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fresh olive limb. how soon can i use it?

by Stephen
posted 09-12-2020 04:31 AM


35 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10782 posts in 4559 days


#1 posted 09-12-2020 08:24 AM

Several years, I would guess. I think fruitwoods take a long time to dry. You can cut it into boards now of course, and drying will go faster that way. Making boards will reduce the likelihood of cracking through the log, which is a pretty high likelihood imo.

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2208 posts in 459 days


#2 posted 09-12-2020 08:36 AM

Depends on what you intend to do with it, I suppose, but olivewood holds moisture for a very very long time. It will for sure check from the heartwood, especially from knotty and/or crotch areas, and is highly likely to warp if you slab it. Also is typically very branchy, so the grain is often wavy and holds alot of tension.

Best way to cure turning blanks, or knife scales, etc., is to completely coat them in thin layer of beeswax, then wrap in brown paper (like what you use to cover floors when painting). Once moisture level is around 30%, then you can clean them up and air dry until you get to a moisture content you can work with.

If you slab it, You´re looking 2 – 3 years cure time of slow air-drying, minimum, if you dont have access to a kiln. Expect checking anyway; i usually fill checks and such with tinted epoxy, but ONLY after sufficient drying time. If you fill checks too soon, the epoxy will act like wedge and drive the checks deeper.

I have cut up really old fence posts to repurpose, and while the outer surface is grey and split and appeared rotten, the interior is still wet, sound, and hard as a rock.

Unless the wood is bone-dry, and even then, olive will just laugh at sandpaper and gum it up real fast. A card-scraper is much more effective. Also very prone to tearout from surface planer due to wavy grain patterns.

A couple of examples, to show where you can expect checking.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#3 posted 09-12-2020 09:29 AM

Somewhere I heard to allow 1 year for each 25mm (may take a few extra days for 1”). Naturally this doesn’t allow for environment and type of timber, however, it is just a rule of thumb to do some quick mental arithmetic with… For example, it may be futile to consider working on it in under 3 years time and maybe make plans for 5-6 (if uncut).

Slice and dice and you’ll use it sooner… A moisture meter could be a prudent investment, though I have no idea what the ideal “working” moisture level should be and the returned values would be surface predominant… I guess RTFM.

With my limited knowledge of timber storage, I believe sealing the ends was/is a wise move. I have an old electric fry pan with paraffin wax that I can dip a 300mm dia. twig into,

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Sasha's profile

Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#4 posted 09-12-2020 09:47 AM

Through a lamp (lighting), connect to one end + (plus), and to the other end – (minus). This method will speed up drying. It is advisable to put on plastic bags at the ends to slow down evaporation. Drive nails into the ends, through the bags and connect the nails together. GOOD LUCK …. but small cracks are inevitable.

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

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Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#5 posted 09-12-2020 09:59 AM

Through a lamp (lighting), connect to one end + (plus), and to the other end – (minus). This method will speed up drying. It is advisable to put on plastic bags at the ends to slow down evaporation. Drive nails into the ends, through the bags and connect the nails together. GOOD LUCK …. but small cracks are inevitable.

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

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Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#6 posted 09-12-2020 10:02 AM

Reading the comments, I remembered the proverb – I heard a ringing, but I don’t know where he is …
May the Almighty forgive me…..

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

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Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#7 posted 09-12-2020 10:10 AM

More nails possible. Not deep 1.5 – 3 cm

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#8 posted 09-12-2020 10:23 AM



Through a lamp (lighting), connect to one end + (plus), and to the other end – (minus).
- Sasha

I hope those unprotected “nails” are not connected to an electrical power point.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#9 posted 09-12-2020 10:33 AM

You can clearly see it in the photo. Yes, the nails are plugged into the outlet. The trunk itself lies on a dry tree. Do not be afraid will not Kill … LOL …
LBD Or are you kidding ????

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

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Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#10 posted 09-12-2020 10:37 AM

Laughing …. In Russia. for practical (good) advice – Say Thank you.

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#11 posted 09-12-2020 11:25 AM

.


You can clearly see it in the photo. Yes, the nails are plugged into the outlet. The trunk itself lies on a dry tree. Do not be afraid will not Kill … LOL …
LBD Or are you kidding ????

- Sasha


No I’m not kidding… loose electrical wires is a sure way of getting accidentally hurt.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View HarveyM's profile

HarveyM

124 posts in 2934 days


#12 posted 09-12-2020 11:37 AM

Here’s an article on woods & moisture. One method they mention is cutting a test piece, weighting it, oven drying completely (0%) & reweighing. From that you could calculate the weight target for any percent moisture content you want. (they also describe using moisture meters)

http://owic.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/pubs/EM8600.pdf

-- Just a Duffer

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1362 posts in 3995 days


#13 posted 09-12-2020 12:05 PM



You can clearly see it in the photo. Yes, the nails are plugged into the outlet. The trunk itself lies on a dry tree. Do not be afraid will not Kill … LOL …
- Sasha

Thats an interesting technique for drying…I’ve never heard of it before.
You are an adult and are obviously aware that it could kill you.
Be aware, be careful, and carry on…

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2134 posts in 3705 days


#14 posted 09-12-2020 12:17 PM

It can KILL and start a fire. No chance I would try that inside, or outside. The loose connections to the nails can arc and start a fire. And would that be 240 volts? Scary.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#15 posted 09-12-2020 12:26 PM


...You are an adult and are obviously aware that it could kill you….
- Tony_S

It can KILL and start a fire. No chance I would try that inside, or outside. The loose connections to the nails can arc and start a fire. And would that be 240 volts? Scary.
- ibewjon


Those was my immediate, unqualified thoughts… I do not encourage recommendations that could kill you… even under the recommenders direct supervision… Sorry Sasha, do not agree!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Sasha's profile

Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#16 posted 09-12-2020 12:51 PM

LBD И (and ) Ibewjon ? Who are you by education ?? If the wood is very damp, then the light is on at half the incandescence. Who will it kill ? Turn on your brains, Lord. What kind of fire through a light bulb ???????

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#17 posted 09-12-2020 01:44 PM


LBD И (and ) Ibewjon ? Who are you by education ?? If the wood is very damp, then the light is on at half the incandescence. Who will it kill ? Turn on your brains, Lord. What kind of fire through a light bulb ???????

- Sasha


Maybe you should educate me by doing an in depth blog on how you dry out your wood using electricity… I’m always willing to hear about revolutionary ideas!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2134 posts in 3705 days


#18 posted 09-12-2020 02:11 PM

Sasha:. I have been an industrial electrician for 42 YEARS! Is that education enough? It can KILL anyone that touches it. Voltage is not the main killer, it is current. Any uneducated person that tries this setup is in danger.

View Sasha's profile

Sasha

1242 posts in 2124 days


#19 posted 09-12-2020 04:32 PM

There is a good proverb – If you do not want evil, do not do good …......
Gentlemen, dry the tree trunks by painting over the ends with paint, or even better – fill with wax ….... Iiiii (and) wait 3 years

-- Ganchik Sasha. Life is not a draft, tomorrow you will not redo......

View Stephen's profile

Stephen

42 posts in 3757 days


#20 posted 09-12-2020 05:37 PM

Thanks. I’ll paint the ends with sealer and put them in the attic of the shop and forget them. Someday I’ll find them and wonder what they are. The older I get the less I remember. Snot fun.

-- Loving it in Tucson .... Stephen

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3494 posts in 2710 days


#21 posted 09-12-2020 05:57 PM

Do you have a extra olive branch? It’s looking like ibewjon and Sasha need one to bridge the gap between them. :)

-- Aj

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8277 posts in 3111 days


#22 posted 09-12-2020 06:49 PM

Thanks. I ll paint the ends with sealer and put them in the attic of the shop and forget them. Someday I ll find them and wonder what they are. The older I get the less I remember. Snot fun.
- Stephen

LOL – It’s easy to forget where you got a particular blank, particularly when yo have tons of them from lots of different harvests and locations. Most of my blanks get painted on the end, then at the very least, the date it was harvested is marked. Old latex paint works fine, and light colors are easy to mark on using a regular marking pen.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1443 posts in 639 days


#23 posted 09-17-2020 01:38 PM

We used to drive 2 nails through a piece of wood, hook them up to a lamp cord. Then put a hot dog across the 2 nails, plug it in and cook the hot dogs. (didn’t everybody do this?)

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4120 posts in 2134 days


#24 posted 09-17-2020 07:44 PM



We used to drive 2 nails through a piece of wood, hook them up to a lamp cord. Then put a hot dog across the 2 nails, plug it in and cook the hot dogs. (didn t everybody do this?)

- LeeRoyMan

Memories! I built several in my well spent youth 8^)

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2134 posts in 3705 days


#25 posted 09-17-2020 09:59 PM

Olive branch or not, if someone posts something that is potentially dangerous to others, I will continue to point it out. I had an employer that was ready to walk into standing water and grab a live, high voltage cable in his bare hand. I screamed at him and probably saved his life. Bare nails with live wires attached is also a potential hazzard, and could also kill, injure, or start a fire.

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

663 posts in 298 days


#26 posted 09-17-2020 10:22 PM

My only concern would be that the branches of most trees are reaction wood and not nearly as stable as wood taken from the bole or trunk. Careful what you build with it.

-- Darrel

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1131 posts in 1091 days


#27 posted 09-17-2020 10:41 PM

Lots of vodka in Russia.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#28 posted 09-18-2020 12:03 AM

Initial thoughts were self deleted after further consideration when spell checking after submitting.

Rather than waste this spot…


Olive branch or not, if someone posts something that is potentially dangerous to others, I will continue to point it out. I had an employer that was ready to walk into standing water and grab a live, high voltage cable in his bare hand. I screamed at him and probably saved his life. Bare nails with live wires attached is also a potential hazzard, and could also kill, injure, or start a fire.

- ibewjon


+1 ibe’... I delete my previous comment as I appreciate that some of the posts were in an attempt to lighten up the topic… hell, I’m one of the worst offenders of such practice…

Nevertheless I do try to evaluate some of the comments and voice my views upon what I consider unsafe recommendations. If I’m out of place, let it be, I’ll sleep happier amongst the abuse. What you do in your workshop, be on you, but if it has potential, repeat potential for danger, keep it in the confines of your workshop.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#29 posted 09-18-2020 12:31 AM

OOPS!... I did it again…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1443 posts in 639 days


#30 posted 09-18-2020 03:55 AM

I hear that Lichtenberg Burning is dangerous also! Still people post about it and do it.

I’ve never heard of the concept of drying a log that way.
I don’t think I will ever try it, but if I had a log to dry at least I now know of another method.

I am smart enough to weigh out the odds to decide whether I want to try it or not.

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

471 posts in 667 days


#31 posted 09-18-2020 08:09 PM


My only concern would be that the branches of most trees are reaction wood and not nearly as stable as wood taken from the bole or trunk. Careful what you build with it.

- Foghorn

This.

Not only will the center of the growth rings be offset toward the original top side of the limb, the wood under the “center” grew in compression, while the wood above it grew in tension. So it has tension & compression built into it already, which can release in unpredictable ways when cut into. Maybe OK for turning short lengths, but not for any boards, etc. that you want to machine straight and expect to stay that way. It’s gonna move a lot more than vertical timber will.

I am a retired Electrical Engineer. This drying technique is an excellent application for a GFCI (and perhaps AFCI) protected circuit. If handled properly, it can be done safely, but anytime bare, live conductors are exposed in unattended circumstances, the chances of a serious accident are considerable. Access to it should be by lock and key only.

I can’t comment on the drying effectiveness of this technique.

-- Andy - Arlington TX

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#32 posted 09-19-2020 01:03 AM


I am a retired Electrical Engineer. This drying technique is an excellent application for a GFCI (and perhaps AFCI) protected circuit. If handled properly, it can be done safely, but anytime bare, live conductors are exposed in unattended circumstances, the chances of a serious accident are considerable…
- AndyJ1s

I’m retired too with no on-hands qualification, but hopefully some common sense. Its in your highlighted comments that I envisioned could cause potential for concern, if not necessarily danger. This ”live nail process” would not be a 5 minute undertaking and by definition, the setup would be left unattended… and one may not have control over who might enter the workshop over the duration… it’s all hypothetical, however, that’s why there’s a definition of accident in (most) dictionaries.

I appreciate your confirmation of my fears… I have said all I need to say and have no desire to get into any pissing contest over this… as they say, like in shopping, ”buyer” beware!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4804 posts in 2534 days


#33 posted 09-19-2020 11:17 AM

It appears that everybody has forgotten the original question about drying a limb.

Some suggested waxing the ends, painting the ends, making slabs or planks and air drying.

I see that my friend Sasha suggested another method to speed up the process and he gets taken to court over it.

Sasha told me a couple years ago about a saying they have in Russia and this is a quote

“When you Americans want a tool, you go out and buy it, when we want a tool, we make it”

That pretty much sums up the home made method he suggests.

Just because one does something differently and possibly dangerously doesn’t mean it’s for everybody.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5952 posts in 1732 days


#34 posted 09-19-2020 09:20 PM


It appears that everybody has forgotten the original question about drying a limb.
- recycle1943

Sorry recycle, I don’t think we have… I believe sufficient advice has been given and without rehashing all the replies, I believe the author has taken some advice and acted accordingly… Further suggestions is just icing on then cake.

However, effort in trying to right a wrong is never wasted.
Nothing wrong with doing something different, however, suggesting dangerous practices is irresponsible. After all he has no idea who he is passing his “briliant” ideas onto. Sasha might live by himself and it might be safe for him. A household with kids would not… I’m sure Sasha took all that into consideration when making his suggestion.
Nevertheless, I do respect you for coming to your buddy’s defense.

Sorry Stephen if this reads like you might be easily led into unsafe practice.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Stephen's profile

Stephen

42 posts in 3757 days


#35 posted 09-20-2020 05:22 PM

I typed a few sarcastic replies and deleted them all. Your welcome.
Really, thanks for the advice.
I had a new guy on my crew once who kept suggesting “better” ways of doing the job. When I didn’t change our procedure he huffed, “well, it doesn’t do any good to make a suggestion around here”.
There are lots of ways to do every job. Live long and prosper.

-- Loving it in Tucson .... Stephen

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