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Question on cordless routers

by DonS1959
posted 04-03-2021 05:14 AM


30 replies so far

View DevinT's profile (online now)

DevinT

760 posts in 48 days


#1 posted 04-03-2021 06:45 AM

I have the Ryobi and love it. The lack of variable spindle speed is not a concern because I have bigger routers that are corded for that, like yourself. One thing I really like about it is that the body of the router is not cylindrical. This makes it fit better in the hand and I can lay it on its side to get extra leverage when I need to loosen the collet. I even went so far as to build a router table for it (see projects).

All that being said, there are some features I wish it had. For example, the light only operates when the unit is on. It might be nice to be able to turn on the light independently from the spindle, but if you are running the base along an edge guide or using it in a table, I feel this becomes less important. I can’t find a good tilting base for it whereas I believe another brand offers a tilting base sold separately. Sometimes I need to put a precision chamfer on plexiglass for jointing at an angle and a tilting base on a trim router is perfect for that task.

As far as battery life and power to sustain the cut, I tend to use the 4Ah batteries with it and I have 3 of them with one charger. I also have a 1.5Ah battery for lighter duty. I haven’t had a need for a 5th battery and sometimes I run the trim router all day long. I always keep one on the charger and those 4 batteries keeps me running all day long. I have been thinking of picking up their bigger charger that can charge multiple batteries at the same time.

Also, I like how the unit stands upright when you set it upside down. All around a good sturdy unit and it fits in my Milescraft small circle jig, making cutting circles a snap.

-- Devin, SF, CA

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#2 posted 04-03-2021 07:54 AM

DevinT thank you for your reply I am also going to be using it in a small router table which I already purchased one of the Rockler brand that is on sale rite now for $59.95 I do wish the Ryobi came with the edge guide which the Rigid does come with i looked at the Rigid and did not really care for the on off switch type other than that I liked the Rigid but for double what the Ryobi cost I do not know if it is worth the extra $$$

Again I do appreciate your input

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2109 posts in 683 days


#3 posted 04-03-2021 11:02 AM

Sometime you just need to settle on a battery ecosystem and go with it. Other wise your shop will end up with nests of chargers and batteries. Yard tools I settled on Ryobi. Shop I had several sets of Rigid combo packs the guys didn’t like anymore so I just moved them to the shop for now. I too have been wanting a cordless trim so I am lurking here for a bit.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4556 posts in 2563 days


#4 posted 04-03-2021 11:13 AM

Personally I wouldn’t put a cordless router in a table. The whole purpose is portability. Use the cordless one for that.

Since I already have Milwaukee tools, I went with that router. I’m very happy with it. I agree, I don’t use the variable speed mostly what I’m doing is flush trimming, light chamfers, etc. But, I am impressed with the accuracy of adjustment and power. M18 batteries are fantastic.

I’ve owned Ryobi tools, they may work for other people, but IMO they aren’t even in the same league with Mil or DW. After I got the Mi18 set, it was very clearly evident how pitiful the Ryobi was.

I totally agree with ControlFreak – at some point I think you should make a decision to stick with the same system. With the poor performance & battery issues I constantly had, I gave all my Ryobi tools away and was glad to see the lime green go bye bye With the exception of a couple DW 12V drills (which I love) I’m in the ‘Red Zone”.

DW is now owned by Black and Decker, and I hope they don’t do what the did to Stanley.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#5 posted 04-03-2021 11:51 AM

I really like the ryobi. I do miss the variable speed as it will burn on bits bigger than 1/4” round over.

I want to get the dewalt because of plunge base.

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#6 posted 04-03-2021 06:02 PM

Thanks everyone for your replies

Robert I have not considered the De Walt simply because I have always felt with De Walt you are paying for a name and I have never had good luck with anything cordless De Walt makes I am just not a Dewalt fan I do have the Ryobi cordless 3/8 impact and I love it i carry it with me in my vehicle to remove lug nuts when needed but it’s the only Ryobi product I have

as for mounting it in a table everything I need it for will be on a small table and i hate having to stretch a cord out i do a lot of work out in my front yard just for the fresh air and not having to clean up a saw dust mess in my garage so I want the port ability of being able to work off of a table that I do not have to use an extension cord for power

I like the harbor freight tools like the new Bower cordless drills they are well made and cheap and their batteries seem to hold up well and are also cheaper than all others but they do not make a cordless router i had thought about just purchasing the bower trim router which i have used a friends but i did not care for the bit height adjustment because when you release the locking lever to adjust it the motor literally falls out of the base there is nothing to prevent it from falling out

I do not understand why all the manufactures of cordless tools do not at the vary least include a battery and charger initially for any of the cordless tools but none do which to me is ridiculous especially when some of the batteries are more than the tools themselves.

I like the looks and feel of the Milwaukee but the cost of batteries are ridiculous and i do not care for the fence guide attachment all of them should take notes of Rigid’s fence guide attachment which Ryobi also utilizes

Decisions, decisions I hate making them LOL

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2653 posts in 1670 days


#7 posted 04-03-2021 06:14 PM

Keep dead battery packs out of the environment and leave conflict/import minerals in the ground — buy corded.

An old hippie hath spake.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#8 posted 04-03-2021 06:16 PM



Keep dead battery packs out of the environment and conflict/import minerals in the ground — buy corded.

An old hippie hath spake.

- Madmark2

well I already have a corded router i want a cordless Router

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Madmark2

2653 posts in 1670 days


#9 posted 04-03-2021 06:21 PM

Conservation is putting global needs above personal wants.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#10 posted 04-03-2021 07:07 PM


Conservation is putting global needs above personal wants.

- Madmark2

And your point

you obviously have your way of thinking and I have my way of thinking and for me my way of thinking is the only thing that really matters you have given your opinion about purchasing a corded router which if you had read my post from the beginning you would have realized I already have a corded router obviously you chose not to read the whole post from beginning to end, so your comments are pretty much useless and have no point other than to prove you are a tree huger which I have no use for.

and Honestly I could care less about the environmental things that we have no control over, I don’t really need a cordless router but I do want one and that’s all that really matters to me

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5123 posts in 2304 days


#11 posted 04-03-2021 08:16 PM

FWW magazine did a review of cordless routers a number of months ago. IIRC, the Dewalt was picked as tops, but the Milwaukee wasn’t available at test time.

They tested the Milwaukee and the next issue stated that it would easily have been their top choice.

Magazine reviews usually are good references since they can side-by-side test current models, something Joe Woodworker can’t afford to do. Then there is the issue that after “JW” has been using a tool for long enough to appreciate its pluses and minuses, that model has been replaced.

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#12 posted 04-03-2021 08:35 PM



FWW magazine did a review of cordless routers a number of months ago. IIRC, the Dewalt was picked as tops, but the Milwaukee wasn t available at test time.

They tested the Milwaukee and the next issue stated that it would easily have been their top choice.

Magazine reviews usually are good references since they can side-by-side test current models, something Joe Woodworker can t afford to do. Then there is the issue that after “JW” has been using a tool for long enough to appreciate its pluses and minuses, that model has been replaced.

- splintergroup

Thank you
that is the kind of input I am looking for I have watched numerous videos and read many reviews and what I have gathered they all have their quirks each has different features that I like and some I do not like you would think that companies making these tools would ask for those that will be using them opinions
guess i will just have to make an educated guess and live with my decision

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2109 posts in 683 days


#13 posted 04-03-2021 08:36 PM

@Robert
I said I used all the Rigid tools the guys at my office didn’t like because they were free. What I didn’t say is what they decided was better. Milwaukee is by far the best line of battery powered tools and they are on all my service and installation trucks. So if starting out or making a change go red. IMO

When they start whining about wanting new sets I’ll get the hand me downs again even though I bought them all anyway. I can always be cheap.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#14 posted 04-03-2021 08:54 PM



@Robert
I said I used all the Rigid tools the guys at my office didn t like because they were free. What I didn t say is what they decided was better. Milwaukee is by far the best line of battery powered tools and they are on all my service and installation trucks. So if starting out or making a change go red. IMO

When they start whining about wanting new sets I ll get the hand me downs again even though I bought them all anyway. I can always be cheap.

- controlfreak

Are the m18 better than m12? I used a few m12 and they were awful. Rather use Ryobi.

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#15 posted 04-03-2021 09:06 PM

what are the differences in the M12 and M18

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1903 days


#16 posted 04-03-2021 09:28 PM


FWW magazine did a review of cordless routers a number of months ago. IIRC, the Dewalt was picked as tops, but the Milwaukee wasn t available at test time.
- splintergroup

I read (ugh!) the same review… Ugh for reading (hate reading), not the trimmer.

When we are talking trimmers, avoid the rack & pinion adjusters like C19... I feel that micro adjustment to creep up on the depth is a must. Rack and pinion is a yo-yo job of ”shit I just went past the spot”.

I own the Milwaukee... hell I have a bucketfull of routers and trimmers… it has options and grunt to boot (for a trimmer). The Ryobi is a fair compromise if you choose that battery empire... as others mentioned put a monster into a router table and not a ”toy”.

While I sympathise with Mm2’s “the sky is falling”... for a handheld trimmer, you need a cordless to be able to swing around like a cat… hell a cat on a cord would have the animal activists banging on your workshop door.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#17 posted 04-03-2021 09:37 PM



what are the differences in the M12 and M18

- DonS1959

12v and 18v.

Like I said the 12v I used were terrible tools.(right angle Rachet and drill). The m18 are hopefully better.

Another way to look at this is what else might you want with the battery system? It’s pretty expensive to just get one tool with any of these brands. So it might help to think of the whole system.

I have the dewalt system. Drill, impact, sander, jigsaw, planer, and nailer. Overall, it’s fantastic. But it’s not without flaws. The impact is so-so, nailer is bulky(works great).

So I probably wouldn’t let a nitpic on the router sway my decision 100%. Unless you just have money to burn, in that case just get one of each. :)

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5123 posts in 2304 days


#18 posted 04-03-2021 10:00 PM

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1903 days


#19 posted 04-03-2021 10:22 PM

Ubiased advice on tools is hard to get in an open forum as everyone is going to justify their purchase rather than informed comparissons…. hey I’m guilty yourronner. Nevertheless, LJ’s Forum is a good start.

If you want money saving ideas… talk to your accountant!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1300 posts in 993 days


#20 posted 04-03-2021 11:00 PM

After a few years or so, the battery powered router will become a throw away tool. The Batteries may no longer be available for that tool. The corded tool lasts for years to come. The only battery powered tools I have is a drill and the flashlight. It’s almost cheaper to replace my with a new battery powered drill than to pay $50 for another battery.

Example; I have five batteries and two chargers for my drill. the batteries no longer accept a charge (making the tool worthless). I’m replacing the drill that comes with two batteries and a charger, for less money than buying two more batteries. I have corded tools I bought in 1976 that are still good. Only have to plug in wall.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#21 posted 04-03-2021 11:17 PM



After a few years or so, the battery powered router will become a throw away tool. The Batteries may no longer be available for that tool. The corded tool lasts for years to come. The only battery powered tools I have is a drill and the flashlight. It s almost cheaper to replace my with a new battery powered drill than to pay $50 for another battery.

Example; I have five batteries and two chargers for my drill. the batteries no longer accept a charge (making the tool worthless). I m replacing the drill that comes with two batteries and a charger, for less money than buying two more batteries. I have corded tools I bought in 1976 that are still good. Only have to plug in wall.

- WoodenDreams

I agree with the idea.

And I still don’t care. Lol.

I love my battery tools. I don’t and won’t regret them even when They have to be replaced. Battery tools are the future for tools like palm routers, nailers etc.

View Andre's profile

Andre

4526 posts in 2888 days


#22 posted 04-03-2021 11:27 PM

IMHO :) Hobby use or Professional/Semi ? I started with the Blue Ryobi as the years went by turned Green, new Lithium batteries were amazing, tend to rotate them 4 to 6 years, actually affordable, watch when they have special sales. Have a few Rigid 18 tools even some 18V ones, have yet to test the Lifetime warranty yet?
Oh ya, I have the 18V Ryobi trim router for the price nothing can ever compare to it! I use it for round overs and in a sled for rabbets and groves.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#23 posted 04-03-2021 11:40 PM

IMO, the ryobi needs its own category. It’s the only one that’s cheap enough to buy on its own+it doesn’t have variable speed so applications are limited. Great value though. I have 2.

I not actually that passionate about this subject. Quarantine with COVID and bored out of my mind. Lol.

View DevinT's profile (online now)

DevinT

760 posts in 48 days


#24 posted 04-04-2021 01:06 AM

In defense of Ryobi, the trim router has more than enough power. I use it in a surfacing jig with 1/2” bit to surface hardwoods. However, some negative reviewers may have been using the old tools with the old batteries. The newest Ryobi routers and tools communicate with the battery. If I use an old 4Ah model battery in the new tool, there is no communication and it’s full power all the time and the battery does not last as long. Newer 4Ah battery in the same tool and with the router in a table, if I am not pushing stock through the bit, it is essentially idling and draws less energy and lasts longer. Now, they just came up with an even newer model battery in the HP+ line that will actually deliver more power through a third electrical rail to the tool when more power is required to maintain performance under load. However to take full advantage of that feature you need an HP+ tool. They are masters of making you rebuy the same tools you already own because they keep changing the game, in a good way. The HP+ line is just plain mind-blowing with some of the tools they offer (big cordless hammer drill for example; impressive to watch it bore into concrete).

-- Devin, SF, CA

View DevinT's profile (online now)

DevinT

760 posts in 48 days


#25 posted 04-04-2021 01:47 AM

I predict the question will come up: how does the Ryobi deliver less power to increase battery life when the tool is operating without a load? I believe this is part of the reason why the Ryobi does not have a variable spindle speed adjustment and is instead fixed at 29k RPM. The router knows when the RPM drops below optimum speed and only under a load or in the face of slowing spindle speed does it request an electrical signal from the battery. Under load the flow is continuous. Without load, the flow is pulse like. This is my understanding. It’s not variable voltage or anything exotic.

-- Devin, SF, CA

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1903 days


#26 posted 04-04-2021 01:57 AM

Buy cheap tools and expect cheap batteries and cheap support. Not all batteries are built to the same quality, much like tools.

And it’s bullshit that powered lasts… I don’t buy crap but I know a guy does and a lot of his powered tools barely last the 12 months warranty period.

If you want to drag cords around I’m more than happy to stand by and chuckle at the inconvenience.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1903 days


#27 posted 04-04-2021 02:03 AM


I love my battery tools. I don’t and won’t regret them even when They have to be replaced. Battery tools are the future for tools like palm routers, nailers etc.
- CWWoodworking

++1²… Rumours have it they might juts put one in a car… other than the one that lets you turn the boot light on so you can find your corded tool that you want to use while in the bush.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9019 posts in 3659 days


#28 posted 04-04-2021 02:07 AM

I’d get one that has a fixed base and plunger type base as that could be very useful.

I’m partial to Makita but other brands are good too, DeWalt, Milwaukee…...

My Bosch Colt’s a piece of junk. Caveat Emptor.

Good luck on your decision.

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#29 posted 04-04-2021 04:39 AM

well after all this I went to home depot before they closed and picked up the Milwaukee with two batteries and a charger, the charger came with a 5.0 amp hour battery and I purchased a separate 2.0 amp hour battery, why I went with the Milwaukee is because most of the woods I will be using it on are extremely hard woods like snake wood,African black wood, katalox and things like that (I am making tail pieces for gourd banjos), i am going to be using it with a 45 degree miter lock bit in it, so I wanted as much power as I can get out of a cordless router which I believe the Milwaukee will do, the other thing that swayed my decision to the Milwaukee is it came with the 5 1/4 inch base plate which is what the small portable router table i purchased from Rockler accepts, the small Rockler table does include the large base plate but will not fit any of the cordless routers with out drilling new holes in the included base plate that came with the table,
so there ya all have it
The one thing I will say Home depot matched Ace hardware’s price which was $20 cheaper
I do appreciate everyone’s input to my post Thank you everyone that contributed to it

View DonS1959's profile

DonS1959

38 posts in 91 days


#30 posted 04-04-2021 04:48 AM

I love my battery tools. I don’t and won’t regret them even when They have to be replaced. Battery tools are the future for tools like palm routers, nailers etc.
- CWWoodworking

++1²… Rumours have it they might juts put one in a car… other than the one that lets you turn the boot light on so you can find your corded tool that you want to use while in the bush.

- LittleBlackDuck

Cordless tools were pretty much my go to tools up until April 1st 2019 my wife and I lived off grid in north eastern Arizona , up until that day when my wife got hit by a hit and run driver while taking a walk in phoenix, our electric was produced by solar and I had to figure out ways of doing thing so I did not drain our solar system so that meant using cordless tools If I needed bigger tools I used them with a generator but that was vary seldom.

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