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View GaryK's profile

Surfacing rough lumber without a 16" jointer

by GaryK
posted 01-22-2008 04:01 AM


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125 replies

125 replies so far

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3810 posts in 4531 days


#1 posted 01-22-2008 04:08 AM

Excellent Gary. It’s been on the back burner forever here. I’m glad you prodded me again.
Very nice cradle. Just the right size for my shop too.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4472 days


#2 posted 01-22-2008 04:14 AM

Really great instructions, Gary. Thanks for the tips.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Max's profile

Max

56000 posts in 4783 days


#3 posted 01-22-2008 04:36 AM

This is great, thanks Gary.

-- Max "Desperado", Salt Lake City, UT

View Karson's profile

Karson

35201 posts in 4910 days


#4 posted 01-22-2008 05:38 AM

Great tips Gary. Nice job on the design and implementation.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia [email protected]

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 4384 days


#5 posted 01-22-2008 06:21 AM

Very good idea! I’ve done something similar, but without the wheels and carrier strips. You’ve definately taken this idea to the next level.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com/woodworking -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View mot's profile

mot

4926 posts in 4546 days


#6 posted 01-22-2008 06:41 AM

That’s perfect Gary. I’ve read about this, but didn’t know anyone that had tried it. cool.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Rymann's profile

Rymann

11 posts in 4287 days


#7 posted 01-22-2008 07:08 AM

This is brilliant. Very cool.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 4506 days


#8 posted 01-22-2008 07:20 AM

What a great strategy!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 4384 days


#9 posted 01-22-2008 11:46 AM

That’s a heads up method for jointing and planing without multi-thousand dollar tools. Good blog.

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 4448 days


#10 posted 01-22-2008 02:32 PM

Ingenuity is a good quality to have. This is a very well explained method of getting that first surface right. Thanks for the post.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1880 posts in 4501 days


#11 posted 01-22-2008 04:12 PM

Best version of this jig I have ever seen… Thanks!

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View gene's profile

gene

2184 posts in 4393 days


#12 posted 01-22-2008 04:28 PM

Thanks Gary, The step by step was great.
God bless

-- Gene, a Christian in Virginia

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 4671 days


#13 posted 01-22-2008 07:13 PM

Great tutorial Gary, along with a nice method of “jointing” a flat surface on a board. It looks like a great idea for those of use with a smaller jointer.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Sam Yerardi's profile

Sam Yerardi

244 posts in 4405 days


#14 posted 01-22-2008 07:40 PM

Good work , Gary. Nice pictures, too!

-- Sam

View jcees's profile

jcees

1077 posts in 4308 days


#15 posted 01-22-2008 09:56 PM

That’s a keeper. I’m going to borrow that one real soon. I usually crosscut near-to-size then work one side dead flat with hand planes then feed the rough side to the planer on a sled. Your jig handles long boards and can easily be adapted for shorter stock. Sweet! This one will be a major labor saver on the days I don’t have the time to push a plane. Nice job.

always,
J.C.

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

25623 posts in 4360 days


#16 posted 01-23-2008 01:04 AM

Great way to recieve a good result Gary. Thanks for sharing.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 4587 days


#17 posted 01-23-2008 01:10 AM

Geeze . . . good work there G-man. Excellent pictures and text. Explained it very well indeed.

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

View JJackson's profile

JJackson

104 posts in 4592 days


#18 posted 01-23-2008 01:47 AM

Gary,
You spent a lot of time designing this and building it and I think you have done a great job. Nice work!

-- Jeff, Indiana

View Mike309's profile

Mike309

11 posts in 4298 days


#19 posted 01-23-2008 11:54 PM

Thanks Gary, you have solved one of my problems. Excellent.

-- Mike

View Tony Z's profile

Tony Z

205 posts in 4299 days


#20 posted 01-24-2008 01:34 AM

Nice. I’ll trade you for my RAS. That’s a sweet jig. I’m definately building one of those. I like the idea of the runners in the grooves.

-- Tony, Ohio

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 4756 days


#21 posted 01-24-2008 02:05 AM

I wish I’d known about this sooner, I ripped 4 or 5 12 ft bds that were just too wide for my planer. The only other thing like this I’ve seen is one Mark DeCou used to flatten some wide boards. He had the same basic set up but just went back and forth to flatten his board. This is cool, no it’s way cool. mike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 4296 days


#22 posted 01-24-2008 03:24 AM

Not having a power jointer (I have been using hand planes), I will definitely use this tip. Thank You for posting it!!

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5334 posts in 4391 days


#23 posted 01-24-2008 05:46 AM

Good Job.
I be it would work well for surfacing cutting boards too.

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4498 days


#24 posted 01-24-2008 06:25 AM

SPalm – It should work great for cutting boards. I hadn’t thought of that.

You could do many at the same time also.

Easier to sharpen a router bit than planer blades after cutting endgrain.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View patrick m's profile

patrick m

197 posts in 4322 days


#25 posted 01-24-2008 06:51 AM

Wow, outta my league for now any way” That;s sweet I had a hazy dream once about a shop like yours!!!!! I’m still hearing it from the little lady about saw dust everywhere. . Some day O’ one of these days… All work now is still on site. Two thumbs up on this project it’s the thing us rookies drool over…...

-- PJM.`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸ ><((((º> ""BY HAMMER AND HAND ALL ARTS DO STAND""1785-1974 nyc Semper Fi, Patrick M

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4498 days


#26 posted 01-25-2008 01:35 AM

Another note. If you buy rough lumber, see if you could find someplace local to mill it for you.

I have a place about 30 miles from me that will surface both sides for 7 1/2 cents a BF. That’s $7.50
per 100 BF. ( Why board foot and not linear foot I don’t know?)

So adding $.10 a BF for surfacing would still make it worth it to buy your lumber rough.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View codafile5's profile

codafile5

14 posts in 4280 days


#27 posted 01-29-2008 07:16 PM

This must be the top project yet, now that makes 14 projects to do, and I havent got all my equipment together yet. as I,m new to the lumberjocks. Expertly provided !

-- Keith, Chester, England

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10737 posts in 4562 days


#28 posted 02-11-2008 06:20 PM

That’s a cool shortcut! :)

Very informative…

Thank you.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/index.php

View dalec's profile

dalec

612 posts in 4398 days


#29 posted 03-17-2008 07:56 PM

Gary,

After your recommendation that I consider a planer over a jointer due to the typical budget and space limitations in my garage/workshop, I finally ordered/received my planer. I looked hard at the Delta and Dewalt 13” planers. Finally decided to go with the Dewalt because of the chip blower and three blades.

I am about to begin flattening some boards, so I did a LJ search of came across your tutorial on this topic.

Have to say LJ is a great resource for beginners. Sure helps with the learning curve.

Thanks,

Dalec

View Narayan's profile

Narayan

8 posts in 4233 days


#30 posted 03-17-2008 08:24 PM

Nice. I’ve seen other versions of this jig which use angle iron for the rails, but I suspect your version yields a superior result.

This is only my third post on this site; hopefully it doesn’t ostracize me. I’m not a militant handtool user.

You could also do this with a handplane or two, which store very nicely :). I only have a 6” jointer (hoping to fix that “problem” soon), so I regularly surface wide boards with a jack and a jointer plane. Takes some skill, yes, but a skill that is very easily learned and pays off for a lifetime.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4498 days


#31 posted 03-17-2008 08:40 PM

Narayan – I don’t use handtools unless it’s the best tool for the job. Seem too much like work :-)

I only have a 6” jointer. That’s why I came up with this method, so I didn’t have to use my jointer at all.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View coolbreeze's profile

coolbreeze

104 posts in 4245 days


#32 posted 03-17-2008 08:41 PM

Great idea. I usually rip em all down to 6” so I can joint & plane. Thanks for the tip.

-- Jason, AL

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3810 posts in 4531 days


#33 posted 03-17-2008 08:48 PM

I have a piece of 6/4 cherry that’s a candidate for this jig.
Seems all I do is make jigs.<g>

Thanks Gary

Cheers
Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View brunob's profile

brunob

2277 posts in 4679 days


#34 posted 03-17-2008 08:50 PM

Another winner Gary!

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4498 days


#35 posted 03-17-2008 08:51 PM

This method should show up in ShopNotes sometime soon.

They have already sent me a check for it.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16284 posts in 4728 days


#36 posted 03-17-2008 09:06 PM

Great idea and very clear instructions, Gary. But I have to say, I like the idea of paying a guy $7.50 per 100 bf to surface it for me even better!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View jm82435's profile

jm82435

1285 posts in 4252 days


#37 posted 03-17-2008 09:10 PM

Congratulations. This is a good technique and great explanation. Thanks for sharing. We can always say we saw it here first…

-- A thing of beauty is a joy forever...

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4498 days


#38 posted 03-17-2008 09:20 PM

Charlie – I found out later that that’s with a $50 minimum. So you better have a lot of wood.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16284 posts in 4728 days


#39 posted 03-17-2008 10:21 PM

You are right….that would be a lot of wood. If my math is right, though, $50 would get you 667 bf of surfacing. That seems like quite a bargain if you had that much wood.

(Yes, Gary, I’m obsessed with avoiding any work I don’t find fun.)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 4278 days


#40 posted 03-17-2008 11:11 PM

wow great instruction. maybe when in have some time this summer I’ll try buying some rough lumber. thanks for the post.

View Tony's profile

Tony

993 posts in 4540 days


#41 posted 03-17-2008 11:20 PM

Nice idea Gary. But as you have a planer, why do you just not use the sledge method to flatten one side of the board, then turn it over and thicken it in the normal way.

This is the method I use for my 15” wide, 8/4 thick and 10’ long oak boards I used to make my table tops. Here is a link http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/FWNPDF/011175058.pdf, [Fine Woodworking #175] but I think you have to be a member

I did use your described method once (without the wheels) to flatten a work bench – it worked a dream.

I only ever buy rough lumber – it is a lot cheaper and you can get to use the full thickness especially useful when making curved parts for a project I.e. Chair legs, seat back rails. that 1/4” can make all the difference!

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View DocK16's profile

DocK16

1186 posts in 4596 days


#42 posted 03-19-2008 05:19 AM

Another wiinner GK. I only have a 6 inch jointer (long bed Powermatic) but for boards over 6” it just can’t plane them flat and who can afftord an 8 or 10 inch jointer. (I always wondered why the price for a 8 is almost twice that of a 6 incher. I digress, this is a great idea for getting a truly flat milled wide board and I just might have that bottom cleaning bit hangin around by my Legacy Mill. Thanks for the great post.

View ChicoWoodnut's profile

ChicoWoodnut

904 posts in 4325 days


#43 posted 03-19-2008 06:01 AM

Gary,

I couldn’t help but notice. Is that a microfiche reader in your shop?

-- Scott - Chico California http://chicowoodnut.home.comcast.net

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4498 days


#44 posted 03-19-2008 06:15 AM

ChicoWoodnut – Very observant. I had just bought a new lens for it and I took it down from the attic.
I do genealogy also and have a lot of reference material on fiche.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View DocK16's profile

DocK16

1186 posts in 4596 days


#45 posted 03-19-2008 06:21 AM

Ah Yes Chico I see it now, Microfiche reader? You must collect 8-track tapes too. I think I’ve been chasing you two around this site all night.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 4809 days


#46 posted 03-21-2008 04:45 PM

Thanks for the great pictorial, a very handy setup.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View HallTree's profile

HallTree

5665 posts in 4277 days


#47 posted 03-21-2008 04:59 PM

Great idea Gary! That idea will allow us, with limited income, to expand our woodworking skills. Thanks.

-- "Hold on to instruction, do not let it go; guard it well, for it is your life" Solomon

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2104 posts in 4237 days


#48 posted 04-04-2008 08:33 PM

Gary,
It looks like I am going to need to try this out. Do you by any chance know if the bit you mentioned (1 1/2” bottoming bit) goes by any other names? I’ve tried looking some up online to get an idea for prices, but I’m not finding much. Thanks again for this great post. It will really help me get the most out of the lumber.

Also, I do not have a jointer at all, so I think that in this case, the shorter the board you can use when you start, the less material will be wasted so cutting the lumber to the rough sizes first would probably be a good idea. Do you agree with this?
Thanks

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4498 days


#49 posted 04-04-2008 09:13 PM

HokieMojo – you can frid the bit here:

http://magnate.net/index.cfm?event=showProductGroup&theID=136

They have then all the way up to 2 3/4”

It you use this method you don’t need a jointer. The length of the board doesn’t really matter unless it’s
warped a lot. Then cutting it into smaller pieces will save you some wood.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View bayspt's profile

bayspt

292 posts in 4214 days


#50 posted 04-05-2008 12:22 AM

Very good idea. I was going to make one with just runners but I like the wheeled sled. I will also be borrowing this in the near future.

-- Jimmy, Oklahoma "It's a dog-eat-dog world, and I'm wearing milkbone underwear!"

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