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I am selling my entire home shop

by BlackRock
posted 04-09-2020 03:35 PM


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52 replies

52 replies so far

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WoodenDreams

1065 posts in 680 days


#1 posted 04-09-2020 04:07 PM

Too bad your not closer to South Dakota, I’m looking for extra equipment.

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CaptainKlutz

3153 posts in 2264 days


#2 posted 04-09-2020 08:14 PM

Nice collection. Sorry to hear can no longer use it. :(

Prices are not something I would be interested in paying in my local area?

- Delta 13” planer parts are almost impossible to find as the size has become an albatross in market. Be very lucky to get $400 in my area. Although I really like the cart with rollers!

- Will get a decent 50% of retail price for DJ-20 as used parallel bed jointers are sort of rare, as long as it was not Brazil made Invicta with zero parts available.

- Accessories are really lucky to sell for 40% of new when sold separately. Selling as package will result is prices of 10-20% of new. So asking 60% makes the overall lot way too expensive.

- Anytime an older Unisaw is posted on my CL for over $1200, it sits unsold for months – regardless of how many accessories are included. Average selling price for Unisaw has been ~$800 lately. The big issue is market is flooded with Unisaw from commercial operations where insurance carriers require latest safety features (sawstop). It’s been tough last two year for used Unsiaw prices in south west US.

Know you want to maximize your selling price, sorry if the above is depressing.

Best Luck with sale.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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BlackRock

4 posts in 86 days


#3 posted 04-10-2020 12:12 PM

Wow! I’m not sure why you felt the need to poison my post based on your local pricing/buying experience in the southwest. The Philadelphia, New Jersey, New York, Baltimore/DC area is quite different.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1639 posts in 3619 days


#4 posted 04-10-2020 01:23 PM



Wow! I m not sure why you felt the need to poison my post based on your local pricing/buying experience in the southwest. The Philadelphia, New Jersey, New York, Baltimore/DC area is quite different.
- BlackRock

Actually, Cap’n is right on the nose with his comments, you’re a reasonable drive away from me and I looked through everything when you first posted but didn’t reply as I do believe you’re asking pretty high I’m shopping for an 8” jointer and I have been seeing them in the $500 $600 range

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1360 posts in 1358 days


#5 posted 04-10-2020 01:30 PM

Rule of thumb for used is 1/2, not 2/3. 60% of list is high in any area.

IRS straight line depreciates capital equipment over 20 years. Technically the resale on tools older than 20 years is nil.

Sell it for what you can get, but 60% of list isn’t going to get you lots of bites.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#6 posted 04-10-2020 01:41 PM

Where all the tools bought new?

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7873 posts in 3683 days


#7 posted 04-10-2020 02:07 PM

Before any of us start inferring that a 50% of new price is the fair price, PLEASE remember that you should “start” with what the new price is “as of today”, and not what it was way back when originally purchased.

For example:
Currently at Acmetools.com a 10In 3HP Unisaw with 36In Biesemeyer Fence is listed at $2,649.99

https://www.acmetools.com/shop/tools/delta-36-l336

And that suggested 50% of “NEW” price, comes in at $1,324.95 making the OP’s “asking price” of $1,099 sound quite fair at JUST 41% of NEW price.
Just saying…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1178 posts in 496 days


#8 posted 04-10-2020 02:18 PM

I don’t think the prices are that far off. Maybe a tad high on accessories.
The tools look to be in great shape.
I always try to sell something for what I think it’s worth. I have never tried the ” % of ” method. Makes no sense.
The tool is worth what you can sell it for.
I think you’re at a good starting point,
and with the willingness to negotiate you’ll have no problems getting them sold.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#9 posted 04-10-2020 02:25 PM



I don t think the prices are that far off. Maybe a tad high on accessories.
The tools look to be in great shape.
I always try to sell something for what I think it s worth. I have never tried the ” % of ” method. Makes no sense.
The tool is worth what you can sell it for.
I think you re at a good starting point,
and with the willingness to negotiate you ll have no problems getting them sold.

- LeeRoyMan

That’s all one Can do is try a price and see what happens. I’ve had those Kreg clamps of nine for sale for Some time now. You want them you pay for them. They work just fine in my tool collection.

Some of the tools are high. I have some of the tools listed..The DC-33 is way too high, but who knows it may be worth it to somebody. Just have to wait and see…

View BigAl98's profile

BigAl98

229 posts in 3808 days


#10 posted 04-10-2020 03:05 PM

I’m from the NJ/Pennsylvania area and you seem very optimistic on prices…but its a strategy, start high and work your way down. It just takes more patience than most have. Wood working in the metro areas is a dying hobby from my experience (evidenced by lack of woodworking stores), however the density of the population is higher. And its always supply and demand, I would guess demand is way down now. If you get Amish/Mennonites interested, they are notorious bargainers. In the end I’m sure you’ll be selling for lower some items, as you get sick and tired of doing it.
Good luck!

-- Al,Midwest -To thine own self be true

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Albert

542 posts in 4359 days


#11 posted 04-10-2020 03:16 PM

Prices are ALWAYS too high unless you’re selling then they are ALWAYS too low.

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GR8HUNTER

7538 posts in 1482 days


#12 posted 04-10-2020 03:36 PM

i dont think the prices are that high here in this area the thing that turned me off was have to buy the whole shop :<((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Madmark2

1360 posts in 1358 days


#13 posted 04-10-2020 04:17 PM

BigAl98: Amish/Mennonite don’t use anything but hand, water, or animal powered tools. They tend to make their own tools from scratch. Not much of a market there except for chisels, planes, and hammers. Certainly nothing with a cord on it.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View John_'s profile

John_

250 posts in 2475 days


#14 posted 04-10-2020 04:18 PM

You can always start high and come down, but it’s kind of hard to raise the price….

What I usually do when selling something on craigslist or whatever is start out with what I would like to get for the item (actually a little higher to allow some wiggle room) and then I make it clear to any interested party that I will be dropping the price by ‘X’ amount every week until it is sold. Works for me, but your mileage may vary king of thing

View BlackRock's profile

BlackRock

4 posts in 86 days


#15 posted 04-10-2020 04:31 PM

I will clarify that the 2/3 of new rule of thumb was something that is extremely relevant when attending auctions/estate sales.

One great thing about being self-employed living in the northeast is that there are always auctions/estate sales with woodworking equipment. Over the last 20 years I was constantly buying and selling to upgrade my equipment when the opportunity arose. Most people don’t go to these auctions because many times they are on a weekday morning. The people that do show up tend to be serious bidders and it’s easy to get into a bidding war if the equipment is in good condition.

More often than not, the equipment listed for sale is incomplete with little to no pictures available before the day of the auction. When you get to an auction, you need to assess everything and come up with a fair price. Once the auction starts, it’s very important to know how high to bid if multiple people are bidding.

So to clarify, my pricing is based on my history of buying and selling as I was upgrading my shop. The definition of a “fair” price can differ greatly based on whether you are the buyer or seller.

I will add that I have a few people who are supposed to be coming over to look at the whole shop in the next week or so. If that falls through, then I will separate the equipment for sale. I was initially looking to sell everything separately but with the whole Covid-19 pandemic, I thought it would be in my best interest to attempt to sell it all together to limit unnecessary exposure to other individuals.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#16 posted 04-10-2020 05:11 PM

Some photos….

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JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#17 posted 04-10-2020 05:25 PM

Bought this in 2005 from a woodworker 100 miles away. Price was $425 and I have watched ebay and craigslist since it’s purchase just incase I could bug one cheap for parts. In good working condition, complete was $600.
This was the highest in 15 years and generally go for $100-$250…

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

90 posts in 154 days


#18 posted 04-10-2020 07:15 PM

I agree that sales in this current environment are off. Be patient. I had one table saw too many, so put both on craigslist for what I felt was a fair price. Clean the machines, and photograph well, post, and again be patient. I had plenty of low ball offers, but declined them. Last week the Unisaw sold for 1400.

Again, unless you are in a pinch for the funds, or need to vacate the premise soon, take your time and be patient.

View Walker's profile

Walker

384 posts in 1241 days


#19 posted 04-10-2020 07:37 PM

Have you looked into selling these through an auction house? You seem to have knowledge of the process. You could be more likely to get the price you want that way, and you’re pretty likely to sell the entire shop in one day. Of course, with the current pandemic you might have to wait a while. I went to one a few months ago and the machines all went for decent prices. There was a bunch of hardwood too, that also sold for decent prices.

-- ~Walker

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pottz

9845 posts in 1754 days


#20 posted 04-11-2020 03:30 AM

dude if i was within driving distance that saw would be sold right now.your prices are about right for the condition your showing us,start where your at and come down if needed.some one is gonna score some nice equipment at a great price,good luck and my condolences for having to sell.may your shop rest in peace my friend.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6575 posts in 2490 days


#21 posted 04-11-2020 04:27 AM

Sorry you felt offended by those offering real value advise. Lots and lots of folks on this site have moved, flipped and restored lots of iron always keeping an eye on markets values and trend. The Captain is certainly one and has perfectly restored many Unisaws and p!aners. I’ve had three myself, no one is trying to poison your post but rather educate you on what is standard operating procedure in selling used wood working machines. If you’ve become emotionally attached to these in any way, it’s going to cloud your judgement. 50% the price of new is how it works like it or not and you can’t base it off 50% the price of a brand new Unisaw now, they’re simply different machines. If you want to move them quickly and as a single lot, be prepared to knock off an additional 10-20% as some wanting one of two machines would likely flip redundant ones but only if it’s worth it, the chance of someone needing everything that you happen to have inclusive of the accessories you’ve chosen while having nothing are extraordinarily slim.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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fuigb

583 posts in 3727 days


#22 posted 04-11-2020 06:26 AM


BigAl98: Amish/Mennonite don t use anything but hand, water, or animal powered tools. They tend to make their own tools from scratch. Not much of a market there except for chisels, planes, and hammers. Certainly nothing with a cord on it.

- Madmark2


^ not true, at least not with the folks I know / am related too. Both are much more modern and inclined to use modern tools than their quaint public face may suggest. The power to run the equipment probably comes from a diesel generator in the “old order” shops, but the equipment absolutely is corded where the output is intended for the retail market.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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CWWoodworking

776 posts in 948 days


#23 posted 04-11-2020 11:10 AM


BigAl98: Amish/Mennonite don t use anything but hand, water, or animal powered tools. They tend to make their own tools from scratch. Not much of a market there except for chisels, planes, and hammers. Certainly nothing with a cord on it.

- Madmark2

^ not true, at least not with the folks I know / am related too. Both are much more modern and inclined to use modern tools than their quaint public face may suggest. The power to run the equipment probably comes from a diesel generator in the “old order” shops, but the equipment absolutely is corded where the output is intended for the retail market.

- fuigb

Heck the bigger manufacturers have more CNCs than anything else. The only chisels are the ones they put on the front of their 20$ catalog.

Amish companies are just like everyone else, some good, some bad. The difference is they have everyone duped into thinking, “it’s Amish, it has to be good.”

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Tony_S

1329 posts in 3852 days


#24 posted 04-11-2020 12:34 PM


Heck the bigger manufacturers have more CNCs than anything else. The only chisels are the ones they put on the front of their 20$ catalog.

Amish companies are just like everyone else, some good, some bad. The difference is they have everyone duped into thinking, “it’s Amish, it has to be good.”

- CWWoodworking

Amish built….just another cabinet/furniture company now. They rode a horse and carriage to the shop. Thats where the mystique ends.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View AMZ's profile

AMZ

107 posts in 159 days


#25 posted 04-11-2020 12:39 PM


BigAl98: Amish/Mennonite don t use anything but hand, water, or animal powered tools. They tend to make their own tools from scratch. Not much of a market there except for chisels, planes, and hammers. Certainly nothing with a cord on it.

- Madmark2

They will use air, also, even if air is produced by an electric motor, or in my case, a gasoline engine. Several decades ago, I had a friend that owned a sawmill, with all Amish employees. He ventured into pallet making and asked if I could make him an air powered drill press. Bought an air motor from MSC, replacing the electric motor with it. I used a ball valve to regulate speed, turning the quill 1:1. Drill speed regulation was so slick, I was tempted to convert my shop drill press to air.

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AMZ

107 posts in 159 days


#26 posted 04-11-2020 12:46 PM

To the OP, the highest $$$ you can get will be established by the asking price! You can aleays come down, but you will never get more. Will you put off potential buyers? Maybe yes, maybe no: I never accept asking price as what I pay, but will offer a fair price (I’ve purchased a fair amount of equipment through the years, mostly machine shop, but also wood shop). Through th years, a well maintained, fully operational piece will being 50% of replacement. Pieces will issues rapidly go down. The accessories? Much, much less as they may have value to you, but the buyer may not see that value, and for them, 10 – 25% f replacement, at best.

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John_

250 posts in 2475 days


#27 posted 04-11-2020 10:52 PM

I bought this Delta RC-33 Planer in 1987 for the tidy sum of $911. Finally sold it in 2014 for around $500

But here is the deal. $911 in 1987 was worth about $1,898 in 2014. Something to think about…

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John_

250 posts in 2475 days


#28 posted 04-11-2020 11:00 PM


Some photos….

- JackDuren

Here is your $1,215 planer in 2005 in today’s dollars

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pottz

9845 posts in 1754 days


#29 posted 04-11-2020 11:50 PM

but as the old saying goes,something is only worth what someone will pay.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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CaptainKlutz

3153 posts in 2264 days


#30 posted 04-12-2020 12:09 AM

First:
My apologies if I offended the OP.
Maybe I didn’t make it clear, was only sharing my opinion.
And in America, everyone is entitled to one.

Second:
I don’t think the sale in poisoned. Always ask high, and negotiate lower.
You did what you thought was right, and I disagree. Who really cares?
And as some folks say: there is sucker born every minute. If your are willing to wait long enough to find the right buyer, than might even sell the tools for more than asked?
But I doubt it. Wood workers are notoriously cheap.
Good luck nonetheless.

Third: Inflation? Don’t forget about deflation too!
Cost to make these tools has deflated from what it used to cost.
Which is the always important point – Value of money.

Even though inflation might make something worth more comparing cost of currency, it does not matter when you can buy a tool that does same job, for same price as 20 years ago.

For only $985 of today’s USD, you can buy a 15” tool with more capability than an old 13” Delta:

https://www.grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-15-3-HP-Heavy-Duty-Planer/G0815

And before you come out waving the made in America flag: When folks like Grizzly and others starting dumping tools for half what Delta was charging, they were forced to use cheaper components made overseas. Back in 80’s the US models were made with overseas components, unlike the older tools made in 50-60’s.

Making the comparison worse, American quality suffered once the 60’s ‘hippy’ generation started running businesses in 80’s. Making products good enough was all they needed to compete with junk from Asia. Fast forward to today, Taiwan is world class manufacturer of machine tools. Thanks to capitalist desire to make more money by using cheapest labor, even China has learned how to compete when quality is key purchase decision.

I’ve rebuilt one RC-33. The fit/finish in cast iron was same as what I found on newer model Taiwan made Powermatic, Grizzly, and General; 15” planers I’ve refurbished. You can’t convince me there is $900 value in 13” planer that can be replaced with brand new 15” with warranty for nearly same money? Especially when those same 15” planers are sold used for $400-$600 on CL all time. I can defend this cost comparison with more data if someone needs it. :-)

Thanks for reading.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#31 posted 04-12-2020 04:44 PM

Has anyone use the Grizzly 15” in a production environment for 20 years. Id like to know if it holds up. The Delta is proven. I ran a full time shop for 2 years making cabinets with the Delta. A lot of planing with face frames and doors. I ran the shop for a total of 13 years part time.. I finally shut it down after I started making furniture full time.

Nothing against the Grizzly but personally I would look at the Delta first and a second time before going to Grizxly…

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recycle1943

4469 posts in 2391 days


#32 posted 04-12-2020 05:11 PM


Heck the bigger manufacturers have more CNCs than anything else. The only chisels are the ones they put on the front of their 20$ catalog.

Amish companies are just like everyone else, some good, some bad. The difference is they have everyone duped into thinking, “it’s Amish, it has to be good.”

- CWWoodworking

Amish built….just another cabinet/furniture company now. They rode a horse and carriage to the shop. Thats where the mystique ends.

- Tony_S

That’s not always true, a lot have gone to Yoder Toters – ie: 8 seater vans, pick ups, of course all driven by english

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

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Tony_S

1329 posts in 3852 days


#33 posted 04-12-2020 05:23 PM


Amish built….just another cabinet/furniture company now. They rode a horse and carriage to the shop. Thats where the mystique ends.

- Tony_S

That s not always true, a lot have gone to Yoder Toters – ie: 8 seater vans, pick ups, of course all driven by english
- recycle1943


Geez…thanks Dick! Now you’ve totally ruined it for me! lol!

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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CaptainKlutz

3153 posts in 2264 days


#34 posted 04-12-2020 05:57 PM

Has anyone use the Grizzly 15” in a production environment for 20 years. Id like to know if it holds up.
- JackDuren

No direct experience, but will share this FWIW:
Bought a used Grizzly G1021 from a cabinet shop retirement auction/sale in Tucson over a decade ago. The owner swore it was great machine for 15-17 years of use?

There is one weak spot on ALL the 15” planers I have rebuilt. The cabinet shop I bought the Grizzly had to fix this known weakness after ~8 years of use.

Issue is the drive chain between the gear box and out feed roller does not have an idler on it. The chain between the feed rollers does have an idler, so it is really weird to not be included? As they chain wears, and stretches it needs to be replaced. But like all shops, they don’t check/fix it, till it’s borked.
When the chain stretches enough it jumps of sprocket and occasionally breaks a tooth. Buy a new sprocket, new chain, it’s back in service. Cabinet shop owner was really proud that his maintenance guy had added an idler wheel to prevent the problem happening again when I was inspecting at auction. :)

Some of the Chinese produced G0453, added an idler sprocket to prevent the issue. But not all different G0453 flavors have it. There are threads on forums with DIY fix. For the (4) 15” planers I have rebuilt, I buy $15 in parts for Grizzly G0453 and make the improvement on all machines I touch (even Powermatic PM15 was missing the idler).

Funny thing, Bought a Delta DC-380 for $100 that had been moth-balled into storage from a Phoenix Cabinet plant for same reason, broken tooth on out-feed roller drive. Employee I bought it from, told me it lasted about 8 years, the boss decided it was depreciated on the accounting books, and bought a new one.

Another thing worth mentioning. All the 15” planers, and the newer US made Delta RC-33 use some of same part designs. One annoying thing: they all use an oil-lite bearing/bushing for the feed rollers. Have to replace every one I find as they wear out due lack of proper manual oiling. Had seen both a General and Powermatic with 20+ year old bushings worn so bad the feed roller was rubbing on the gear box. They both were still in service before I bought them home?

I think the 20 year mark is interesting narrative?
You can not expect a wood working tool to last 20 years without repairs, or new bearings?
Have been supporting high volume mfg for many decades. Machines need regular repairs. Bearings need replaced every 7-10 years, sooner with high rotation speeds.

Sorry if it seems I beat the planner discussion to death? :-)
Have spent way to much time inside the US/Taiwan/Chinese made planers; ALL the 12-15” planers I have seen inside commercial environments ALL last same length of time regardless if Delta or another brand. Even the old Parks 12” planer needs new bearing every 5-10 years in a production shop. Only machines I see that last longer without repairs are monster 20-24” industrial 7-10HP 3 phase planers?
YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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CWWoodworking

776 posts in 948 days


#35 posted 04-12-2020 06:56 PM

To the OP, something is worth it if you can find a buyer. Simple as that.

If you were in my area, I would consider your table saw.

I just did a Craigslist search for table saw. 200 miles out and I found 2 that were ok. One was what looked like a 70s Powermatic. Still wanting a 1000.

In your area, it might be more of a buyers market.

View AMZ's profile

AMZ

107 posts in 159 days


#36 posted 04-12-2020 07:23 PM

Oil-Lite bronze bushings should not be used in this application. They are made from oil-impregnated powder metal bronze, and obtain lubricating on bearing surfaces by turning on a shaft, with heat causing oil to flow to surface. When stopped, the oil returns to inside.

A cast bronze, with a “Zerk” (grease fitting), is correct for this application, as feed rollers do not turn fast enough to cause oil flow.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4724 posts in 2758 days


#37 posted 04-13-2020 01:01 PM

Wow…This guy who came on here to try to sell his shop really got schooled. It is tough having to give up a hobby because of health issues and sell the tools you have spent time with.

This thread took a lot of twists and turns and the guy probably won’t be back.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#38 posted 04-13-2020 03:03 PM

I hope the guy sells and gets a fair price. I was just trying to show him a fair selling price from a tool catalog from I think 1995. 60% of depends on where the retail price came from to start is where people become alarmed.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1178 posts in 496 days


#39 posted 04-13-2020 03:17 PM

20%,40%, 60% is all hogwash
It doesn’t matter what you paid for a tool or when or how old it is.

It’s what the tool is worth in the condition it is in.
When I look at a tool I ask myself, can I get a better one for the price their asking?
If not, then it’s worth it.

And what I pay for a tool doesn’t really matter.
3 or 4 years down the road a few hundred either way doesn’t matter, what matters is look at the tool I have.
I don’t mind spend a few hundred more if it’s a good tool.
Find it, see it, buy it, it’s yours, you got what you want, nothing else matters.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

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JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#40 posted 04-13-2020 04:23 PM

Hard to find tools can bring a good price. I came across a powermatic mortiser floor model at 50%. I called and the ad had been up and hour and the guy said he help load it a half hr after he put it on Craigslist. Some things are just hot items.

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Eric

212 posts in 1007 days


#41 posted 04-13-2020 07:22 PM

LOL,I can see why OWWM.org doesn’t allow pricing conversations. A good example is the Captain quoting prices in a region where woodworkers go to die as if that’s reflective of the OP’s situation, too funny!

-- Eric

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JCamp

1179 posts in 1320 days


#42 posted 04-13-2020 10:18 PM

I personally think all the prices are pretty good. Don’t see any red flags so hopefully you’ll get some good offers.
Nazareth Pa huh….. don’t happen to play a Martin do ya? I think that’s where they make there American made guitars

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View BlackRock's profile

BlackRock

4 posts in 86 days


#43 posted 04-18-2020 06:35 PM

It took 8 days but the shop is sold.

Thanks for all the replies.

For those that are curious, I sold it to 4 buyers with 2 of them buying almost everything. One buyer came from 3 1/2 hours away from upstate New York while another came from New Jersey. Everything sold for full asking price.

I had over 150 emails combined from my listing on Craigslist and Letgo. Lots of very passionate woodworkers around my part of the country.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4724 posts in 2758 days


#44 posted 04-18-2020 08:01 PM

Sad that you gave up woodworking but glad the sale worked out for you.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

4096 posts in 3878 days


#45 posted 04-19-2020 01:47 AM



Sad that you gave up woodworking but glad the sale worked out for you.

- Redoak49

Indeed, on both counts. I’m hoping that one of my sons (who has actually expressed interest) wants all my stuff.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3006 posts in 3713 days


#46 posted 04-19-2020 05:36 AM

Some of the comments boarder on sad comedy.

It’s a safe bet they would not sell their five hundred dollar Rotex for $250, in spite of their 50% claim.

As to Unisaws, they come and go. I’d ask twelve for mine and figure with the kick down rear fence, over arm guard and dust collection, Merlin Splitter, Ibox Jig, Griz tennoner, Incre miter, dado, blades etc etc. I figure my saw would not be for the screw grandma bargain hunter but for the saw dust maker smart enough to say the fact PMs and Unisaws only last a month before going out the door at a thousand or more, mine with a couple thousand in extras would be a bargain.

And the shop isn’t doing anything else in the mean time.

My PM band saw was nine when I bought it. I have NEVER seen one go for less than seven.

In short, many of the remarks above MAY apply to an area, but they may not. After all, the person making the comment doesn’t have access to much of any info about the sales, aside from watching an item sit on the list a while.

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Woodmaster1

1471 posts in 3356 days


#47 posted 04-19-2020 09:08 AM

Start high you can’t negotiate a higher price only a lower price.

View Eric's profile

Eric

212 posts in 1007 days


#48 posted 04-19-2020 03:40 PM

LMAO, where’s the captain?

-- Eric

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CaptainKlutz

3153 posts in 2264 days


#49 posted 04-19-2020 04:44 PM



LMAO, where s the captain?

- Eric

ROFLMAO

If tools and accessories actually sold at full price: Just proves there is sucker born every minute. :-0)

I buy/sell used equipment as a hobby. Can support my used equipment pricing evaluations with real CL and auction sales data in my area. Can you?
East coast must be starved for tools, or everyone is too impatient to look for bargains? No bleeping way a smart shopper would pay that much. But then, We all know ignorant shopper’s over pay for stuff all time.

Wish BlackRock a happy life, where ever it takes them!

I shed a tear for those that bought the tools. #unwatch

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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JackDuren

1209 posts in 1729 days


#50 posted 04-22-2020 02:51 AM

Nobody knows what they sold for. Only the buyer knows the truth….

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