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View cmacnaughton's profile

Choosing a new router

by cmacnaughton
posted 10-28-2019 02:08 PM


23 replies so far

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2658 posts in 2908 days


#1 posted 10-28-2019 02:18 PM

My Bosch 1617evs in the fixed base adjusts well in the router table. Requires dropping to the right range and then adjusting. Great for hobby use.

Take a look at the HF trim router. For ~&30 its an HF gem. Takes patience to get the right depth and not vs, but vs not really needed for small bit trim work.

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#2 posted 10-28-2019 02:26 PM



My Bosch 1617evs in the fixed base adjusts well in the router table. Requires dropping to the right range and then adjusting. Great for hobby use.

Take a look at the HF trim router. For ~&30 its an HF gem. Takes patience to get the right depth and not vs, but vs not really needed for small bit trim work.

- OSU55


Thanks for the insight. I need a plunge base for the trim router if I’m using it for mortises. Does the HF come with a plunge base?

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

6580 posts in 3411 days


#3 posted 10-28-2019 04:23 PM

I would go with the bigger motor (the 13 amp, usually labeled 2 1/4 HP) for your first option. I’m only familiar with the Milwaukee fixed base and the Triton relative to table mounts. The Milwaukee is very good, but the Triton has above the table access that I think you won’t find on the others. Of course, the Triton is a plunge only router…so pulling it out for handheld use might be a lot more cumbersome. I kinda like your plan B, get a larger router for the table and use the 690 for handheld use…they are very good for that service. Throw the Milwaukee 5625 into your considerations for a big router is you go that way.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1782 posts in 3768 days


#4 posted 10-28-2019 04:38 PM

Take a look at Router Raiser
It can modify most all plunge routers to an above the table adjust feature. I’ve got it in my 3.5hp PC plunge that is unfortunately discontinued, but as a hobbyist I’ve never been disappointed by it.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#5 posted 10-28-2019 04:57 PM



I would go with the bigger motor (the 13 amp, usually labeled 2 1/4 HP) for your first option. I m only familiar with the Milwaukee fixed base and the Triton relative to table mounts. The Milwaukee is very good, but the Triton has above the table access that I think you won t find on the others. Of course, the Triton is a plunge only router…so pulling it out for handheld use might be a lot more cumbersome. I kinda like your plan B, get a larger router for the table and use the 690 for handheld use…they are very good for that service. Throw the Milwaukee 5625 into your considerations for a big router is you go that way.

- Fred Hargis


Thanks, Fred. That was my thought on the Triton as well…what good is “dual mode” if it’s a pain to take off the table every time you want to use it hand-held?


Take a look at Router Raiser
It can modify most all plunge routers to an above the table adjust feature. I ve got it in my 3.5hp PC plunge that is unfortunately discontinued, but as a hobbyist I ve never been disappointed by it.

- ChefHDAN


Thanks, Dan. That would certainly be an option if I already had a good router for table use. I’d be loath to spend nearly $100 to raise my 20 year old, 1-3/4 HP single-speed router from above the table. I can get the Bosch 1617 w/ fixed base for just $49 more and it is adjustable from above…and includes a brand new router!

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

6231 posts in 3731 days


#6 posted 10-28-2019 06:14 PM

The 611 is nice. I have a couple of them, and use them often. I would get a 2-1/4 hp kit first. They can handle just about any task you’d dream up.

1/4” collet being the main limitation of the trim routers.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#7 posted 10-28-2019 06:35 PM



The 611 is nice. I have a couple of them, and use them often. I would get a 2-1/4 hp kit first. They can handle just about any task you d dream up.

1/4” collet being the main limitation of the trim routers.

- pintodeluxe


Thanks…I am leaning toward that timeline, and getting the trim router “eventually.”

Having seen the results of the recent Incra and Sawstop posts, I’m reticent to ask for brand suggestions, haha. Leaning toward the PC 895, or the Bosch 1617, given that both allow for above-table adjustments and will fit the existing holes in my router plate.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2941 posts in 1522 days


#8 posted 10-28-2019 11:58 PM

If it were me and I had the money for a new router I’d use that money to buy a Craigslist Bosch or PC and a lift. Being able to adjust the depth with a lift vs using the fixed base in the table is, to me, invaluable and worth the investment. Unless you’re doing production work the hp of those routers are fine IMHO. Just remember that the 911 can only accommodate 1/4” bits. I have a PC that lives in the table and a 1617 and a 911 for handheld work. The PC is not variable speed but for the one or two times every 2 years that I need to slow it down I break out the cheapie HF variable speed controller. Usually, burning is a result of either a dull bit or moving the stock too slow across the bit or trying to take too big of a cut. What I have always wanted was a D-handle for my Bosch like they make for a PC. Turns out they make one that is for the 1618 that fits the 1617 that I bought for $25 from a LJ member. Using that and a Bosch edge guide works well for me.

I also have a $25 HF trim router that a 3/8” round-over lives in.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#9 posted 10-29-2019 12:12 AM


If it were me and I had the money for a new router I d use that money to buy a Craigslist Bosch or PC and a lift. Being able to adjust the depth with a lift vs using the fixed base in the table is, to me, invaluable and worth the investment. Unless you re doing production work the hp of those routers are fine IMHO. Just remember that the 911 can only accommodate 1/4” bits. I have a PC that lives in the table and a 1617 and a 911 for handheld work. The PC is not variable speed but for the one or two times every 2 years that I need to slow it down I break out the cheapie HF variable speed controller. Usually, burning is a result of either a dull bit or moving the stock too slow across the bit or trying to take too big of a cut. What I have always wanted was a D-handle for my Bosch like they make for a PC. Turns out they make one that is for the 1618 that fits the 1617 that I bought for $25 from a LJ member. Using that and a Bosch edge guide works well for me.

I also have a $25 HF trim router that a 3/8” round-over lives in.

- Andybb


Believe me, I’ve been looking on CL and FB. Around here there are a lot of Craftsman and Ryobi routers and not much else. And the occasional PC 690 which I obviously don’t need. I haven’t seen a lift once in 6 months.

As for burning, it happened on hard maple with a brand new Whiteside bit. I may have been going too slow, because it burned on the last end where I was worried about tear out and slowed down as a result. Thanks.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2941 posts in 1522 days


#10 posted 10-29-2019 01:47 AM


Believe me, I’ve been looking on CL and FB. Around here there are a lot of Craftsman and Ryobi routers and not much else. And the occasional PC 690 which I obviously don’t need. I haven’t seen a lift once in 6 months.

As for burning, it happened on hard maple with a brand new Whiteside bit. I may have been going too slow, because it burned on the last end where I was worried about tear out and slowed down as a result. Thanks.

- cmacnaughton

I was thinking a new lift and a used router.

Here’s 2 1617’s somewhere near you depending how far you want to drive.
1617
1617

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6673 posts in 1492 days


#11 posted 10-29-2019 03:42 AM

Love a D handle for edge work. I’ve always felt more in control of them, than those Mickey Mouse knobs so frequently used.

I have a variety of them used in tables, but I am fondest of a Triton 3 1/4. I just haven’t been able to pony up the grand plus I see most of the big tables, with lifts, and 3+ HP loose routers to go in a lift. The Triton can work in a lot of scenarios all across the price spectrum, offers above table adjustment, plenty of power, and for me they have worked without fail.

I also have a 2 1/2 Triton for times I need a plunge out of a table. That works well too. I once tried counting all the routers laying around. I gave up when it was apparent I have a router problem….....

-- Think safe, be safe

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2941 posts in 1522 days


#12 posted 10-29-2019 03:52 AM



Love a D handle for edge work. I ve always felt more in control of them, than those Mickey Mouse knobs so frequently used.

- therealSteveN

Yep!

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#13 posted 10-29-2019 04:12 AM


I was thinking a new lift and a used router.

Here s 2 1617 s somewhere near you depending how far you want to drive.
1617
1617

- Andybb


Ah that makes more sense. Probably more than I can afford at the moment, even for the cheaper Jess Em lift.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#14 posted 10-29-2019 04:13 AM



Love a D handle for edge work. I ve always felt more in control of them, than those Mickey Mouse knobs so frequently used.

I have a variety of them used in tables, but I am fondest of a Triton 3 1/4. I just haven t been able to pony up the grand plus I see most of the big tables, with lifts, and 3+ HP loose routers to go in a lift. The Triton can work in a lot of scenarios all across the price spectrum, offers above table adjustment, plenty of power, and for me they have worked without fail.

I also have a 2 1/2 Triton for times I need a plunge out of a table. That works well too. I once tried counting all the routers laying around. I gave up when it was apparent I have a router problem….....

- therealSteveN


Thanks, Steve. Having a router problem is better than having a no-router problem!

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2941 posts in 1522 days


#15 posted 10-29-2019 04:54 AM


Love a D handle for edge work. I ve always felt more in control of them, than those Mickey Mouse knobs so frequently used.

- therealSteveN

Yep!

The reason I love a lift so much is for making minute adjustments. A lift with a fine adjustment knob can divide an inch into 232nds. of an inch. May seem like overkill but when you are doing things like lock miter joints it matters when trying to line it up.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

12263 posts in 4347 days


#16 posted 10-29-2019 01:39 PM


Love a D handle for edge work. I ve always felt more in control of them, than those Mickey Mouse knobs so frequently used.

- therealSteveN

Yep!

The reason I love a lift so much is for making minute adjustments. A lift with a fine adjustment knob can divide an inch into 232nds. of an inch. May seem like overkill but when you are doing things like lock miter joints it matters when trying to line it up.

- Andybb


You got that right, Andy. I don’t want to think about doing a lock miter or, a few other joints, without a good adjustable lift.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View smallerstick's profile

smallerstick

31 posts in 2095 days


#17 posted 10-29-2019 02:02 PM

You might be interested in this review. I have this model, too (MR23 in NA) with both bases as replacements for aging PC 690’s. Couldn’t be happier with performance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2TjWbuGnLs

-- Peter

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#18 posted 10-29-2019 02:06 PM



You might be interested in this review. I have this model, too (MR23 in NA) with both bases as replacements for aging PC 690 s. Couldn t be happier with performance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2TjWbuGnLs

- smallerstick


I don’t think that’s sold in the US. Looks very similar to the Bosch MRC23EVSK, however.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View cmacnaughton's profile

cmacnaughton

221 posts in 562 days


#19 posted 10-29-2019 02:55 PM


You might be interested in this review. I have this model, too (MR23 in NA) with both bases as replacements for aging PC 690 s. Couldn t be happier with performance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2TjWbuGnLs

- smallerstick

I don t think that s sold in the US. Looks very similar to the Bosch MRC23EVSK, however.

- cmacnaughton


And obviously my reading comprehension leaves something to be desired this morning. Apologies.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View Robert's profile

Robert

4156 posts in 2399 days


#20 posted 10-29-2019 03:40 PM

I think 2HP would be a minimum for table use. Variable speed is really a must, especially if you plan on using larger bits like panel raisers.

All I can say is be wary of the Triton. Mine had a big backlash issue Tritons response was “its the nature of the beast”. But watching the bit drop 1/8” when you unlock it kind of puts a kink in the works.

For many years I got by with a Hitachi M12V and the Router Raizer.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2941 posts in 1522 days


#21 posted 10-29-2019 06:41 PM


I think 2HP would be a minimum for table use. Variable speed is really a must, especially if you plan on using larger bits like panel raisers.

All I can say is be wary of the Triton. Mine had a big backlash issue Tritons response was “its the nature of the beast”. But watching the bit drop 1/8” when you unlock it kind of puts a kink in the works.

For many years I got by with a Hitachi M12V and the Router Raizer.

- Robert


+1
If I’m doing panels with a big bit I’ll either switch out and put the variable speed Bosch in the table or use the HF VSC but it’s been 3 years since I did any panels which is why the PC lives in the table.

I’ve also heard that the Triton mechanism is not a replacement for a lift due to that backlash and that the Router Raizer is a good low cost option for a lift.

The heaviest thing I have cut is raised panels in oak and both the the Bosch 1617 and the PC cut them with no issues at all.

So, I’m thinking you could accomplish what you want for $200 for a used router and a Router Raizer.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View controlfreak's profile (online now)

controlfreak

1399 posts in 519 days


#22 posted 10-29-2019 07:32 PM

I am confused over “backlash” and the bit dropping when unlocked. I have this router, Titron, but building a table is still on the to do list. I am asking these questions before I make my table in case I need to go another direction. I bought this router to save money on a lift but I have made other mistakes before this one.

Backlash, can you describe a little better as to what is happening here?

Bit dropping when unlocked. Is this when you unlock the chuck or unlock the plunge adjustment lever? In either case wouldn’t you be unlocking to adjust anyway?

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2941 posts in 1522 days


#23 posted 10-29-2019 10:28 PM

I don’t own a Triton but I remember reading somewhere that this was an issue with the bit dropping slightly when the lock was released. It was addressed here on lj. And also here.. But I also remember reading somewhere else that the Titon height adjustment is not as exacting as a lift. With a lift if you raise the bit by a 32nd of an inch and it’s too high then you can drop it by exactly a 64th or even smaller. Most lifts have a dial that makes it easy to make minute adjustments.

Rich did a review on his blog about using a lock miter bit. I did one also. It’s this type of small adjustment that I am talking about. When the measurement is exact the joint disappears. Your mileage may vary. I got by without a lift for a long time but now I wouldn’t be without one.

My first lift was a Stumpy Nubs DIY lift that I used in my table saw wing that also worked better than the adjustment on my Bosch fixed base in the table when it came to making fine adjustments.

I also think that the Triton won’t fit in most lifts, however many own them and love them.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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