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Crosscut with miter saw vs table saw

by coalcracker
posted 03-06-2021 10:24 PM


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66 replies

66 replies so far

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2108 posts in 683 days


#1 posted 03-06-2021 10:49 PM

A well made sled is the bomb. The only time it gets to lacking is when cutting long stock. But long stock is not often very wide. The wider the board the more you are into a slider and they seem to have more error from movement. I have a chop saw but removed it due to space limits. Now that it is gone I don’t miss it. I think of it as a framing saw that is loud and a dust machine. Waiting to do a mitre box rehab to do it manually when I need that cut. Not sure if this helps but from a tiny shop perspective it is what it is.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#2 posted 03-06-2021 10:49 PM

If you get satisfactory results using a miter saw, keep using it.

Sliding miter saws are somewhat notorious for inconsistent results. Especially in cheaper models.

Table saw/sleds once dialed in are perfect every time.

I recently bought a delta cruiser miter saw. It’s perfect over 12”. I wouldn’t hesitate to use it. But my previous saws were finicky with that wide of cut.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1866 posts in 2731 days


#3 posted 03-06-2021 11:29 PM

Precision and dust control.
Miter saws are construction tools. Table saws are woodworking tools.

Sleds, supports. but sometimes you are working with boards too long and are clumsy. On a TS, never do anything that feels uncomfortable or awkward. I take big things to size outside with my circ or miter saw, then bring it in for trim.

I hope CW has success with that Delta. Looks cool as does the Bosch but mixed reviews on precision.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6838 posts in 1671 days


#4 posted 03-06-2021 11:51 PM


Miter saws are construction tools. Table saws are woodworking tools.

- tvrgeek

Here we go again… I call BS on that one. So will anyone here who has a quality miter saw and knows how to square it (like I do). My 5-cut method got it down to under 0.001” per inch. Additionally, I can swing it right to 45º and make a cut, then swing it left to 45º and cut for a flawless 90º miter joint.

On LeeRoy’s mirror frame which was something like 3 foot by 10 foot, using his miter saw, it turned out square to within 1/16” measuring across corners.

So, I wish this myth would stop being propagated. It is just that—a myth.

Shoot, I bet you even hate combination blades.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1481 posts in 4165 days


#5 posted 03-07-2021 12:11 AM


Miter saws are construction tools. Table saws are woodworking tools.

- tvrgeek

Here we go again… I call BS on that one. So will anyone here who has a quality miter saw and knows how to square it (like I do). My 5-cut method got it down to under 0.001” per inch. Additionally, I can swing it right to 45º and make a cut, then swing it left to 45º and cut for a flawless 90º miter joint.

On LeeRoy s mirror frame which was something like 3 foot by 10 foot, using his miter saw, it turned out square to within 1/16” measuring across corners.

So, I wish this myth would stop being propagated. It is just that—a myth.

Shoot, I bet you even hate combination blades.

- Rich

I call BS with you…100%. Tune it, keep a SHARP quality blade in it, and learn how to use it properly.
As for the combination blade, one bit of blather was (rough quote) ‘only hack’s use combination blades’. lol…

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View pottz's profile

pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#6 posted 03-07-2021 12:17 AM

i agree with both rich and tony,except i usually use my ras for cross cuts so, much easier than using a sled on a ts.so as said if your miter saw is working why change.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6838 posts in 1671 days


#7 posted 03-07-2021 12:28 AM


i agree with both rich and tony,except i usually use my ras for cross cuts so, much easier than using a sled on a ts.so as said if your miter saw is working why change.

- pottz

I’d use that too, if I had one. I’d kill to have my dad’s old DeWalt from the ‘50s. Someone posted a photo on here of an identical saw. It was green with white speckled paint. Those were the days.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View mel52's profile

mel52

2061 posts in 1346 days


#8 posted 03-07-2021 01:00 AM

I use both frequently depending on what I need to cut. I have both dialed in pretty good, ok, REAL good. I, like Rich, use the five cut method to tune them in. My friends think I am sometimes anal about doing all this, most of them think a cut is just a cut. That’s why none of them are allowed to use my tools. My blades are kept sharp and clean which also helps. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View Rich's profile

Rich

6838 posts in 1671 days


#9 posted 03-07-2021 01:05 AM


I use both frequently depending on what I need to cut. I have both dialed in pretty good, ok, REAL good. I, like Rich, use the five cut method to tune them in. My friends think I am sometimes anal about doing all this, most of them think a cut is just a cut. That s why none of them are allowed to use my tools. My blades are kept sharp and clean which also helps. Mel

- mel52

I think a consensus is forming.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#10 posted 03-07-2021 01:09 AM


I use both frequently depending on what I need to cut. I have both dialed in pretty good, ok, REAL good. I, like Rich, use the five cut method to tune them in. My friends think I am sometimes anal about doing all this, most of them think a cut is just a cut. That s why none of them are allowed to use my tools. My blades are kept sharp and clean which also helps. Mel

- mel52

I think a consensus is forming.

- Rich


yeah, that the miter saw is not just a contractors tool,nonsense!

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4556 posts in 2562 days


#11 posted 03-07-2021 01:30 AM

It all depends on the miter saw. I am not impressed with my Bosch I go back to a table saw sled when I want it dead on, no questions asked.

I’ve aligned it and aligned it till a I sick if aligning it, on any given cut, it might be square and it might not. Plastic indexing levers and wobbly arbors don’t help.

Regardless,sliding miters have inherent inaccuracy.

It pains me to say the cheap 10” Metabo clicks in solidly and a Imdont have to worry about return to 90. $200 saw and it’s right there maybe better than a $600 one.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Rich's profile

Rich

6838 posts in 1671 days


#12 posted 03-07-2021 01:33 AM


Regardless,sliding miters have inherent inaccuracy.

- Robert

Crappy ones do. Pretty much all crappy tools are inaccurate.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#13 posted 03-07-2021 01:36 AM


Regardless,sliding miters have inherent inaccuracy.

- Robert

Crappy ones do. Pretty much all crappy tools are inaccurate.

- Rich


right,even a crappy cheap sledge hammer wont last and do what is made for.so what are we comparing here?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View SMP's profile

SMP

3977 posts in 987 days


#14 posted 03-07-2021 01:41 AM


yeah, that the miter saw is not just a contractors tool,nonsense!

- pottz

To be fair, out of the box it kind of is. If you buy the dewalt from a big box store it comes with a contractor blade, its tuned “enough for framing”, and the insert is usually out of plane with the tables. But swap out the blade and spend an hour pr so tuning and its a whole other animal.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#15 posted 03-07-2021 01:48 AM

The only time I had a real problem with accuracy on my cheap sliders was with large 8/4 boards. I usually rough cut, ripped them down, and recut.

My biggest complaint was with durability. I’m not for sure if I’m cursed or I just used them that much. 2 different saws crapped out in 4 years.

My new delta is perfect across 12”. I measured and used every square/method I can think off when setting it up. I couldn’t cut it better with a table saw.

Just hope it holds up.

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CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#16 posted 03-07-2021 01:51 AM


yeah, that the miter saw is not just a contractors tool,nonsense!

- pottz

To be fair, out of the box it kind of is. If you buy the dewalt from a big box store it comes with a contractor blade, its tuned “enough for framing”, and the insert is usually out of plane with the tables. But swap out the blade and spend an hour pr so tuning and its a whole other animal.

- SMP

Well heck that any saw. First thing most people do is chuck the stock blade when they get something new. Even table saws.

View Jimarco's profile

Jimarco

48 posts in 2189 days


#17 posted 03-07-2021 02:04 AM

My go to saw is a miter saw… more convenient. The cost for a quality SMS the room and mess plus you can do the same thing on a TS made me stay clear of them. My cheap Hitachi C10 is dialed in so is my TS and Crosscut sled. I would get a RAS before a SMS.

To answer the question as long as you can safely get a quality cut use what you are more comfortable with or is more convenient. With a small shop if I can’t cut it on the miter saw I have to roll out the TS and sled.

View coalcracker's profile

coalcracker

41 posts in 810 days


#18 posted 03-07-2021 02:22 AM

The 5 cut method sounds like a ninja move. I shall google it.

View pottz's profile

pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#19 posted 03-07-2021 02:33 AM



The 5 cut method sounds like a ninja move. I shall google it.

- coalcracker


not ninja just accurate!

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

9187 posts in 3491 days


#20 posted 03-07-2021 02:36 AM

Have a nice miter station set up, and as Rich mentioned it is dialed in, also have cross cut sleds for the TS and as CCWoodworking mentioned they are dead accurate. My go to??? If it is construction type work or cutting down longer boards to a manageable length then the miter saw. For small stuff the TS sled is your friend. This is true most of the time. But with the close quarters in my shop it could go either way, both methods are accurate enough to get the job done. I believe I have 3 sleds for straight cuts of various sizes and one sled for 45 matched angles. If I had room to store a bigger sled, then I would make one. Thus far no $$$$ has materialized in my bank account for the 10,000 sq ft shop.

LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#21 posted 03-07-2021 02:46 AM

my go to is my ras,it gets used everytime im in the shop,simple quick and accuarte,i die without it.even though it’s very dangerous-LMAO!

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6838 posts in 1671 days


#22 posted 03-07-2021 02:50 AM


The 5 cut method sounds like a ninja move. I shall google it.

- coalcracker

William Ng is the creator of the method. He shows it for a crosscut sled, but you can use the same method on anything with an adjustable fence.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

135 posts in 101 days


#23 posted 03-07-2021 06:03 AM

Miter saws are construction tools. Table saws are woodworking tools.

- tvrgeek

Here we go again… I call BS on that one. So will anyone here who has a quality miter saw and knows how to square it (like I do). My 5-cut method got it down to under 0.001” per inch. Additionally, I can swing it right to 45º and make a cut, then swing it left to 45º and cut for a flawless 90º miter joint.

On LeeRoy s mirror frame which was something like 3 foot by 10 foot, using his miter saw, it turned out square to within 1/16” measuring across corners.

So, I wish this myth would stop being propagated. It is just that—a myth.

Shoot, I bet you even hate combination blades.

- Rich

Not sure what number I am in the line of those who agree. But put another tick mark in the “I call BS” column.

Yes, a miter saw can be a construction tool. So can a table saw, planer, etc. At the same time, all can also satisfy fine precision.

Out of the box, it’ll require some tweaks and calibration. But, again, so will a table saw. Sure, many miter saws out there may never see any adjustment. Many may just plug it in and bust out some framing. But, back to the echo in my post, that doesn’t negate what the machine can actually be capable of with a little setup work.

Even less expensive miter saws can be very accurate. I started with a cheapo ToolShop 10”, non-slider. Was given to me by a friend. Used it for a year or so before I really got into DIY/woodworking, with no adjustment. Perfectly serviceable.

Later, when I stated honing in on precision, I invested a little time and effort into tuning it. A small pile of scrap wood later, and it was dead on accurate for both square, miter, and bevel cuts.

Only thing I couldn’t improve was the cut capacity. Served me well for years, but recently upgraded to a 10” sliding, Bauer brand from HF. Out of the box, it’d have been perfect for framing and semi-precision work.

But the first thing I did was calibrate it for accuracy. Ultimately “needed” to make a small modification to chase down the last couple thousandths. I use quotes, because it probably wasn’t truly necessary.

But the mod took all of 2 minutes. And now it’s dead nuts accurate. Even when cutting at its full 12.5” of capacity. From miters to bevels. Or just plain Jane square cuts. It’s precise and repeatable.

I won’t be getting rid of my miter saw any time soon. While some may manage certain cuts on a TS. The miter saw is frankly the better option. Not only is it better suited for certain cuts. But it can do them with every bit of precision that one could ask.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

7257 posts in 2802 days


#24 posted 03-07-2021 12:45 PM

I have a Ridgid non-sliding compound miter saw and an old Delta Milwaukee RAS that take care of most of my cross cuts. It’s really about managing expectations. Some saws are easier to dial in and stay dialed in within the level of precision you might be seeking, some are most definitely not. My RAS isn’t too bad, but there’s so much adjustability coupled with my lack of need to regularly cut more than 90 degrees, I just leave it in one place and it cuts close enough to perfect everytime for me. The miter saw with only a 10” blade has it’s limtations but doesn’t have a bunch of moving parts that can come out of alignment, as long as I don’t drop it, it does pretty well.

I also have an Osborne miter gauge for my Unisaw and it does great while taking up little space hanging on the wall vs. the room a sled would take.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1866 posts in 2731 days


#25 posted 03-07-2021 12:53 PM

We will have to disagree on miter saws. My old simple Delta was close, but the new big sliders are not. Not even close. OK for a strait crosscut, but not much else. I had better luck with my old RAS.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2881 posts in 4004 days


#26 posted 03-07-2021 01:07 PM

I use my table saw only for ripping with a 24 teeth rip blade in it and a crosscut blade in my Bosch slider miter saw.

I do all my miter cuts and cross cuts on my miter saw. I do not want to change blades all the time.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6986 posts in 3575 days


#27 posted 03-07-2021 01:16 PM



We will have to disagree on miter saws. My old simple Delta was close, but the new big sliders are not. Not even close. OK for a strait crosscut, but not much else. I had better luck with my old RAS.

- tvrgeek

Put me in that camp as well. But I do have a 60s era Dewalt RAS that’s dead nuts. The miter saw sits in storage waiting for home improvement type stuff.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6838 posts in 1671 days


#28 posted 03-07-2021 01:39 PM


We will have to disagree on miter saws. My old simple Delta was close, but the new big sliders are not. Not even close. OK for a strait crosscut, but not much else. I had better luck with my old RAS.

- tvrgeek

And you’ve tested them all personally?

This is where I take issue with your comments. You’re stating as fact something you believe to be true, but have no firsthand knowledge of.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1481 posts in 4165 days


#29 posted 03-07-2021 01:41 PM



We will have to disagree on miter saws. My old simple Delta was close, but the new big sliders are not. Not even close. OK for a strait crosscut, but not much else. I had better luck with my old RAS.

- tvrgeek

What you’re saying then, is that you’ve personally had all of, if not most of the major brands(read mid to higher end) pass through your shop? You’ve changed out stock blades for top quality miter saw blades, taken the time tune them all properly and still they all fell short of your standards?
How did they all rank in the testing? Some must have been better than the others even though none of them met your standards?
What kind of blades did you switch out for and what method did you use for tuning?
I’m always willing to learn.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View coalcracker's profile

coalcracker

41 posts in 810 days


#30 posted 03-07-2021 01:49 PM

Would most agree that a bevel cut for joinery is more accurately and reliably done on a table saw?

View Wood_Scraps's profile

Wood_Scraps

135 posts in 101 days


#31 posted 03-07-2021 02:36 PM


We will have to disagree on miter saws. My old simple Delta was close, but the new big sliders are not. Not even close. OK for a strait crosscut, but not much else. I had better luck with my old RAS.

- tvrgeek

And you ve tested them all personally?

This is where I take issue with your comments. You re stating as fact something you believe to be true, but have no firsthand knowledge of.

- Rich

Maybe he was part of the Miter Saw of the Month club?

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Jimarco

48 posts in 2189 days


#32 posted 03-07-2021 02:43 PM



Would most agree that a bevel cut for joinery is more accurately and reliably done on a table saw?

- coalcracker

I use to think that but made the same dimensional mitered frame one cut on MS one cut on TS. Both frames were gapless on dry fit. Took both frames to the Miter Trimmer and were the same. It may be not as scientific as some would like but I’ll use those results.

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Wood_Scraps

135 posts in 101 days


#33 posted 03-07-2021 02:53 PM



Would most agree that a bevel cut for joinery is more accurately and reliably done on a table saw?

- coalcracker

Maybe. Personally, I use an angle gauge for bevels. Suspect many others do as well. That angle gauge doesn’t care if it’s on my TS or miter saw.

There may be an argument that one could impart some deflection into a bevel on a miter saw. But, I haven’t found that to be an issue.

On the flip side, I’ve found that my miter saw is more mechanically repeatable at 45 degree bevels. Meaning, that I could skip the angle gauge a bit more confidently. The reason being is that the bevel stops with my miter saw are fully enclosed/sealed in the housing. The same is not the case for my TS. So, there’s a greater chance that buildup can alter the efficacy of the mechanical stop on my TS.

This one guy’s opinion, based on my experience and specific hardware. I’ll readily admit that the best option for bevels is a more legitimate debate. But, personally, I’ve never really felt like I’m giving up meaningful precision when using my miter saw, instead of the TS, when doing bevels.

View 1thumb's profile

1thumb

388 posts in 3238 days


#34 posted 03-07-2021 03:20 PM

Picture frame detail for movie posters in cinema/draft house. 12’h x 4’ w, pre-finished laminate, looked like crinkly aluminum foil, evidently pricey were alot of eyes on me. Old Bertha nailed it. Beautiful mitered and square corners. Paid $600 for her maybe 15 years ago. Rode hard and put away wet but no quit in her. Replaced brushes once over the 15 years. Don’t make them like they used to

-- I actually have two thumbs and they oppose.

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Foghorn

1212 posts in 468 days


#35 posted 03-07-2021 04:04 PM

As a weekend warrior, I’m with the pros like Tony. My Bosch 12” slider is dead on after a few initial tweaks way back when.

-- Darrel

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1481 posts in 4165 days


#36 posted 03-07-2021 06:55 PM



Would most agree that a bevel cut for joinery is more accurately and reliably done on a table saw?

- coalcracker

I don’t think there’s a simple yes or no answer for that question and thats why you haven’t gotten one yet. It all depends on the type/style of woodworking you do, the complexity of the joinery, the types of wood you would typically use…long, short, thick, thin…etc.
Best thing for you to do is build a sled for your new table saw and give it a try.
There’s a place for both if you have the room for them, but who knows? You might end up selling your miter saw.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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LeeRoyMan

1716 posts in 809 days


#37 posted 03-07-2021 07:10 PM

I can caulk up to a 1/4” so it doesn’t matter what kind of saw I use. :)

View pottz's profile

pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#38 posted 03-07-2021 07:28 PM



I can caulk up to a 1/4” so it doesn t matter what kind of saw I use. :)

- LeeRoyMan


bingo,thats professional! ;-) ive gotten pretty good havn’t gone over 1/8” in years!

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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ibewjon

2413 posts in 3875 days


#39 posted 03-07-2021 07:52 PM

My ‘50’s green dewalt is a great, precision machine. Found another, which is 10” for $150. Grabbed it and ran. I only use them for crosscut, ts for rips.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4446 posts in 2576 days


#40 posted 03-07-2021 08:01 PM

Always laugh when forums debate this topic.

+1 Generalization about which is better, where, when; are difficult and should be avoided.

IMHO – There are too many different miter saws, and people using them to declare absolutes.
All I can share is my experience:

In my shop: TS cross cut is used for anything shorter than 36” (majority of project cuts), and miter saw is used for longer boards (breaking down lumber). When I had space for RAS; used the RAS for most cross cuts; and kept the miter saw for onsite outdoor work. Have never owned/used a sliding miter saw that was 100% accurate all time (owned Dewalt & Hitachi). So I sold sliders and returned to use non-sliding ‘chop’ saw, that hides under bench till I need it.

#IAMAKLUTZ and I know it.
I can take perfectly tuned miter saw and make both; perfect cuts, and cuts with uneven or inaccurate edges. So while a miter saw can be accurate, they are not accurate 100% of time for me. Depending on saw, it’s been 50-99% accurate for me. Why?

Using a miter saw requires understanding of how saw works, and using proper technique. Different saws work differently; be them sliders, pivots, chop, etc. So can not use same cut technique for all miter saws.
As gross example; If operator stands one ft too right or left of neutral cutting position, they will often push/pull the saw to that side; and make a sloppy cut. If cutting on compound angles, operator position has to be even more consistent.
TS crosscut with well made sled is nearly impossible to push sideways. Inaccurate cuts tend be generated when boards is held by hand, instead of using clamps; especially on angled cuts. This makes the TS more accurate, at least for me, in my shop. Can still ‘klutz’ a TS cross cut, but IME it happens 1 out of 1000 on TS, .vs. 1 out of 20 cuts on miter saw?

+1 using the right blade is important.
When making angled cuts, or 90° cuts in knotty woods; I want full kerf blade on my saw. Often seen where a thin kerf blade deflects on angled cuts, especially if operator is a member of Klutz clan.
Find that 80-100 TPI blade is better general purpose cross cut blade on my miter saw. Going a little slower and letting the saw blade do all the work, ends up with more accurate cut.

As always, YMMV.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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JackDuren

1550 posts in 2041 days


#41 posted 03-07-2021 08:22 PM

I can wrap this table with a Dewalt 708 and only be off by 1/32 at the end I’ll call it an excellent woodworking tool.

I don’t use my table saw for miters.. Some seem to have not set there saws up correctly or had bad sliders to start. I set the tools up to use, I don’t let the tools use me.

View 1thumb's profile

1thumb

388 posts in 3238 days


#42 posted 03-07-2021 08:23 PM



I can wrap this table with a Dewalt 708 and only be off by 1/32 at the end I ll call it an excellent woodworking tool.

I don t use my table saw for miters.. Some seem to have not set there saws up correctly or had bad sliders to start. I set the tools up to use, I don t let the tools use me.

- JackDuren

That’s beautiful

-- I actually have two thumbs and they oppose.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1481 posts in 4165 days


#43 posted 03-07-2021 08:31 PM



I can caulk up to a 1/4” so it doesn t matter what kind of saw I use. :)

- LeeRoyMan

Meh…One day I’ll show you how to mix glue and sawdust properly…got a few different recipes. 11 herbs and spices kinda chit.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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therealSteveN

7678 posts in 1656 days


#44 posted 03-07-2021 11:52 PM



I can caulk up to a 1/4” so it doesn t matter what kind of saw I use. :)

- LeeRoyMan

Love it. Doubt it, but love it. :-)

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

7678 posts in 1656 days


#45 posted 03-08-2021 12:22 AM

I’m going to the camp of whatever tool you feel comfy with should be the one you use, cause there are always a few ways to skin that cat when it comes to woodworking.

Look at the “moving points” on a TS, nope didn’t say spinning, I said moving as in articulated, or right to left, movement. You will find the fence moves, as it is designed to, but when locked, it will not move.

Any powered Miter saw has a few. Sliding ones have a bunch of them. Anytime a tool, machine, or pretty much anything has several points where it can make a directional change, it has the ability to go off the rails. I know for a fact, even the > 1k Green miter saw if you set your left hand on it’s base, move your right hand either right, or left and the blade will also travel right or left. So those moving parts can easily work against you unless your motion to use it is perfect. Now seasoned users will know how to use it. I can see in someone without that learning curve could have more trouble with a miter saw, than a TS.

For me, until projects become so large it’s more effective to switch to, bring the tool to the work, I’ll use a TS for final cuts if I want them to be close. For “construction” and cuts that are what I will refer to as rough, as in stock breakdown, I’ll use the miter saw. I have been using both for over 50 years if you also add in meat/beer powered miter saws. I will also point out the meat/beer powered variety will also be more accurate than the motorized versions.

-- Think safe, be safe

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woodbutcherbynight

9187 posts in 3491 days


#46 posted 03-08-2021 12:30 AM



I m going to the camp of whatever tool you feel comfy with should be the one you use, cause there are always a few ways to skin that cat when it comes to woodworking.

- therealSteveN

Spot on.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#47 posted 03-08-2021 12:48 AM

well here we go again with a long time debated issue that will never have a definitive answer.so id say just do whatever you think works the best for you and call it resolved.i know what works for me and these debates will never change my mind.to each his own.peace jocks.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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RPhillips

1318 posts in 2918 days


#48 posted 03-08-2021 01:18 AM

pffffttt…. real pros use a hand saw for perfect cuts. The most accurate saws on earth are hand saws… they will show you every mistake your hands made while making the cut. :P

Use what works for you. I don’t have room for a dedicated mitre or RAS, so table saw it is for me. I love my track saw and want to incorporate that into my workbench using the parf dog holes to cut accurate crosscuts and mitres at some point.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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pottz

16863 posts in 2066 days


#49 posted 03-08-2021 01:45 AM

hand saw for perfect cuts,you funny-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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CWWoodworking

1756 posts in 1261 days


#50 posted 03-08-2021 02:12 AM


I love my track saw and want to incorporate that into my workbench using the parf dog holes to cut accurate crosscuts and mitres at some point.

- RPhillips

I have the kreg acs system. While I haven’t had a ton of time on it yet, the concept of parf has a lot of potential. Made a couple picture frames with it. Very accurate. I thought about having it replace my miter saw. In the end I decided it was just to slow/clumsy compared to a miter saw. It also takes up floor space I don’t have.

To put this silliness of “can’t use miter saw for nice work” to bed, ever been in a high end custom home? Beautiful trim with perfect miters everywhere. All done with miter saws. And they deal with inconsistent drywall, floors, framing, and plaster.

So I think a craftsman in a controlled environment with perfect everything else can do excellent work with miter saw.

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