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Transporting lumber to your shop

by JoeFuture
posted 01-11-2021 03:09 AM


1 2 next »
78 replies

78 replies so far

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GrumpyGolfGuy

110 posts in 355 days


#1 posted 01-11-2021 03:21 AM

I have a Chevy Silverado 2500 no topper. Here in Michigan I try to make my lumber runs on good days, watching the weather and planning accordingly, even in the winter. On those rare occasions when I get caught in bad weather, rain and such I caver the lumber in plastic as much as I can. I usually let it set in my shop for a week or 2 to acclimatize to the shop before I use it for anything. If it gets wet, I just let it dry longer.

Chris

View Walker's profile

Walker

464 posts in 1531 days


#2 posted 01-11-2021 03:43 AM

What do I wish i had for transporting lumber and sheet goods? Well if I didn’t have to pay for it. Bollinger B2. By their measure, fits “(40) 16ft long 2×4s Fit Through Patented Passthrough or (72) Sheets of 4’x8’ 1/2 Plywood fit with Rear Seats Removed”

40 2×4s Fit Through Patented Passthrough
72 Sheets of 4’x8’ 1/2 Plywood fit with Rear Seats Removed

https://bollingermotors.com/bollinger-b2/

-- ~Walker

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Dave Mills

70 posts in 458 days


#3 posted 01-11-2021 03:49 AM

I have rented pickups and vans from Home Depot. $20 for 75 minutes, which is enough for me to make the round trip. The vans can hold a flat 4×8 sheet of plywood inside, without getting wet.

I have no other reason to own a pickup truck or a van like that.

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mtnwalton

97 posts in 2085 days


#4 posted 01-11-2021 03:57 AM

Honda Odyssey, one reason i got a van over a truck. No worries when it rains

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Woodmaster1

1709 posts in 3646 days


#5 posted 01-11-2021 04:04 AM

I used a dodge caravan to transport lumber and sheet goods. I called it my panel truck. Sadly my son totaled it the first day he had his license, no injuries except to the van. I use my jeep Cherokee with the seats down and for sheet goods I use my wife’s van. I have to clean it when I am done.

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sansoo22

1415 posts in 713 days


#6 posted 01-11-2021 05:00 AM

I drive a Tacoma with the access cab and hauling lumber in the rain is not fun. I have not found a good solution for keeping things dry. Last time I needed a handful of sheets of ply it was of course raining. Like Chris I try to plan around the weather but i live in the midwest so the forecast is as much a guess as it is science. While I was at the yard I picked up the cheapest 1/4” sheet they offered to toss on top. Figured if it didn’t get too wet maybe some could be salvaged for shop cabinet drawer bottoms.

If I lived anywhere it rained a lot I would most likely be looking at a van. While I personally think they are butt ugly the Ford Transit vans would make a great lumber hauler. Might not be the coolest thing to drive around daily but they hold a ton of crap in them and have a pretty low load height.

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JoeFuture

43 posts in 231 days


#7 posted 01-11-2021 05:10 AM

Yeah, I’m kicking myself for selling our Odyssey years ago. I can’t imagine buying one now that the kids are older though.

Woodmaster1 – glad to hear your son was ok!


I drive a Tacoma with the access cab and hauling lumber in the rain is not fun.

Do you lay the sheets flat in the Tacoma with the tailgate down?

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

17283 posts in 3677 days


#8 posted 01-11-2021 05:19 AM

Chevy Avalanche. Covered bed, midgate that carries 4×8 sheet goods.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

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higtron

277 posts in 3736 days


#9 posted 01-11-2021 05:20 AM

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

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sansoo22

1415 posts in 713 days


#10 posted 01-11-2021 05:25 AM



Do you lay the sheets flat in the Tacoma with the tailgate down?

- JoeFuture

Ya the tailgate has to be down. I have a couple 2×6 pieces that lay across the molded slots in the bed and toss the plywood across those. Throw on a couple ratchet straps in an X pattern and its nice and secure. Nothing has flown away on me yet and around here 80 mph is the average speed on the highway.

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BurlyBob

8743 posts in 3325 days


#11 posted 01-11-2021 05:27 AM

Ram 1500 with a canopy. The lumber yard is 3/4 of a mile away.

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AlaskaGuy

6484 posts in 3368 days


#12 posted 01-11-2021 05:44 AM

Long bed pickup with tonneau cover

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AlaskaGuy

6484 posts in 3368 days


#13 posted 01-11-2021 05:45 AM



Ram 1500 with a canopy. The lumber yard is 3/4 of a mile away.

- BurlyBob


Lucky guy, mine 20 miles each way.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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SMP

3830 posts in 965 days


#14 posted 01-11-2021 05:54 AM

Look on craigslist for a used trailer. Can usually find for $1000 or so. Light enough to tow with anything.

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JoeFuture

43 posts in 231 days


#15 posted 01-11-2021 06:40 AM

Thanks folks. A trailer’s probably not going to work behind the Prius. I’ll have to resort to something like this for now.

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CaptainKlutz

4364 posts in 2553 days


#16 posted 01-11-2021 08:36 AM

Thanks folks. A trailer s probably not going to work behind the Prius. I ll have to resort to something like this for now. – JoeFuture
Not so fast on that Prius trailer!

Toyota included trailer hitch option for the Prius starting 2015. Most hatchback models made since 2004 release can be fitted with a 2000 lb rated hitch, and offer at least 1000lb towing capacity.

Northern Tool, HF, and others sell a folding 4×8 trailer kit that stores vertically to save space.
Uhaul will rent you a small 5×9 utility trailer for $19 day that will haul 1000lbs if you don’t want to buy a trailer.

Cover the load with trap when the weather is nasty.

IME – The challenge with owning trailer is space/cost of storage/upkeep. If you don’t use it at least once a month, or don’t have room and HOA rules will not let you store it at your home, renting becomes next best option. Adds ~20 min to my travel time to drive over to one of three of the nearest U-Haul stores and pick up the smallest $15 ramp trailer (for motorcycles) when need one to haul a used tool into shop. Almost too easy with online reservation and checkout feature.

Where there is a WILL, there is a way; no matter how silly it might look!

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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tvrgeek

1794 posts in 2708 days


#17 posted 01-11-2021 10:09 AM

Ah yes, the famous Lowe’s picture. The driver was found wondering around the street, three sheets to the wind.

Anyway. I bought one of those fold-up trailers from Horrible Freight. It worked, but I found it very inconvenient and folding it was at the limit of my back. Add the cost of the trailer, hitch, where to keep it and annual license and tax, it was pretty expensive per trip. Do check as most small cars have only about a 500 Lb tow limit. Strain on both transmission and brakes. A trailer hitch on a used car will knock it’s trade in by a bunch.

I used a roof rack on my old Saabs for years. Just rented or had delivery if more than a sheet or two. ( Always have an over the front tie down!) Limit was 6 rail road ties in the back of my 900. I used a sling over the side for long boards. I do not know if you can get racks now that are strong enough as we don’t have drip rails.

Do some math. Renting a truck every time seems like a lot of money as does delivery service, but figure the cost of a new truck and amortize that per wood delivery. If raining, rent a box truck.

Personally, I hate trucks and the driving position in a Toyota is not comfortable for me, so I swapped an MG GT for an old Sonoma. I use it constantly, but more for house and yard. If just woodworking, I would still rent. In reality, I should sell my GTI and just drive the truck as I am retired and go no where, wife has a nice car and I have my MG and Triumph. But darn is the GTI a really great car. I could weld a rack on top, but not be able to put three yards of mulch in it.

In a perfect world, I could buy a new Volvo 240 Wagon with a roof rack. Alas, I live in Hillsborough, not Perfect.

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therealSteveN

7523 posts in 1633 days


#18 posted 01-11-2021 11:18 AM

Double tap….

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

7523 posts in 1633 days


#19 posted 01-11-2021 11:24 AM


- JoeFuture

Haven t seen that pic in years. I simply don t have a point of reference to whatever that person was thinking, but just the pic is a complete educational tool on the subject.

Chebby K-1500 8’ bed, and if that doesn’t work a 14’ trailer. I have opted to engage a Farmer friend with a semi, and 44 flatbed trailer a few times though.

In more recent years and for that amount of plywood I have found the friendly folks at Menards and their trick semi’s, that turn into forklifts, can put entire lifts of plywood handily just inside my barns overhead door. It costs 59 bux, and is worth every penny. No lift, no carry, and waterproofed hands off. Plus while buying that amount of plywood I have always gotten a better price on the plywood, which in turn could be viewed as hands off delivery, for free, and dinner to boot. You will ALWAYS need more plywood. :-)

- therealSteveN


-- Think safe, be safe

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Tony1212

512 posts in 2794 days


#20 posted 01-11-2021 01:44 PM

I have a 96 Chevy Suburban with no 3rd seat. It’s essentially a Chevy pickup with a roof extended over the the bed. 4×8 sheets of plywood fit in between the wheel wells with the back seats down. I’ll just keep the wood in the truck and pull it out as needed.

It has a pickup-like tailgate instead of side by side doors with a flip-up window. So if I need to carry anything longer than 8ft, I can either drop the tailgate or open the window.

Unfortunately, due to the lockdown, I haven’t driven it at all in 2020 and now I can’t get it to start. Gotta wait until spring to work on it.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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northwoodsman

526 posts in 4805 days


#21 posted 01-11-2021 02:07 PM

Two F-150 SuperCrew 4×4’s with covers.

-- NorthWoodsMan

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Lazyman

6944 posts in 2446 days


#22 posted 01-11-2021 02:22 PM

I have a 2002 Honda Odyssey van I bought new that I kept specifically because with the middle row seats removed, I can fit 2 or 3 sheets of 4×8’ plywood in the back. I rarely need more than 2 for my hobby projects but 2 trips are generally not a problem. I can also fit several 10’ boards up the middle even without the middle row seats removed. Unfortunately, you cannot fit a 5×5’ sheet of Baltic Birch in any orientation so I either have to tie it to the roof rack or have them break it down for me.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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MPython

351 posts in 871 days


#23 posted 01-11-2021 03:12 PM

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tvrgeek

1794 posts in 2708 days


#24 posted 01-11-2021 03:16 PM

Surprising rating on the Prius.

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Meisterburger

40 posts in 297 days


#25 posted 01-11-2021 03:21 PM

Unfortunately for me the big stores around me don’t really have a van or truck to haul everything home on the cheap. I have to go with the slightly pricier U-Haul van. Everything fits in a U-Haul van

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splintergroup

5014 posts in 2281 days


#26 posted 01-11-2021 03:36 PM

Trailers are perfect for this, but in your situation with parking, etc. probably not a viable solution.

I have an over-cab rack on the back of my short bed truck which has been perfect for even 16’ lengths of 8/4 poplar
and other over 8’ lengths of wood. As to the rain issue, pre-placing a tarp which can then be wrapped and secured over the load on a rack would help with the bulk of the water.

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JoeFuture

43 posts in 231 days


#27 posted 01-11-2021 05:55 PM

My Prius is a 2013 Prius-V. We live at the top of a big hill, and that thing barely makes it up with just me in the car, even in “power mode”. CaptainKlutz nailed my concern with buying a trailer, even to pull behind the Ascent… storing it is not really an option with our yard/house/neighborhood, and I’d rather not pay to store one at some lot. Renting a box truck as needed is probably my best option for now, though the over-cap rack also looks like a really nice option. Honestly, I’d rather spend the $ on tools or lumber than a vehicle, but some day that Prius’s battery will fail and it won’t be worth replacing. The -V is a great car though (43mpg on hills ain’t bad, and it’s paid for), and like I said I can get 10’ boards inside diagonally. Just not the amount I’d need for the project I want to build. For that, I think a rented box truck or van sounds like the best option for me.

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Axis39

470 posts in 656 days


#28 posted 01-11-2021 06:15 PM

I haven’t read all the replies, so I’m probably repeating or contradicting someone’s response… Sorry in advance!

I have worked in the industry (new construction, remodeling and custom woodworking) since I was 15. I’ve owned a pickup most of that time. But, as I got older, i started working less and less doing construction, and focused more and more on the finer work.

I am also a musician and need to transport a pile of crap to gigs and band practices. I had a Ram 1500 with a tuneau cover and, at the time, lived in Virginia. It rains there kinda regularly. It was great for a while, but eventually the cover developed a leak. It wasn’t bad, but any bit of whatever and guitars (or raw wood), as you know, is not real conducive to a low stress lifestyle.

So, currently I own a Jeep Cherokee. It was fantastic for the music stuff, and at the time I wasn’t buying sheet goods or too many long boards… I was subbing work and made the contractor pick up and deliver materials.

Now, I live in SoCal and am doing more buying of bigger wood, sheet goods and long boards. I use the roof rack, and it’s done okay, but I’ve decided it’s time to switch back to a pickup. But, I don’t have to worry so much about rain or snow… Heck, I went 9 months without seeing any rain last year.

As a professional back East, I seriously contemplated a box truck, or a delivery truck, or a van of some kind. I liked the idea of an old UPS truck with my company name painted on the side…. I had plans, at one time, to set one up as a rolling workshop. But, any of the Mercedes/Ram/Ford tall vans would be a good solution for an every day work truck with room for hauling materials around and keeping them out of the elements.

As for a pickup truck with a short bed… I struggled when I bought my last Ram. Finding one in stock with a long bed was a tough one. I ended up going with the 6’+bed and it worked out fine for about everything. If I was picking up stuff longer than about 10 or 12 feet, I’d just put in at an angle out over the cab. A ladder/lumber rack is the best non-rain solution…. But, I never really found the short bed a hindrance, other than capacity for tools….

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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WoodenDreams

1293 posts in 970 days


#29 posted 01-11-2021 07:45 PM

I use a 1974 F100 short box pickup with a topper. I now only go out and get my wood needed on nice days (Not foggy, raining, or high humidity days). Woodstock Supply, a local hardwood supplier is only four miles from me. Most of what I get from them is only S3S (surfaced on three sides). They’ll cut the 8’, 10’ and 12’ boards down to any length I want for free. They’ll also run the boards through their planner or jointer for a small fee. If I go to Menards for my boards, I normally only check out the 4’ or 6’ lengths. Most of my projects are less than 3’ long.

I didn’t used to worry about weather conditions, until, On a project two years ago I needed one more mahogany board and didn’t want to wait for the Monday, since Woodstock is only open weekdays. I ended up going to Menards for it. Was raining that day. Got a nice straight 8’ mahogany board. By the time I got it to my shop (a three mile drive), the mahogany board got wet and soaked up the rain, it ended up with a twist only good for a fire place. To salvage it I ended up cutting it down for a Urn. I had the topper off the pick at the time. Had to wait till Monday to go get the board from Woodstock.

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Sylvain

1225 posts in 3558 days


#30 posted 01-12-2021 10:18 AM

What about a pick-up glass rack for panels?

Paul Sellers uses a trailer:
https://paulsellers.com/2018/05/moving-my-stuff/

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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Peteybadboy

3299 posts in 3009 days


#31 posted 01-12-2021 10:43 AM

F150 Super Crew short bed, w tonneau cover.

-- Petey

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CWWoodworking

1678 posts in 1238 days


#32 posted 01-12-2021 11:04 AM


Lucky guy, mine 20 miles each way.

- AlaskaGuy

I thought you just went out in the woods like those Alaska shows on tv? :)

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CWWoodworking

1678 posts in 1238 days


#33 posted 01-12-2021 11:06 AM

Passenger van. Most useful vehicle made.

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GreenIsle

17 posts in 1552 days


#34 posted 01-12-2021 11:52 AM



- higtron

Now i don’t feel so bad with the citroen berlingo!

:)

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jdh122

1234 posts in 3877 days


#35 posted 01-12-2021 11:56 AM

I have a compact hatchback (Corolla hatchback). I also own half a trailer (co-own it with a friend, which is nice since he lives in the country and stores it), which I use when I want to buy larger amounts or plywood. But I’ve transported pretty significant amounts of lumber in the car, with the trunk open, tied down onto the wood. Up to 12 foot lengths, and a good 15 boards or so with little problem. There’s no way to stop the car from beeping, which is annoying (I wear earplugs), and I generally plan around the weather, although you could wrap the sticking out part in a tarp. Twice I’ve made lumber runs about 2 hours away using this method, including once in -10 Celcius, which was chilly on the ride home even with the heat cranked.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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Ocelot

2978 posts in 3697 days


#36 posted 01-12-2021 12:14 PM

I have 3 options.

I have hauled 30 sheets of 7/16 OSB in my Honda Odyssey with the second row seats removed and the third row folded.

I’ve also a 99 Dodge ram truck with 8 foot bed.

Best, however is my wife’s Ford Transit 350 high top 15 seat van. We always have the back row out.

I have loaded 14 foot boards up the isle all the way to the center console. With all doors closed. You can load sheet goods on edge between seats. With all but 4 seats out, leaving 2 rear seats on right and 2 front seats, you can load about a ton and a half of lumber in the dry. With most seats in, you can slide boards under the seats up to about 4 inches stacked or maybe 5.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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tvrgeek

1794 posts in 2708 days


#37 posted 01-12-2021 01:02 PM

Simple economics:
A stripped F150 std cab, long bed is over $30,000. Typical new truck sales closer to $40,000.

You can rent a lot of U-haul vans or pay a lot of delivery charges for that! Never mind the 2 MPG and have to put up with driving a tank. Probably not what a Prius owner wants for a commuter. Just a guess. OK 2 is pushing it, but my Sonoma, smaller, lighter, still can barely get 18. I actually like the Sonoma. It is the lowered “sport” suspension so it actually handles quite a bit better than the standard S10 did. Bigger bars, different shocks, quicker steering, anti-tramp shock. In reality all I need, but I love my GTI.

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Ocelot

2978 posts in 3697 days


#38 posted 01-12-2021 01:09 PM

My 99 ram 1500 cost me $3600 maybe 6 years ago. I’ve gotten my money’s worth. But renting a trailer when you need it is certainly an economical option, I agree. Other than paying for delivery, it’s the most rational option for occasional use. Having a friend with a big van is probably the best option. My kids, most of them.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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Ocelot

2978 posts in 3697 days


#39 posted 01-12-2021 01:11 PM

Double post deleted

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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Robert

4524 posts in 2540 days


#40 posted 01-12-2021 01:18 PM

Rent a truck from Hime Depot – cheaper than buying a truck for the occasional lumber run.

If you get a truck, a rack is really a good solution to hauling lumber.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Murdock

165 posts in 3543 days


#41 posted 01-12-2021 03:17 PM

I used to have a Saturn Vue (small SUV), it could haul up to 2’x8’ sheets if you put the back seats and the front passenger seat down. I even put a couple of 10’ boards in there once at a steep angle with it sitting on the dash. I could actually haul more inside of that than my current Honda Pilot because of the ability to put that front seat down. Not that I am suggesting you get a Vue, but I wish my Pilot had the ability to put the front seat all the way down like that.

I can put 8’ boards in the pilot up the middle, but you are limited in numbers. I think it will do 6’ in the back at a slight angle.

I generally rent a UHaul trailer anytime I need to haul more than a few pieces of stick lumber over 6’.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

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sras

5970 posts in 4188 days


#42 posted 01-12-2021 04:04 PM

I have a 1500 Silverado w/ 6 1/2 ft bed. It has a folding flat bed cover. Here’s how I haul lumber

Shorter stock goes in the bed with the cover on.

Longer stock is hauled in the bed with the cover folded back and tailgate up.

Long stock up to 16’ (the edge of the tailgate is 8’) can be hauled with the tailgate down and shorter pieces stacked on top of the long ones to keep them stable. The trailing end is secured with ropes to provide lift and keep tension to the front of the truck.

Very long stock up to 24’ can be hauled by adding my kayak racks to the roof and tied down with care.

I use 2 options to deal with rain.
First – don’t worry about it. If the rain is light the wood gets damp and dries out.
Second – wrap the wood in plastic. I keep some used drop cloths for this. Plastic is used for heavier rain and nicer plywoods with thin top veneers.
.
.

Given that you have a Jeep Cherokee -

I’d suggest you get a roof rack that is easy to add/remove. Much cheaper than getting a different vehicle.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View JoeFuture's profile

JoeFuture

43 posts in 231 days


#43 posted 01-12-2021 05:14 PM

I’ll need to make another trip to the local yard to see what driving a box truck or pulling a trailer would be like with their parking lot. They have maybe 5 spaces in front of the doors and then parallel parking beside the shop. After that, I have no idea where I’d put a long vehicle there. There’s another shop with a much better parking situation but less selection, so it’s a trade-off. Anyone in the Seattle area want to start a new yard on the East side & looking for a silent partner?

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bilyo

1346 posts in 2162 days


#44 posted 01-12-2021 10:25 PM

I have a Dodge Dakota with a short bed. It has a snap-down vinyl cover which is great for protecting smaller stuff from the weather. And, it can be easily removed and tucked into a small space if I need to haul anything that sticks above the bed sides. I rarely buy lumber longer than 10-12 feet but, when I do, I unsnap just the rear few snaps of the cover and slide the lumber in over the top of the tailgate. The tailgate has a protector on the top edge. The lumber rides nicely there with no tendency to slide out. A flag on the end makes it legal. It is fairly easy to wrap the exposed ends with plastic if needed. I can easily carry a dozen or so 2X6s this way. If the load is bigger, I’ll lay it flat on the bed and leave the tailgate down. This load just has to be well tied down to keep it from sliding out. Again, with the vinyl cover, only the exposed ends have to be protected from weather. Plywood also rides on top of the tailgate. I don’t usually buy more than one but, I could carry 3-4 3/4” sheets this way.
With this arrangement, a Tacoma or similar vehicle would serve you well.

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stevet47

26 posts in 2319 days


#45 posted 01-12-2021 11:33 PM

A $60 bed extended from Harbor Freight works great. https://www.harborfreight.com/truck-bed-extender-69650.html

It can go vertical to put stuff on the roof (4 16’ PT 6×6’s in this case), or is can extend out the back. If you go out the pack you just need to be carful with dips/hills, it will scrap the ground pretty easy unless your truck is lifted.

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JWFESQ

1 post in 97 days


#46 posted 01-12-2021 11:35 PM

Harbor Freight sells nice little trailer that holds 1000 lbs. I bought mine about 9 years ago for about $300.
It is 4’x8’ and folds in half of storage. You have to put your own rails on it, but all brackets and hardware are
Included.

-- JWFESQ

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1162 posts in 446 days


#47 posted 01-12-2021 11:54 PM

A lot of good solutions. Makes me think of a bad solution I saw but I’m assuming he got home. About ten 16’x 2” x 4” tied underneath a small car with the ropes going over the roof from end to end. Not sure if he was stopped or made it home!

-- Darrel

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Lazyman

6944 posts in 2446 days


#48 posted 01-13-2021 01:25 AM

The boards were underneath?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Foghorn

1162 posts in 446 days


#49 posted 01-13-2021 01:35 AM


The boards were underneath?

- Lazyman


Yup. Don’t hit any big bumps or transitions and you just might make it home with everything in one piece! :)

-- Darrel

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Lazyman

6944 posts in 2446 days


#50 posted 01-13-2021 02:17 AM

I would have followed them home and videoed the entire trip. :-)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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