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Post Your Stanley # 78 Comments Here!

by poopiekat
posted 02-19-2012 05:14 PM


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111 replies

111 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

7085 posts in 3660 days


#1 posted 02-19-2012 05:44 PM

I have a couple of the variations, Sargent, Craftsman, and Miller Falls. And none of them are complete! When looking to buy one, make sure its complete. The original parts can cost as much as the plane. However parts can be bought new off the web as well.

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poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#2 posted 02-19-2012 05:52 PM

Thanks, Shane!
I wonder if anyone considers this plane to be their go-to tool. You’re correct about making sure the fence and depth stop are present if buying one. Seems like those two items are listed as often as the planes themselves, often priced higher than 78s themselves, without those two accessories. I’ll sometimes buy junky 78s for a few bucks just to scavenge the spurs, which are hard to find but fit my Stanley 45s perfectly.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Dragonsrite's profile

Dragonsrite

136 posts in 4458 days


#3 posted 02-19-2012 05:57 PM

I picked up one of the 78s last summer for $20-ish at an antique shop. I finally came across a “need” for it last week – either drag the router table into the basement for one 22” rabbet, or use the plane. So I gave the plane a real quick tune-up; just sharpened up the scribe & iron and wax the body surfaces.

I must say that I really enjoyed using this plane. It did a fine job of creating the rabbet and was very easy to use. Mine is missing the depth … foot… or whatever you call it, so I had to really watch how deep I was going.

I agree that some iron adjustments would be nice, both height & lateral. Haven’t had a need to try the front mount yet.

-- Dragonsrite, Minnesota

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poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#4 posted 02-19-2012 06:21 PM

Thanks, Dragonsrite! Good to know there are positive experiences to be had with this plane! Better yet, perhaps we have another ‘Convert’, someone who had a good experience with a hand plane as an alternative to a power tool. Good story, thanks for sharing!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7166 posts in 4213 days


#5 posted 02-19-2012 06:29 PM

Great idea posting one topic per plane!

I have the craftsman version and it is very tricky to get set up right. The nicker was proud of the side and had to be ground down, the side was not flat so it was important that the blade is in line with the nicker rather than the side of the plane.

Also it is very tricky to adjust the blade depth. You have to tap it down into position but if you go too far there is no way to tap the back of the plane to back out the blade like in a wooden plane. You have to pull it back out and start over again.

Also the bed on the craftsman is not flat it has a little elevated piece at the front of the blade that I had to file down.

But I got it for $15 bucks complete and it is set up now ready for the next rabbet I have to cut.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4381 posts in 4013 days


#6 posted 02-19-2012 06:30 PM

I have the Craftsman version with the little horn at the front for a place to hold the plane, it’s definitely an improvement over the regular Stanley. The nicker/spur is the circular one you mentioned, but it doesn’t sit well in the bed and is virtually useless. Without the nicker, it is terrible at cross grain cuts and does okay work at rebates with the grain. I hardly use it.

The Stanley and Craftsman parts are interchangable. I purchased a new Stanley fence for mine from Highland and it fits perfectly.

If someone is really interested in this plane, I’d recommend purchasing the English version made by Woden, which seems to have some nice upgrades from the usual Stanley version.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7166 posts in 4213 days


#7 posted 02-19-2012 06:32 PM

Ah, and this thread would not be complete without a link to Smitty’s Skill Builder on using the 78 to raise a panel!
http://lumberjocks.com/Smitty_Cabinetshop/blog/24504

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#8 posted 02-19-2012 06:56 PM

Okay, I’ve gotta admit I’ve not even been paying attention to my own planes… or does itt mean I simply have too many of ‘em? Nahhh!!! So I went to get my 78s out, and lo and behold: Yes, height adjusting levers DO exist on some of these planes! I misspoke about this earlier. Photobucket On the left, a Stanley 78, with a height adjuster on the rear cutter bed! Next to it, a couple of ‘USA’ 78s probably knockoffs, both with spur cutters. Note the ‘horn’ on one of ‘em. And, in picture #2: Photobucket A Sears Craftsman 78 in the box, with a height adjuster lever and circular scribe cutter! Alas, no horn! I think I have more, but probably in my future garage-sale stash outside. Thanks for looking, and all of the great comments! I remember now, not being able to combine the best of the best into one custom 78 that had all features. I like having a horn on front, lever height adjuster, filled handle, etc. Definitely going to check out that panel-raising post as Mauricio suggested. Keep the comments coming, and thanks everyone!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View racerglen's profile

racerglen

3112 posts in 3842 days


#9 posted 02-19-2012 07:23 PM

[Poopie I have a Canadian Stanley ‘78..works just fine, has the lever adjustment for blade depth,
and like you I’ve never triedthe BULLnose position…..

;-)

-- Glen, B.C. Canada

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17302 posts in 3680 days


#10 posted 02-19-2012 08:12 PM

Thanks for posting the link, Mauricio. Yep, I’m a fan of the #78, and I’m actually wrapping up using it today to narrow some floating panels for use in a headboard frame and panel build.

The blade depth adjuster on the Stanley #78 (later) models makes it painless to use the tool effectively. Wax helps alot, too.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#11 posted 02-19-2012 09:27 PM

Smitty, I was glad to see the link to your panel-raising technique using a #78. Are you freehanding the angle? I never would have thought of a 78, or ANY rabbet plane, to do a mortise. I’ve always just used a 4 1/2 and followed up with a 9 1/2. Still, a fascinating method, thanks for posting it!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17302 posts in 3680 days


#12 posted 02-20-2012 01:22 AM

The panels I’ve done are backsides of a headboard and drawer bottoms, so freehand worked great. Glad you liked the post, and thanks for giving the ‘venerable’ #78 it’s due with it’s very own thread!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#13 posted 02-20-2012 03:07 AM

Thanks again, Smitty! I’m thinking of a way to perhaps devise a jig of some sort to achieve a taper such as your raised panels. I’ll try freehand first of course, perhaps some sort of skate that will ensure a consistent angle and depth. Again, thanks!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17302 posts in 3680 days


#14 posted 02-20-2012 03:47 AM

It is a different way to work, setting a fine cut and then shaving to the edge and face gauge lines. I hope when you give it a try that you’re freed of a jig mindset. Only reason I say this is because it is liberating to have such fine control with a tool while using it. When you’re to the marks, simply stop.

Good luck!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View BobM001's profile

BobM001

388 posts in 3392 days


#15 posted 02-20-2012 03:57 AM

I bought this one off “the Bay”. Made in England. The blade was “so so”. I got a replacement Lie-Nielsen blade for it. Once I saw how sharp they were and how they did their sharpening I put the original in the Veritas MK II and put a mirror edge on it with DMT’s and a 4000 grit water stone. This was a “recommended tool” for cleaning to the shoulder of a tenon at the timber framing school I plan to attend.

Bob

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7166 posts in 4213 days


#16 posted 02-20-2012 04:02 AM

Bob, that 78 is very nice. Damn now I want a 78 with the depth and lateral adjuster.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5348 posts in 3684 days


#17 posted 02-20-2012 04:39 AM

Mauricio, I could be wrong but I don’t think the #78 has a lateral adjuster. Someone correct me if I am wrong.

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - nobodhi_here

View BobM001's profile

BobM001

388 posts in 3392 days


#18 posted 02-20-2012 04:57 AM

I think he means the fence. You’re right about the blade adjustment, just depth. There is a depth shoe as well. This one even has a never used scoring blade.

Bob

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

7085 posts in 3660 days


#19 posted 02-20-2012 05:04 AM

I think some types have a lateral adjuster. Looks like one in the above pic.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17302 posts in 3680 days


#20 posted 02-20-2012 05:04 AM

Yep, that’s a complete #78. In the case of these planes, I don’t like the older ones that lack the depth adjuster. It’s crude, like that of a #120 block plane, but loads better than one without.

Pic: “Paddle”-type depth adusters on the 120 and 78:

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

17302 posts in 3680 days


#21 posted 02-20-2012 05:06 AM

No Stanley #78 that I’ve heard or read about had lateral. Did Record?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View ksSlim's profile

ksSlim

1304 posts in 3951 days


#22 posted 02-20-2012 05:31 AM

My lateral adjust is a small brass hammer. 78s work great for trimming tennons for post and rail fence.
If you have the time, you can make nickers from a steel washer.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#23 posted 02-20-2012 03:01 PM

Definitely that lever is a height adjuster, and is why the earlier flat cutters will not work in a height-adjuster equipped body. Thanks for the pics! BobM: Aha! Maybe this tool does indeed excel at timberframe tenoning, which might explain the clunky-ness of its design.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#24 posted 02-20-2012 03:20 PM

Hey, Veritas! Lie-Nielsen! Are you listening?Somebody, please give us a bronze-bodied 78 with a rosewood-filled tote, height-adjuster, lateral adjuster, mouth adjuster, micrometric foot adjuster, Horn, micrometric fence, for under $125.00??? (Ooops, that could be the deal-breaker!) Oh, wait, what other features would you like to see in a Revived 78?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5348 posts in 3684 days


#25 posted 02-20-2012 03:35 PM

PK,
I think that htis is Veritas’s answer to the #78

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - nobodhi_here

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3754 days


#26 posted 02-20-2012 03:38 PM

I love the #78. You’re right, Poopie, there’s a learning curve but it’s worth it. The trick for me is to have really sharp nickers and I usually score ahead of it. I wouldn’t attempt more than a 1/2 inch rebate or so with mine. We don’t need no stinking Veritas, Scott! However, that is a skew…..

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#27 posted 02-20-2012 03:43 PM

lysdexic: Wow, close indeed, but I’m reminded of the umm..Stanley #46 with that skewed blade? Those are beautiful planes, and I’m troubled by the thought of having to get both the RH and LH and have the set. Having a fence supported by two posts is a great feature! What is the model number for these? And so the evolution continues! Al: LOL at ‘Veritas’. After 45 years of woodworking in various endeavors, I still reel from culture shock! Thanks everyone, for your great comments! Keep ‘em coming! And though it’s rarely spoken here, I am most grateful for those who take the time to post pics, especially when I know they were taken specifically to post them here and to share their knowledge with us!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

7166 posts in 4213 days


#28 posted 02-20-2012 03:48 PM

That Veritas plane is a beauty.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3754 days


#29 posted 02-20-2012 03:50 PM

I’m with you, Poopie. I recoil from these modern fandangled designs but I think I need to embrace a bit of acceptance. After all, we’re driving those spaceage cars we saw in magazines as kids. At least LN has the common decency to make them at least LOOK like Stanleys:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#30 posted 02-20-2012 03:58 PM

Holy….Wow!
Looking at the Lee Valley catalog description, this Veritas plane can be set up to do raised panels! I think I’m in love with this plane! WOW!!

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=59999&cat=1,41182,41192&ap=1

Apparently, it is based on the Stanley # 289 in daze of olde.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3754 days


#31 posted 02-20-2012 04:04 PM

^Yeah, it’s a bada$$, Poopie. It’s got a much wider sole than the pictures would suggest and with an angled fence, the sky’s the limit. That skew would make a big difference, as well. I’m being drawn toward the light.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View BobM001's profile

BobM001

388 posts in 3392 days


#32 posted 02-20-2012 04:54 PM

MY MY MY! Now THAT is one sweet piece! Every time I look at their catalog I get a case of the “Wannas”. I should plan a trip to Ogdensburg to “oogle” all their stuff. That area is where my Mom’s family hails from.

Bob

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

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lysdexic

5348 posts in 3684 days


#33 posted 02-20-2012 05:24 PM

Yea, I am not saying that it is a modern #78. But why would they make a #78 equivalent with this in their inventory.

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - nobodhi_here

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poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#34 posted 02-20-2012 05:29 PM

Oh-oh… now I’m getting confused. The Lee Valley catalog description of this plane indicates that the blade is skewed at a 30-degree angle. But in the LV video in the e-catalog, http://www.leevalley.com/en/Home/VideoPopup.aspx?v=10 a skew angle of 22 degrees is noted. All Right guys.. which is it? I’ve only ever sharpened one skewed blade, on an old wooden-bodied rabbet plane, with less than perfect results. I’m scared to attempt sharpening an expensive skew blade, much less not knowing the angle I’m supposed to set it at. Yes, BobM, and the affliction is worse when the local Lee Valley store is 15 minutes away!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Brandon

4381 posts in 4013 days


#35 posted 02-20-2012 05:31 PM

Good point, Scott. I got to get me one of these, and when I do, I’m saying goodbye to my #78. Of course, it’ll take me awhile before I can afford one. ;-)

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#36 posted 02-20-2012 05:41 PM

lysdexic: According to the Lee Valley catalog, this Veritas plane is designed after the Stanley #289. My guess is that they still might create a plane similar in form and function to the # 78, if demand warrants it! I’ll admit, though, that this plane would be well-used in my shop for a variety of applications! Thanks for spoiling us, dammit!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Bertha

13615 posts in 3754 days


#37 posted 02-20-2012 05:49 PM

It’s definitely a plane that deserves attention. Or two planes, actually. I know Don built a panel raiser plane. There’s something just very cool about executing that with a plane. Get a set, Poopie!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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lysdexic

5348 posts in 3684 days


#38 posted 02-20-2012 06:15 PM

I messed around with one at a Veritas booth at a woodworing show. At that time, though, I didn’t really know enough to know what I was holding. The woodworker you must not be named recommends this plane and states that you only need one depending on your dominant hand.

Is there anything that #78 could do that this couldn’t – other than being cheaper. I am asking out of ignorance.

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - nobodhi_here

View Will Mego's profile

Will Mego

307 posts in 4774 days


#39 posted 02-20-2012 06:27 PM

I bought a #78 on ebay for something like $12, pretty much mint with both lateral and depth stops. However, it’s “collectors” value was ruined by the fact it was missing a tiny chunk of the corner towards the back of the sole. Completely harmless for working, of course, and I personally I don’t get collecting things. Very happy with the tool, does a great job. Only thing of course is to be careful with blade setup. For fun, I have messed with slanting the blade to the side, and it will cut a sort of sliding dovetail looking rabbit, but I’m not sure I could do that accurately enough to employ like that. I intend to someday make a dovetailing plane just for that, since I like sliding dovetails.

-- "That which has in itself the greatest use, possesses the greatest beauty." - http://www.willmego.com/

View tom427cid's profile

tom427cid

294 posts in 3532 days


#40 posted 02-20-2012 06:55 PM

Speaking of 78’s here is one you won’t see very often-
tom

-- "certified sawdust maker"

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3754 days


#41 posted 02-20-2012 07:17 PM

^That 78 got a haircut, Tom:)
Scott, I think it might be the reverse. I think there are movements the Veritas plane would excel at over the 78 simply due to the skew, if nothing else. I like to use my 78 for rebates because that’s what it likes. I’ve never really asked it to do much more. The 45 can execute the same rebate but it’s fun to lug out the old 78.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

17302 posts in 3680 days


#42 posted 02-20-2012 07:20 PM

That’s funny, I’ve never thought to use a #45 for a rabbet.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4920 posts in 4796 days


#43 posted 02-20-2012 07:28 PM

Tom427: Looks like a 78 and a 75 were left unattended together in a dimly-lit workshop!!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Dan's profile

Dan

3653 posts in 3942 days


#44 posted 02-20-2012 09:44 PM

Once I got the iron square and sharp and the plane tuned my 78 worked really well. With the fence I was able to cut very nice clean and straight rabbits. I have tried using the 78 for other jobs and it did not work well at all. So my thoughts on it are if you use it with the fence for cutting rabbets it works fine.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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Bertha

13615 posts in 3754 days


#45 posted 02-20-2012 09:57 PM

Yeaaaaaaaaah, baby!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5348 posts in 3684 days


#46 posted 02-20-2012 10:30 PM

Dan, I like your #78 “job description” and would add that it excels at long grain rabbets and can struggle with cross grain rabbets. However, that may be due to operator limitations.

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - nobodhi_here

View KenBry's profile

KenBry

484 posts in 3508 days


#47 posted 02-21-2012 03:59 PM

Have any of you guys read this article by Chris Shwawrtz? He talks about the Veritas shown above in post #25. It’s a good read..

Link to Chris's article

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

View BobM001's profile

BobM001

388 posts in 3392 days


#48 posted 02-21-2012 04:00 PM

Just an FYI,
At present there are a BUNCH of Stanley No. 78 planes on eBay at present. From rusted hulks to pristine. From starting dirt cheap to “AYSM?”. Also some rare Stanleys for CRAZY $$$$.

Bob

-- OK, who's the wise guy that shrunk the plywood?

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

663 posts in 3439 days


#49 posted 02-21-2012 04:29 PM

I just purchased a craftsman version of it ($9.00) and stole all the parts that were missing on my 78. Now my 78 is complete.

Are there any video posted on how to setup and use this plan?

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

5348 posts in 3684 days


#50 posted 02-21-2012 05:03 PM

Ken,
Yea, that is the article that I was referring to but I just couldn’t remember where I had read it. I find the article reasonable and compelling.

-- "It's only wood. Use it." - Smitty || Instagram - nobodhi_here

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