LumberJocks

All Replies on newbie need input

  • Advertise with us
View Karda's profile

newbie need input

by Karda
posted 07-21-2020 03:34 AM


19 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1782 posts in 3767 days


#1 posted 07-21-2020 10:57 AM

Mike,
I’d say a fairly simple box made from frame & panel, 1 with a solid wood panel and then 3 made with panel groove opened so that you can insert glass. Make usual panel and use a rabbeting bit to open the groove. For the top, you can just make a solid wood piece to fit the top and then add a 1/4 piece the size of the opening to lock in the top. Not sure what sort of bulb it’s running, if incandescent likely need to open part of the top for heat, but if led probably not.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1826 posts in 1506 days


#2 posted 07-21-2020 12:49 PM

No groove. Use lexan instead of glass and use a small dab of clear adhesive around the edges to hold it to the wood frames. On the back use mirrored lexan facing in to reflect the light back out.

You’ll also need to drill a hole out the back for the cord. If you put feet on it the cord can go out the bottom. Either way the hole needs to be big enough for the plug, not just the wire.

At least one side needs to be openable for access. You’re not going to want to permanently seal it in for transport, cleaning, bulb changes, etc. This usually implies hinges, a catch, and a knob.

Go for surface mounting your hinges. No mortising needed. Just be sure to predrilled the holes. Use steel screws instead of brass. If this is your first use of brass screws you will break one or two during install.

You may not need a catch if the door stays closed by itself. A magnetic catch is ugly but easy to install. Put it in the middle aligned with the knob to prevent the door from wracking as you open it against the pull of the catch.

The plan shown above is easy without the grooves as only simple crosscutting is needed.

Since this is intended as a display piece no great strength is needed so simple butt joints should work for 1×2 stock (3/4×1-1/2 actual). You’ll need a pair of F-clamps to hold things for an hour while the glue dries. Try to borrow them if you can.

Use regular yellow carpenter’s glue, cover the end evenly, thinly, and 100% coverage. A little squeezeout is good, if too much clean with damp rag and use less next time. A small piece of lexan is a better glue spreader than your finger. Areas that are glue smeared won’t take finish.

Another benefit to gluing the lexan in, is that the lexan can be added last, after the project is assembled and stained/finished.

Final assembly is a chore. Holding four frames in place while trying to glue (or nail) is going to require four hands and patience.

If you have access to a brad nailer this would be a good time to dig it out. Use a dab of putty to fill the nail holes. Do not try to make your own out of sawdust & glue – it won’t look good. Don’t try to nail by hand, the frames will bust.

Screws can be used but need to be piloted full depth for the screws used. 1-1/2 #4 or #6 flathead screws should be ok. If the wood is soft a power driver should self sink the heads otherwise a cheap chamfering bit can be used. Lube the screws with a little soap or wax before driving.

If you better half doesn’t like screwholes you can countersink and cap or back to gluing.

Make an assembly corner to work against and build horizontally with the widest piece face down. Glue a side on edge next and then the top and bottom pieces. The ends will hold the 3rd side in place as the glue dries. The door can then be added last after the rest of the case hase dried.

Take your time, retain all your fingers, have fun & good luck!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#3 posted 07-22-2020 03:23 AM

sorry about the late response, for some reason I am not getting notifications even though i am watching. thanks for the diagram, that is what I was thinking about but could put the frames together, tomorrow I am getting wife to get her lamp out so i can take measurements. the diagram and the instructions give me a good start. Could i use ha;f lap or bridal joints and I was thinking instead of nails using pegs will that work. I’ll post pics if i ever get it done. Where would I look for lexan. I know a lot of places have Plexiglas but never looked for lexan Thanks Mike

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

472 posts in 673 days


#4 posted 07-22-2020 04:52 PM

Glass is usually installed in a rabbet, not a groove, in a panel, and secured with glazier’s points (little diamond-shaped, sharp metal pieces that are pressed into the side of the rabbet to hold the glass in place.

For exterior, weatherproof installations, the rabbet is on the outside, and filled with glazing putty to seal the joint between glass and wood, thus filling the rabbet and preventing water from pooling in it.

For most interior installations (e.g. cabinet doors), the rabbet is on the inside (therefore the glass is installed from the inside), and glazing putty is not usually used, especially if the wood is not painted. Small molding can be installed, mitered at the corners, to hide the glazier’s points, if desired (more often in an eye-level cabinet door that is often opened, making the back-side of the glass door more visible.) Do not glue the molding in place. You want it to be easy to remove in case the glass is broken.

If the frame is painted, glazing putty is usually easier and faster to apply than molding, and is painted to match.

-- Andy - Arlington TX

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

680 posts in 304 days


#5 posted 07-22-2020 05:00 PM

I know this is a woodworking forum, but I would likely build it completely out of Lexan with no wood.

-- Darrel

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1782 posts in 3767 days


#6 posted 07-22-2020 05:24 PM

with panel groove opened so that you can insert glass. Make usual panel and use a rabbeting bit to open the groove. For the top, you can just make a solid wood piece to fit the top and then add a 1/4 piece the size of the opening to lock in the top.


The thought was a usual panel but use a rabbeting bit to open the groove where the glass/lexan would go. Sorry if this was not clear in first post. You’ll need to make the groove if you use the traditional method to make a T&G rail & stile frame for a panel. Once glued, you would use the rabetting bit to open the grove to make it a dado for the glass/lexan. As for any concerns of opening. I STILL think a lift off top is the easiest design for bulb change etc, and unless you have a way to set a microwave dish to direct power into the cabinet, yes you will need to drill or form some sort of hole for the power cable…. (the next sentence of my thoughts has been deleted for the sake or forum harmony).

- ChefHDAN

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#7 posted 07-22-2020 10:13 PM

what i am thinking is an open top kinda like lattice and make it a lift off plug fit for bulb change and have a hinged front. Unless i can come up with a cheap rabbit plane I will have to use my TS for thew rabbits or make them by hand. My wife has approved of the design so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1782 posts in 3767 days


#8 posted 07-23-2020 12:32 PM

Mike, check out this video for making the side pieces. As for cutting out the interior side of the groove to make it a rabbet you can install the glass into, you can mark and use a hand saw to cut the depth and a chisel to remove the long side. Or if you have a router, then get a rabbetting bit== and it will be a super simple job to just assemble the frame and then with it laying on a table clamped down you zip the other side of the groove of. If you don’t have a router…. well…. then I think this may be the job to get one.. Perhaps the Dewalt 611 $70 more it also comes in a 2 base kit, which I have and really like for the smaller jobs when a 1/4 shank bit is okay. Good Luck

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1782 posts in 3767 days


#9 posted 07-23-2020 02:27 PM

MIke, sorry, just noticed I forgot the youtube link for the video, see it here, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdImx4h0MWo&t=381s

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#10 posted 07-23-2020 07:47 PM

Thanks for the video, I may do it that way, I’ll have to experiment. Are the any videos that show how to make a bix with 4 panels. when do i put the glass and back in and how do I fasten them. thanks mike

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#11 posted 09-19-2020 04:09 PM

Hi, I am still trying to decide if I can do this. I have never done a project this intricate or complicated. The cost is huge and if I screw it up It will be a big waste, but I do have some questions. What do I use for a bottom and how do I fasten to the bottom, How do I make the top, my wife wants to use the lamp. Also i don’t have a router Thanks for putting up with my questions mike

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1826 posts in 1506 days


#12 posted 09-19-2020 04:35 PM

Make a small prototype first out of cheap materials. Omit the glass and hardware and just see if you can make something smaller as a shakedown. The process should be the same even if the size isn’t. Once you’ve done the first, the second full size with real materials should be a snap.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#13 posted 09-19-2020 09:40 PM

what should I use for the bottom, somebody mentioned making an open slot so i can drop the glass doun in after the panel is made. How do you do that and without a router

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1826 posts in 1506 days


#14 posted 09-20-2020 03:52 AM

The glass groove is cut while the stock is long. One end can be left unglued so the end and glass can be removed and replaced.

Normally the groove is cut on the table saw, possibly in multiple passes.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#15 posted 09-20-2020 04:12 AM

I understand cutting the groves in the stiles it is the grove in thew top rails that confuse me

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1826 posts in 1506 days


#16 posted 09-20-2020 04:21 AM

Both are cut from the same stock …

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#17 posted 09-20-2020 04:55 AM

the way I understand it is the panel is dropped into the slot then the top stile is inserted that captures the panel is there a way to drop the panel in place or remove it with the top stile in place

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2147 posts in 3711 days


#18 posted 09-20-2020 02:30 PM

Just be sure the top has holes or vents of some kind to allow heat to escape.

View Karda's profile

Karda

2607 posts in 1471 days


#19 posted 09-20-2020 03:21 PM

yea got that far. What i want to do is know every step I am goiung to have to do to make this. there will be suprises but not so many if I know what I should do

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com