just use the right guitar strings wound around a drill bit, trial and error I gather with spacing being particular. Winding under tension with a lathe sounded most feasible.

Dude is the plunger to keep the magazine cap closed. Magazine is numbered 0-8 for the bits,0 being his hole. Sellers want like 70 bucks for a complete set of them!

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Tim

3859 posts in 2596 days


#4452 posted 02-21-2015 01:46 AM

That’s a pretty cool drill magazine. Haven’t seen one of those on a drill before.

Thanks for that link too. It’s very detailed especially in the comments and while winding your own springs may not be easy, it does seem possible with some practice.

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1590 posts in 4199 days


#4453 posted 02-21-2015 02:14 AM

Another Millers Falls No. 14.

I have to admit, I did not think this was going to clean up very well.

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View Slyy's profile

Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4454 posted 02-21-2015 03:32 AM

WC – that’s gonna be a fun restore! I’ve had zero luck finding egg eaters (other than $70 late crafstman kind) around my parts, been thinking about turning to the bay. Update pics will be fun to see soon! For ERA I think it only attacks Fe2O3 and magnesium. Most other corrosion resistant metals have too strong a bind for the chelating agent to do anything to.

Tim nice MF! I only find them sparingly around here but I really like the look and design of them. That’s a nice looking example.

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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theoldfart

11124 posts in 3085 days


#4455 posted 02-21-2015 03:38 AM

Jake, maybe I can help with the egg “eater” drought. PM me with your needs.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4456 posted 02-21-2015 05:13 AM

This stuff seems to work pretty well too. It took more of the enamel and rust ER left behind. Don’t let it cook more than a couple of hours though, it’s kind of a sticky job removing it. ER did just ok, that pin was prolly the most corroded part and it came out still a little crusty after 12 or so hours. Maybe a longer soak next time.

Good luck with a beater Jake. There are a ton of em on ebay because they were in just about every home owner’s tool box back in the day. I was drawn to the GPs simply because of the wheel gear, gnarly looking. MF and North Bros seem to be the ish too. Look for steel or iron pre WWII, after that most are pot metal frames which could be ok too. I kept this page open in the back ground when browsing,http://oldtoolheaven.com/index.html. Great reference for quick identification straight from mfg. pics and descriptions. Downer I’ve found is the chucks have little easily lost or worn parts that may render it inoperable until sourced. May need more than one to put one into service. Careful though they are cheap and can accumulate quickly;) I have seven more GPs coming and four pending just to be on the safe side. Too early to tell but daddy may have issues. If Kev doesn’t hook you up and I can survive hiding the boxes I may have a couple to choose from too:)

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4457 posted 02-21-2015 09:13 AM

I just saw a your grandfather’s breast drill, very nice work Jake! I wish I had heirlooms like that to use, a few tie hacks and carpenters in my lineage but uncles currently have all their tools. As it should be though.

I’m now sure you know what your looking for but just info I found pertinent.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Michael smith

52 posts in 1840 days


#4458 posted 02-21-2015 11:12 AM

I agree on the before & after shots. I enjoy looking at them. Too bad I didn’t take any shots of my stanley # 4’s.
I did on the tenon saws. But can’t get pic here or on the gallery,
See my projects. I need help putting pictures here . ( computer skills very poor).
Awesome job every body thanks for the posts.

  • Take care of your tools and they will take care of you * unknown

-- Http://www.woodworkermike.com

View Slyy's profile

Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4459 posted 02-23-2015 12:45 AM

Grabbed this little guy a week ago for $6 at a new to me antique store.
Looks like a stanley 9 1/2 though only has two identification castings, one that looks like “Pat. 8-5-97” (though hard to be sure on first 2 numbers) and an “S” is cast into the adjustable mouth portion.
Some before:


Some of the after:


This was without touching the iron at all, so the dog still hunts even without my help. Once the iron is touched up it’ll be pretty good little plane!
Anyone have ideas on who and when it’s from?

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

View Don W's profile

Don W

19487 posts in 3202 days


#4460 posted 02-23-2015 12:59 AM

Jake, it could be a Stanley, it looks like a type 11,12 or13, that’s 1900 give or take a year or 2.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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Tim Dahn

1590 posts in 4199 days


#4461 posted 02-23-2015 01:29 AM

Looks great Jake.

Any markings on the iron?

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View woodcox's profile

woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4462 posted 02-23-2015 01:49 AM

Painting tonight, ugh.

Nice save Jake!

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4463 posted 02-23-2015 01:51 AM

Not one that showed up after cleaning Tim. I do have at least one other known Stanley block plane with no markings on the iron, pedigree might not be fully revealed but it’s a very functional plane, my first with this particular style of adjusting mechanism. Pretty impressed with how easy it is to adjust in in very small increments.

Edit:
WC – taping is my secret love affair. I hate doing it so much I secretly really love it. Satisfies the OCD in me like nothing. Sure does look great when you peel off to and see that great paint line!

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4464 posted 02-23-2015 02:26 AM

Speaking of which, this is engine enamel. Can says it can be handled in an hour. Should I remove tape then or wait some more?

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Airframer

3043 posts in 2587 days


#4465 posted 02-23-2015 02:32 AM

Let it cure over night before touching. Nothing worse than getting a slight finger print on new paint just to peel some tape. It should peel clean in the morning.

-- Eric - "I'm getting proficient with these hand jobbers. - BigRedKnothead"

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lateralus819

2243 posts in 2524 days


#4466 posted 02-23-2015 02:32 AM

It is usually easier to remove tape as soon as it can be. Sometimes it can get really stuck and take forever to remove. But dont want to do it so soon as it peels the paint.

Enamel usually dries quite fast. Usually to the touch in 20 minutes.

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Airframer

3043 posts in 2587 days


#4467 posted 02-23-2015 02:34 AM

unjammy

-- Eric - "I'm getting proficient with these hand jobbers. - BigRedKnothead"

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CFrye

10851 posts in 2474 days


#4468 posted 02-23-2015 02:52 AM

Nice job, Jake! How badly was the moveable mouth to free up?

-- God bless, Candy

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Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4469 posted 02-23-2015 03:07 AM

Candy – it was locked up. Just hit it with some PB Blaster and let that hang out overnight. It was sitting pretty open and proud to the front when I got it so after letting it sit, grabbed my big whacker I got from Mos in the last mallet swap and put a nice soft peice of pine in between and gave it a few good smacks. Then I could easily push it out though the adjustment screw hole with a drift. I’ll be honest though: hitting cast always makes me a bit nervous.

WC – I’m with Lat on the tape. I’ll usually pull it off after about 3 hours when using the enamel paints. Though I will typically set small pieces in front of my shop heater for that time as well to promote some quicker dry times. Haven’t experienced but I worry waiting too long might result in incomplete tape removal or unintentional removal of some finish.

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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Dan Krager

4510 posts in 2868 days


#4470 posted 02-23-2015 12:33 PM

Slyy, I can relate to questions about tape removal. Painter’s tapes have gotten much better than some of the old masking tapes. You can actually buy tape based on how long you intend to leave it in place, and I think it is color coded. I’m also impressed by the much cleaner lines left by the tape edge.
If the paint is thick and covers the edge of the tape (and it usually does, else why tape?) there is always a risk of the paint bond wrecking the clean edge. If there is any doubt, I take a razor knife and lightly score the paint following the edge of the tape by feel as much as possible. Really clean edges are possible without doubt.

If you should leave the tape on metal objects too long (weeks) then score for sure and you can clean up the tape residue with a small amount of paint thinner on a rag, and a light scraper. Or very fine steel wool staying off the new paint. Low heat (hair dryer or heat lamp) on the tape before removal softens the adhesive enough to ease consistent removal.

My most reliable success has been to pull the tape immediately after the last coat while it is still wet.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

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JayT

6384 posts in 2845 days


#4471 posted 02-23-2015 01:35 PM

A little late, but I pull tape while the paint is still a bit wet, too—it leaves a clean line that way. If you wait until the paint is dry, you run the risk of lifting some of what you wanted to save.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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Combo Prof

4039 posts in 1912 days


#4472 posted 02-25-2015 11:33 PM

Question

I have a type 2 Stanley router plane with only one blade (see below) it works great, but its impossible to find more blades for it. So I thought I’d buy the set of 5 imperial blades that Lee Valley sells. They claim these will fit a Stanley 71. Well it must be that they only fit the latter model Stanley 71s, because they don’t fit mine. The square post of the blades are 0.8mm too wide in both axis. So here is my question. Should I return them or should I try to file them down to fit? If so please add some advice on how to do the filing. I’m thinking to only file the back two edges with a bastard file, perhaps using some sort of depth stop to prevent over filing.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

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Tim

3859 posts in 2596 days


#4473 posted 02-26-2015 12:24 AM

I don’t know how they harden them, but if the whole thing is hardened tool steel a file isn’t going to do much. A grinder is better for tool steel in general. I would probably grind a little then check with a caliper to see how close I was getting and repeat. I don’t have a 71 though, is it depending on a snug fit on the sides, or is it the 90 degree angle on the front that holds the blade straight? If the latter, you don’t have to be quite as careful with the grinding.

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Combo Prof

4039 posts in 1912 days


#4474 posted 02-26-2015 12:37 AM

There is a 90 degree angle in the front and also in the back that holds the blade straight. The sides don’t even touch the blade post. It was surprising to me that the post is not exactly square. Neither mine nor the Lee-Valley blade posts are square. Only a small 0.5 mm difference though. Disappointed I cannot use a file. I do have a grinding wheel but I am no expert. I only use to refurbish the bevel on old planes and chisels. Wouldn’t a wheel hollow grind the posts. Would that be an issue? I suppose to use a file I would first heat up the tool with a torch to soften the metal.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

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Tim

3859 posts in 2596 days


#4475 posted 02-26-2015 01:05 AM

I’m not saying you can’t file it, but it’s possible. Yeah a grinder would hollow grind it if you just pressed the center on, but if you hold it square and take passes back and forth and check it as you go it’s not too hard to get used to grinding. You’ll probably do fine if you try it, but if you don’t want to mess with your LV blades then practice on some scrap like a old hex key or whatever.

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Combo Prof

4039 posts in 1912 days


#4476 posted 02-26-2015 03:37 PM

I asked Lee Valley about the steel in their router plane blades and they contacted Veritas. The response is:

We have heard from Veritas and they have stated the following:
The shaft is AISI C12L14 which is a high carbon steel. It is not hardened and should grind or file with no problems.

In fact they tried it, my Lee Valley service contacts writes about his Veritas contact:

And since I sent this one [last e-mail], my contact tried it with a file and it was very easy so this sound very doable. Here was his comments

I also have one of these shafts at my desk and I tried a file on it and it files pretty easy.

So I guess this is good news, in that I can easily diminish the blades with a file to make them fit.

I might also add that Lee Valley said they would take them back or exchange them for “narrower blades” that they might find looking through their stock, because of +/- tolerances in manufacture. I think this is outstanding service. I am very impressed with Lee Valley.

-- Don K, (Holland, Michigan)

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terryR

7577 posts in 2943 days


#4477 posted 02-26-2015 03:50 PM

That’s awesome to hear, DonK.
Thanks for the footwork on this!
I’ve always wondered, too!

It makes sense that only the cutting edge has been heat treated…the shafts need to be softer to allow for screws to grab hold. FWIW, you could always heat hardened steel until orange, let it air cool, and it will be annealed, or softened. Just keep the heat away from the cutting edge.

+1 for LeeValley’s customer service!

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

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daddywoofdawg

1028 posts in 2209 days


#4478 posted 02-26-2015 04:37 PM

I’d send all but one back,keep one to try filing on just so you know;It could also be +/- on your tool too.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

10063 posts in 2926 days


#4479 posted 02-26-2015 05:52 PM

I’ve always had good experiences with Lee Valley customer support. I bought a set of the “parallel tip” screw drivers, and one of them broke (trying to loosen a screw on a handplane knob). I asked if it was possible to buy individual screw drivers (I only saw them for sale in the set). I explained what happened, and they asked which size, and sent me a replacement. I asked if they wanted me to send the broken one back and they said not to worry about it.

I plan to make an awl out of it, maybe.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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byerbyer

241 posts in 2607 days


#4480 posted 02-26-2015 08:21 PM

Disston D-8 Rip Saw. I started the rehab a month or so ago and finally got around to putting the new handle back on.

-- Byer-- "Comparison is the thief of joy" -- T.R. Roosevelt

View woodcox's profile

woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4481 posted 02-26-2015 10:15 PM

Goodell-Pratt no. 54


-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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theoldfart

11124 posts in 3085 days


#4482 posted 02-26-2015 10:17 PM

Wicked good restore WC.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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daddywoofdawg

1028 posts in 2209 days


#4483 posted 02-26-2015 10:38 PM

I’d lose that one little piece that holds everything else together.

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ToddJB

8590 posts in 2765 days


#4484 posted 02-26-2015 10:45 PM

Wow, looks great, WC

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

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Brad

1141 posts in 3374 days


#4485 posted 02-27-2015 12:13 AM

The catalog ties it all together. Cool stuff!

-- "People's lives are their own rewards or punishments."

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Don Broussard

3856 posts in 2886 days


#4486 posted 02-27-2015 12:20 AM

Great job on the restore, woodcut! Did you like the way the painted edges came out when you removed the painter’s tape? I’ll say the paint edges look good from here.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

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woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4487 posted 02-27-2015 01:34 AM

Thanks fellas, these are fun to do and there really isn’t that much to them. I have two or three more started already. Cox’s Beaters Co.:) Too bad the plating gets lost, they must have been really nice when new.

Crazy, they sold for about three to nine dollars and they list a simple scratch awl for $2.50.

Don, I pulled the tape after an hour or so. I’ll probably wait a little longer next time but yeah, it did work well. I did three coats in an hour. I may have to try a second round after the first has fully cured just for a goof. Prolly have to razor the line at that point though.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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ksSlim

1304 posts in 3524 days


#4488 posted 02-27-2015 01:47 AM

Super nice WC.
Painter friend told me, no less than 2 hrs. between coats.
He further said “best to wait 24 hrs. between coats”

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

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Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4489 posted 02-27-2015 01:52 AM

Dubbya that is a most excellent resto man! Saw your SOTS a post…. OUCH!

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4490 posted 02-27-2015 03:13 AM

Yeah, definitely a downer to see it come out of the box in pieces. A lot of history gone because of carelessness. V

A least I got my money back. I want to tear it down and see if it can be retrofitted with common gear. That has a ratchet feature incorporated into the handle. Though a no. 5 gear is very similar on the outside.

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4491 posted 02-27-2015 03:26 AM

Could still be braised perhaps? Have a couple breast drills that were braised by somone in a previous life, and unfortunately an early No11 breast drill that needs the same thanks to my carelessness.

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4492 posted 03-03-2015 04:22 AM

For perusal a Disston No. 4 backsaw I picked up a while back. The blade is pitted quite a bit though not deeply, alas no etch was present after the long history of rust. She got a nice sharpening for our resident Master Sawyer Summerfi.

Before

And the after

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

View Dan Krager's profile

Dan Krager

4510 posts in 2868 days


#4493 posted 03-03-2015 12:27 PM

WC, those are superlative restores. Looks like they’re ready to “go to meetin’ ”.

I’ve heard of people who do custom casting. Since you have the original parts, the mold would be easy. I’ve also heard it’s not very expensive that way. I wish I could give you a lead, but I just can’t remember where I read about that. Maybe a metal working forum someplace. You might be able to get your money back if you did several for sale.

DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com All my life I've wanted to be someone. I see now I should have been more specific.

View Michael smith's profile

Michael smith

52 posts in 1840 days


#4494 posted 03-03-2015 01:01 PM

I was surfing the web for help with my back saws and found this web site.
TIAS.com Great Expectations Antiques.
From the home page, on the column on the left click on ( tools) then pick woodworking.
I found lots of woodworking tools. I enjoyed looking at it hope you will!
It was informative for me.

Mike.

-- Http://www.woodworkermike.com

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daddywoofdawg

1028 posts in 2209 days


#4495 posted 03-03-2015 04:25 PM

there might proud of there tools!

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BigRedKnothead

8553 posts in 2616 days


#4496 posted 03-03-2015 04:48 PM

^Ya, antique tool dealer/flipper guys have different priorities than woodworker.

-- "At the end of the day, try and make it beautiful....because the world is full of ugly." Konrad Sauer

View woodcox's profile

woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4497 posted 03-04-2015 05:56 AM

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

View Slyy's profile

Slyy

2840 posts in 2290 days


#4498 posted 03-04-2015 08:41 PM

Nice little machinists square Dubbya!

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

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woodcox

2386 posts in 2646 days


#4499 posted 03-05-2015 05:51 AM

G P awl and driver, the wood on the awl is really dry and beat up. I thought about trying to rehandle it but I’m not sure I could do it without damaging the ferrule. I may give it a try if it degrades anymore. I would think the ferrule is just a friction fit, pounded together when in production. I think the top of the driver was supposed to be domed originally. It too may get new wood if the traces of the paint “finish” in the pores gets to bothering me. Maybe after regular oil application and use it may fade some. For these I just card scraped and light sanded the gunk away with out taking too much. Both are much better than before and I am happy to have them at the ready. Painted finish, what were they thinking! Although, it kept the wood safe for the last century or so to find me:)

Edit: Is the difference between an awl and a scribe the striking cap?idk

-- "My god has more wood than your god" ... G. Carlin.

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Woodknack

13059 posts in 3014 days


#4500 posted 03-05-2015 07:04 AM

You could try soaking the handle in linseed oil. It’s not a cure-all but I’ve had luck rejuvenating old dried out handles. You need bare wood, preferably end grain so it will pull oil all the way through.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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