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View sawdustmaker1961's profile

What is causing my band saw to bog down even on the simplest cuts?

by sawdustmaker1961
posted 03-05-2021 11:19 AM


36 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1380 posts in 2646 days


#1 posted 03-05-2021 12:32 PM

I assume the motor has a capacitor on it, maybe two. Test them to make sure they are not weak. Also don’t run it on a long undersized extension cord.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4454 posts in 2580 days


#2 posted 03-05-2021 01:06 PM

It also sounds sick …. – sawdustmaker1961
Define sick?
Growl, screech, whine, clunk, etc….
Specifically where does noise originate from?

Band saw is pretty simple.

With blade removed, spin the upper wheel.
If tight, growls, grinds, makes any loud noises, or takes long time to coast to a stop; time for new bearings.

Turn on saw. Motor should not make any sick noises without blade either.

- Are belts loose or dirty? Are they slipping?
Could be belt tension issue, or need new belts.

Disconnect power. Remove the drive belt(s) between motor and lower wheel.
Reconnect power and turn on motor.
If it makes a soft click in 1-2 seconds, and then a subtle purr/whine, all is good.
If the there is no click, or it takes longer than 3-4 seconds to come to speed; might be issue with centrifugal switch or start capacitor.
If it growls, or screeches at all; is time for new motor bearings.

With belts removed, spin lower wheel.
Should be almost silent, spinning smoothly, just like upper wheel.

If nothing makes any noise with blade off, try a different blade. :)

My SWAG with 26 year old band saw is 1st belts, 2nd the bearings.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1870 posts in 2735 days


#3 posted 03-05-2021 01:09 PM

You did not say what you were cutting. It should chew through an inch of Oak, but don’t expect a 3/4 HP to re-saw 8 inches of hardwood at more than a snails pace. Mine will go right through, but it is a 3 HP.

WhyMe had good advice. Actually hard to test. Might consider replacing.

On the belt, if it squeals, it’s too lose. If too tight, it will wear out the bearings. Usually an older belt will have set and a new belt will lower vibration. If a V belt, then an AX series Gates. Most use a multi-rib though.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

17548 posts in 2224 days


#4 posted 03-05-2021 01:47 PM

Make sure it isn’t wired for 230 and being plugged into 115. Or visa-versa.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#5 posted 03-05-2021 02:03 PM

Thanks guys, all good advice, when I get home from work I’ll check out everything you had to say! As far as what I was sawing, it was just 3/4 ply.

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View mawilsonWCR's profile

mawilsonWCR

34 posts in 87 days


#6 posted 03-06-2021 04:45 AM

Should we assume the blade is sharp? Even a good saw will have trouble cutting with a dull blade.

-- No trees were harmed while sending this message; however, a rather large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8563 posts in 3284 days


#7 posted 03-06-2021 04:55 AM

Way too little info – way too many possibilities. I would start with what Ken said – make sure it’s wired correctly and you are providing the proper voltage. Symptoms do sound a lot like trying to run a machine wired for 240v on a 120v circuit. Then we can move on to figuring out the “Sounds sick” problem.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3032 posts in 3724 days


#8 posted 03-06-2021 06:02 AM

The label you showed has the wiring diagram. Make sure it’s wired for correct voltage.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#9 posted 03-06-2021 01:33 PM

It’s wired for 110v, after checking the bearings like the Captain suggested, it appears to be ready for new bearings. I’ve been trouble shooting for a little while & now I’m figuring out how to pull the bearings.

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#10 posted 03-06-2021 03:32 PM

I’ve never pulled bearings that were installed like this, anybody else?

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#11 posted 03-06-2021 03:35 PM

This is the motor side

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#12 posted 03-06-2021 03:37 PM

I pulled a snap ring off of the motor side, and have been tapping on it using liquid wrench, with no results

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4454 posts in 2580 days


#13 posted 03-06-2021 03:42 PM

New information:
It takes a really bad bearings to starve cutting power from 3/4” plywood cut.

Which bearings need replaced, and how bad are they?
Noisy bearings alone may not be the source of cut power loss, and only be making it worse.

Suspect a possible capacitor or centrifugal switch issue due issues with wimpy 3/4” cut.

How many capacitors are mounted on motor? 1, or 2?
A bad run capacitor will suck power from a motor.
A start capacitor is only used for first 1-2 seconds of start up, assuming centrifugal switch is working properly. Switch would have to be stuck on, for it to effect motor power. Would also over heat start capacitor, and/or trip breaker.

Make sure to inspect the motor carefully.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#14 posted 03-06-2021 04:07 PM

Captain, I don’t see any capacitors mounted on the motor, at least not the ones I’m familiar with

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#15 posted 03-06-2021 04:11 PM

It’s the lower bearing on the 14 ” wheel that made the noise when I ran the motor without the blade

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#16 posted 03-06-2021 04:26 PM

Found it

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#17 posted 03-06-2021 04:34 PM

It’s the start capacitor, I don’t see any other capacitors

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4454 posts in 2580 days


#18 posted 03-06-2021 04:36 PM

You are posting stuff faster than I can read it. LOL

Expect you will find a start capacitor inside the junction box on side of motor.
3/4HP often does not need large capacitor with a separate housing on side of motor.

IME – Lower wheel bearings are more likely to fail when too much tension is put on belt(s).

If lower wheel bearing is bad with 26 year old band saw of unknown repair status, and it were my ‘new’ saw;
would replace bearings in both wheels, lower shaft, and the motor.
If don’t do it all now, history has taught me that I will be back inside the saw in 3-6 months replacing another bearing.

The shaft bearings in housing can be tricky to remove. The shaft and one bearing will come out the side with snap ring. Tap on end shaft with block of wood and hammer to press it out. Remove the shaft key first.
There is often a ridge in middle that prevents pushing both bearings out one side. The opposite side will have to pushed out from open side with screw driver/punch. If middle divider is short enough, and screw driver is not working; can use slide hammer to pull bearing out from center.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#19 posted 03-06-2021 04:41 PM

I will do the above. Thanks!

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View JoeK1's profile

JoeK1

32 posts in 1500 days


#20 posted 03-06-2021 04:42 PM

Was there a key in the motor side shaft and pulley? Looks like it may have run for awhile w/o one.

Make a setup to pull from the threaded end of the shaft, snap ring off. A couple blocks of hard maple or maybe a couple of long reach sockets on the cast iron bearing boss of the housing up close to the O.D. of the bearing and a metal strap across the supports with a hole . Use a long bolt or piece of all thread an washer and nut. It would be better to pull with the nut on the thread than turning a bolt using the internal thread of the shaft. Put tension on it and if necessary tap on the opposite end of the shaft. There may be a internal sleeve between the bearings and it will come out as an assembly. Replacement, you are on your own.

That could be a split phase motor w/o a capacitor, or a capacitor could be under the wiring cover. if you checked the wiring you would have noticed it. Occasionally the capacitor can be mounted remotely such as in air-conditioning equipment. I would bet on a split phase motor. My 40 year old bandsaw with aluminum wheels originally had one. They don’t have as much starting torque so with a light inertial load they are smoother starting.

I see you found the capacitor while I was typing. Are you sure you verified that wiring configuration is not for 220-240 volts, maybe you need some help in that area.

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#21 posted 03-06-2021 04:47 PM

I did find the key under the stand when I moved it, damn you’re good

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4454 posts in 2580 days


#22 posted 03-06-2021 05:05 PM

If key was missing, shaft/pulley would spin, and saw would not have power either.
So instead of slipping belt, was a slipping pulley?

Diagnosis is hard via long distance.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3279 posts in 1689 days


#23 posted 03-06-2021 05:34 PM

OK. Don’t shoot me for saying this but I spent over a year trying to put lipstick on a 14” pig. I ending up buying a new saw. IMHO bandsaws are unique in that they have sooooo many moving and adjustable parts that make it hard to tune them, especially when it’s an older saw with older parts. The combination of multiple older and worn parts just compounds any existing problems.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1870 posts in 2735 days


#24 posted 03-06-2021 07:07 PM



OK. Don t shoot me for saying this but I spent over a year trying to put lipstick on a 14” pig. I ending up buying a new saw. IMHO bandsaws are unique in that they have sooooo many moving and adjustable parts that make it hard to tune them, especially when it s an older saw with older parts. The combination of multiple older and worn parts just compounds any existing problems.

- Andybb

Odd, I find them a very simple machine. But then again, I used to repair Siemens cold fusion laser printers, Line printers and 9-track tapes. What I gather from following these threads, is cheap machines built very poorly, the ubiquitous broken upper mount on “Delta” and clones, or just plain abuse.

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#25 posted 03-07-2021 01:04 AM

BTW Joe, yes I did check the wiring, it’s wired for 110v

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1870 posts in 2735 days


#26 posted 03-07-2021 12:47 PM

But two rights can make a wrong.

“Yea, right”

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#27 posted 03-12-2021 10:39 PM

Got it all put back together, thanks for the help!

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2665 posts in 1674 days


#28 posted 03-13-2021 05:37 PM

Is the problem fixed? What was it finally?

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

3032 posts in 3724 days


#29 posted 03-13-2021 08:40 PM

IMWTK

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View sawdustmaker1961's profile

sawdustmaker1961

74 posts in 148 days


#30 posted 03-14-2021 11:04 AM

In the end, it had to be the key I found underneath the saw when I moved it for better lighting. Pulley was slipping. But it got new bearings anyway, sounds and cuts great now!

-- Two Wrongs don't make a right !

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1870 posts in 2735 days


#31 posted 03-14-2021 12:09 PM

WOO HOO!

I stand by my comment they are a simple machine. Proof in that one tiny part out of place it did not work. It needs all the few parts it has.

I used to joke, My Morgan was such a simple car that any failure would leave you stranded. It only had the parts needed to make it go. No more. Damn it was a fun car, but I just could not drive it any more.

View Ryanhiboy's profile

Ryanhiboy

2 posts in 180 days


#32 posted 03-15-2021 06:47 AM

I’ve had that problem with my bandsaw. Turned out the pulley key had fallen out of its slot.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2665 posts in 1674 days


#33 posted 03-15-2021 05:29 PM

How does a pulley key just “fall out”?! Pully gotta be walking off the shaft. Straight key or half moon? Wheel alignment and cut must have been crappy and noisy. Surprised that the alignment issue wasn’t noticeable before the key walked out.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

17548 posts in 2224 days


#34 posted 03-15-2021 05:37 PM

Loctite makes some retaining compound you can use to “glue” that key into the keyway in the shaft (assuming the key fit is proper to begin with) but the compound can be released with a little heat if it comes to it in the future.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1546 posts in 3846 days


#35 posted 03-15-2021 08:09 PM

In have an old heavy 14” all cast iron WW-2 vintage Walker Turner bandsaw. It was tedious getting it tuned in the beginning, but well worth it. Been going strong for me for 60 years!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7700 posts in 1660 days


#36 posted 03-15-2021 09:18 PM

In no way am I saying this demeaning, but are you certain the teeth are cutting downward? It really isn’t hard to flip a blade, doing so would have the teeth pointing upward, which has you massaging wood rather than cutting it. That, and the electric being mismatched, as Kenny suggested are probably the 2 biggest ruh ro’s with BS’s.

Usually it isn’t your fault, a lot of makers pack them for sharpening, which usually has the teeth facing the wrong direction for cutting on all but the strangest of home bandsaws. If they don’t shake them out, you just mount it so it looks right, but the teeth are pointing upward.

Good descriptive video, and how to fix. Short of 2 minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsynZWJPSxw

-- Think safe, be safe

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