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View DamnYankee's profile

Dust Collector or Dust Filtration System

by DamnYankee
posted 12-25-2011 11:04 PM


24 replies so far

View KenBry's profile

KenBry

484 posts in 2952 days


#1 posted 12-25-2011 11:14 PM

The harbor freight dust collector is a great addition and it budget friendly. You can get it new for $160 with a coupon from wood magazine.

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 3555 days


#2 posted 12-25-2011 11:30 PM

Actually, you can get it for abou $140 or less with a coupon. Watch for it; it’s usually on sale for $149. Works great.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View DamnYankee's profile

DamnYankee

3312 posts in 3067 days


#3 posted 12-25-2011 11:32 PM

Thanks for the input on the HF DC. If I have to choose between a DC or air filtration which do you suggest?

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4152 days


#4 posted 12-25-2011 11:42 PM

A dust collector will do the most good, probably, hooked up
to your planer and to your table saw. Those machines throw
a lot of chips all over the place, with the saw producing more
airborne dust and the planer just making a mess on the floor.

Contractor saws are trick to set up satisfactorily for dust collection,
but if you have a saw that supports good dust collection, having
a real dust collector hooked up to it is a nice thing and reduced
airborne shop dust considerably.

I’d say at the source dust collection is a better investment than
filtration, but a lot depends I suppose on your own style of
woodworking and the sort of messes you make.

I’m not a big router table user, but they can be very messy. I
usually do router stuff outdoors if possible since router dust
collection tends to be cumbersome and fiddly to set up.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5227 posts in 4465 days


#5 posted 12-26-2011 12:05 AM

Ya didn’t say what TS you have. I have a Grizz 0444Z contractor’s saw, and use the HF with the bottom hood/shroud/insert (whatever) on the Grizz.
For the money, you could possibly have both.
I added good bags to my HF collector.
Bill

-- [email protected]

View Don W's profile

Don W

19329 posts in 3072 days


#6 posted 12-26-2011 12:11 AM

I’ve had a dust collector since I built my shop. I’m looking at making a filter soon. I agree the dust collector makes the most sense, first.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View DamnYankee's profile

DamnYankee

3312 posts in 3067 days


#7 posted 12-26-2011 05:43 AM

I have a Ridgid TS4511, Buffalo 14” BS, 1976 Craftsman RAS, router table and drill press

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11852 posts in 4192 days


#8 posted 12-26-2011 06:14 AM

Buy the dust collector and make your own dust filtration unit to fit your needs. Simple to do : )
Spend the extra money on good dust bags (<5 micron) or a pleated air filter canister for the DC.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 3555 days


#9 posted 12-26-2011 06:50 AM

Rob,

Definately get the dust at the source. While you’re at it, go to www.wynnenv.com and look at the pleated air filter conversion made for the HF dc. Drop on fit, 99.5% effecient down to 0.5 microns, radically increases cfm performance, for just a skosh over $100.00. Your lungs will love you. Also check out www.cgallery.com or Phil Thein’s site on his Tgein separator. I added one to the cone in my HF dc and never have to clean the filter.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View rance's profile

rance

4271 posts in 3665 days


#10 posted 12-26-2011 07:06 PM

+1 what dusty & fussy said.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View DamnYankee's profile

DamnYankee

3312 posts in 3067 days


#11 posted 12-28-2011 03:45 PM

Okay – got the HF for $150 + 2 yr extended warranty. I am building an exterior “closet” for it on an outside wall of my workshop. I plan to connect it to TS and RAS at minimum plus an open connection (by open I do not mean no blast gate I mean open for other attachment such as for vacuum or other random tools). I am not sure if I will connect BS and DP at this time (partly due to step down but mostly due to not having settled on their locations)

Thanks for all the input LJs

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

View kizerpea's profile

kizerpea

775 posts in 2872 days


#12 posted 12-28-2011 03:58 PM

YOU ARE ON THE RIGHT TRACK…IF YOU COLLECT DUST FIRST AT THE SOURCE IT CUTS DOWN ON HAVING TO FILTER THE AIR.

-- IF YOUR NOT MAKING DUST...YOU ARE COLLECTING IT! SOUTH CAROLINA.

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1186 posts in 3983 days


#13 posted 12-28-2011 04:47 PM

Buy the DC…remember the filter is only good once the dust particles are already in the air (and your lungs).

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View Raymondz's profile

Raymondz

64 posts in 4118 days


#14 posted 12-28-2011 04:53 PM

DC all the way!

-- - Ray

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5772 posts in 3736 days


#15 posted 12-28-2011 04:59 PM

Catch the dust at the tool as best you can first. Thus get a dust collector. Depends on if you can go a little over your budget mark… A Delta 50-760 can be had close to that. If budget constraints are that much of a concern, go for the Harbor Freight 2HP DC and add a Wynn canister filter to it… Best bang for the buck out there. Not the best DC, but it whips the snot out of anything else in its price class…

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View Viking's profile

Viking

881 posts in 3700 days


#16 posted 12-28-2011 05:28 PM

Rob;

You really need both DC and DF partially depending on the quality of your dust collector filter. The Harbor Freight DC is excellent starting point but, can be significantly improved.

If you add a simple pre-separator you will collect the majority of chips, sawdust, etc. before it even gets to the main DC.

If you replace the 5 micron bag filter on the HF with the Wynn 35A cartridge filter you will get sub 1 micron filtering and a significant increase in performance due to higher surface area on the Wynn Cartridge i.e., 274 Sq. ft. vs. 35 sq. ft. for the bag.

http://www.wynnenv.com/cartridge_filters.htm

Even with this performance there is still going to be some residual dust in the air, not necessarily produced by machines, so you should seriously consider a Dust Filtration System as well. There are numerous LJ Projects to make your own or you can buy. Whichever way you go it is handy to have a control with “off delay” so you can let it run for 30 minutes or so after you leave your shop.

Good luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

View BobAtl's profile

BobAtl

49 posts in 3198 days


#17 posted 12-28-2011 05:53 PM

How about both? No question a DC is superior for collecting dust at the source, preventing it from reaching your breathing zone. Design the system by good ventilation principles explained elsewhere on this site and on several other internet sites. Keep your inlet/hood as close to the point of generation as possible and position it to take advantage of the “throw” of the tool – sawblade, bit, etc. – so that the tool throws the particles into the capturing hood as much as possible. This design practice can improve performance of a lower cfm system significantly.

For the general dust filtration system, design a plenum, such as a box with filters over the opening on one or more sides that can be suspended from the ceiling or wherever you want it positioned. Provide a duct with a blast gate to that box/plenum, just as you would to any tool in your shop.

When using a tool (saw, router table, drill press, etc.) adjust your system with blast gates to capture the dust at THAT tool, so the system acts as a DC for source capture. As soon as you turn the tool off, reroute the DC airflow through the air filtration plenum via the blast gates so the system acts as a general ventilation or dust filtration system.

There – two for the price of one! If you have a high efficiency bag/filter on your DC, your air will remain pretty clean, even when using the DC alone.

-- Bob, Atlanta

View DamnYankee's profile

DamnYankee

3312 posts in 3067 days


#18 posted 12-28-2011 06:07 PM

If I am putting the DC itself outside of my shop workspace do I need to worry about better filtration as the filtered air will NOT be returning back into the workspace?

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1186 posts in 3983 days


#19 posted 12-28-2011 06:09 PM

I think you are about to get some new info here Rob from others that are wiser than I am about the outside locations.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View BobAtl's profile

BobAtl

49 posts in 3198 days


#20 posted 12-28-2011 07:51 PM

One consideration (a down side, IMHO) in placing the DC outside the shop is that you’re going to remove any conditioned air from the shop and make-up air via an open window, door or other intake will be unheated in the winter and uncooled in the summer. Also, humidity might be a problem if summers in Gastonia are anything like they are most other places here in the South. The cost of a high efficiency DC bag would be far offset by the expense and comfort factors when working in the humid summer or cold winter.

I have a heat pump in my shop with my DC inside and strongly prefer that arrangement. But that’s a personal matter and only you can decide what you would like best.

-- Bob, Atlanta

View Don W's profile

Don W

19329 posts in 3072 days


#21 posted 12-28-2011 07:58 PM

Filtration would still help. A DC is not going to get all the airborn dust. I thought about putting mine outside too, but now I’m glad I didn’t when I started to heat my shop sometimes. A 4” pipe can suck a lot of heat.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5772 posts in 3736 days


#22 posted 12-28-2011 08:03 PM

As far as filtration / filtered air requirements, the answer is, it depends… Blowing your fines outdoors is fine for some municipalities, but others, especially in places like New England and California, that can get you smacked with a hefty fine for air pollution. The Wynn filter is a really wise upgrade, as is the Thien separator. You don’t need to go pre separator like many including myself do, you can put the baffle in the inlet ring, it will still keep the filter clean and flowing well…

As was mentioned above, blowing your fines outside means any heated or air conditioned air will be pumped outdoors along with the sawdust. This can make for a nasty cold, or hot shop depeinding on your circumstances… This is not something I would like to do.

For a stopgap ambient filter, you could always duct tape a 20×20 Filtrete Ultra Allergen filter to a regular box fan (if you are like me, you have a few box fans laying around anyway). It will work well enough in a pinch… A lot of guys run with them long term… I didn’t feel the results were good enough…

Mind you, dust collection can run into some big bucks if you go out and buy this that and the other accessory… You might want to consider doing things like building your own blast gates, and dust hoods out of PVC pipe and scrap plywood…

-- Please like and subscribe to my YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/c/daves-workshop

View DamnYankee's profile

DamnYankee

3312 posts in 3067 days


#23 posted 12-29-2011 02:43 AM

Well my shop isn’t really “climate controlled”. I have a window style heat & A/C unit that at best helps take the edge off of both extremes (probably because the shop is not insulated).
I am attaching the exterior “closet” so that the intake lines up with me two major dust making tools ( TS & RAS). Total tube run about 11’.

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

View DamnYankee's profile

DamnYankee

3312 posts in 3067 days


#24 posted 01-16-2012 03:29 AM

Okay – went with HF DC. Got it hooked up to my TS and my RAS.

DANG WHAT A DIFFERENCE!

I built an exterior closet it for it attached to the back side of my workshop. I didn’t really have the space for it inside (12×20 shop), I didn’t want to listen to it all the time, and I wanted to run the tubing under the floors of the shop.

I rigged up a push/pull stick that lets me open/close the blast gate at the TS.

I also made two covers for the rectangular dust collector at the RAS. One serves as a blast gate. The other I attached a shop-vac hose connector to in the center. I can then use it to vacuum the shop like you would a shopvac. The suction keeps it in place.

When the air in the shop gets very dusty I can open the RAS blast gate and it clears the air in a hurry, though since connecting the DC to the two saws the air doesn’t get so thick in dust.

I plan to eventually connect to my BS, router and DP. Probably in that order. I find the BS produces a lot more dust, while the router more chips, and the DP the least.

Thanks for all the input on the DC.

-- Shameless - Winner of two Stumpy Nubs Awards

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