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View Raymer's profile

Just started running DC ductwork, any issues here?

by Raymer
posted 03-23-2019 09:01 PM


23 replies so far

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

289 posts in 585 days


#1 posted 03-23-2019 09:17 PM

From the picture it seems like you are planning that dust will go from your planer, up to the y-section and then down to the shop-vac.

If that is correct it will not work very well as the turn on the top is way to steep.
You should follow the air-stream from the source (the planer in this case) to the destination (the shop-vac).
In this you should have as few steep bend as possible so that the air and dust has a little resistens as possible.

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6496 posts in 3371 days


#2 posted 03-23-2019 09:22 PM

I wouldn’t do it that way. Like TEK73 said, that wye is really going t hamper the air flow. Better to flip it over, then another 45 to the jointer, and then down to the pick up. I also think the way the DC is hooked to the duct isn’t very effective. You want gentle turns, and oriented the correct way to have the smoothest flow possible.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 960 days


#3 posted 03-23-2019 09:35 PM

Ok thanks guys, I’ll make those corrections before going further. This is why I posted this haha I figured I would F it up, live and learn.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 960 days


#4 posted 03-23-2019 10:22 PM

Ignoring that it’s not secured to wall fully, does this look better? Should I bring the pipe to the jointer lower and have a shorter flex hose?

Also, I shortened the hose from the DC to the piping and removed the bend in it.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View tynewman's profile

tynewman

186 posts in 590 days


#5 posted 03-23-2019 10:47 PM

I would do something like this.

Slight bends, short runs, air flowing in the right direction

-- Ty

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 960 days


#6 posted 03-23-2019 10:50 PM



I would do something like this.

Slight bends, short runs, air flowing in the right direction

- tynewman

Thanks, makes sense, but I was running all the way to the ceiling to preserve that wall space. That is the only free wall available in my garage and was going to run some French cleats for a little tool organizing to be readily accessible.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View tynewman's profile

tynewman

186 posts in 590 days


#7 posted 03-23-2019 10:55 PM

I may have miss understood, I thought I saw a down pipe going down where your flex hose connects the separates and the duct work. Either way, I would wye to your jointer and go up at a 45 degree angle

-- Ty

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2057 posts in 3671 days


#8 posted 03-24-2019 12:14 AM

Scrap that T fitting, and the short radius 90. You must use Y fittings and long radius 90’s to make this work. 45 degree fittings are also ok. You need long, gradual bends for good flow.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

709 posts in 657 days


#9 posted 03-24-2019 12:26 AM

No…the Y needs to go in the direction of flow. Would be better to come off the top run then it is angling down toward your jointer. Also the 90 up top needs to be eliminated for a Y or two 45s to soften the curve.

View MikeDildayNoSpam's profile

MikeDildayNoSpam

285 posts in 1337 days


#10 posted 03-24-2019 02:05 AM

Running to the ceiling and back down is fine IMO. All of you other drops will come from the ceiling. It is typical, especially in small shops, to run in the ceiling. You don’t have to run it in the corner. You could run it a couple of feet out from the wall and 45 to the wall where you need a drop. Run it straight up over the cyclone can and then along the ceiling. For each drop use a 45 to angle to the wall then a 90 to the drop. This gives the advantage of saving the top wall space and giving you a horizontal to avoid pileups in your drops. Having a horizontal off of the main before the vertical drop is the recommended method. Having the drop go down from the main allows dust and chips to go down the drops.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6496 posts in 3371 days


#11 posted 03-24-2019 11:00 AM

You’re good going to the ceiling. You will gain some by changing the short radius wyes to the long radius type. Since those are never in stock (anywhere) a work around is to use 2-45˚ wyes with a short piece of straight pipe between them.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

289 posts in 585 days


#12 posted 03-24-2019 11:26 AM

I also think that it’s OK to go to the ceiling, I do it myself.
However, going up to the ceiling and then go down again 30cm to the left does not seem resonable to me.
You do not free any wall space, you consume it, and the suction will be lower than if you go direct.
So for equipment further away and spread around the shop, use the ceeling (or close to the floor) to save walll space.
But for the planer in the picture and the duct fan in that location, I would have gone as short as possible. Maybe a y-joint directly on the hose (if you are able to mount the blast-gate).
For the rest of the tools, I would go ceeling if there are some distance.

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View MikeDildayNoSpam's profile

MikeDildayNoSpam

285 posts in 1337 days


#13 posted 03-24-2019 11:33 AM



You re good going to the ceiling. You will gain some by changing the short radius wyes to the long radius type. Since those are never in stock (anywhere) a work around is to use 2-45˚ wyes with a short piece of straight pipe between them.

- Fred Hargis

^^^^^ Definitely long radius wyes.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View MikeDildayNoSpam's profile

MikeDildayNoSpam

285 posts in 1337 days


#14 posted 03-24-2019 11:35 AM


I would do something like this.

Slight bends, short runs, air flowing in the right direction

- tynewman

This solution gives you 180 degrees worth of bends before you even get to the ceiling. You never want to come directly from a bend into a cyclone – especially with a flexible pipe. It disrupts the smooth airflow needed for the cyclone to work properly. Not a good design. Come out of the cyclone straight to the ceiling. A sweeping 90 along the ceiling. Then for each drop a 45 wye to the wall then 90 down.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 960 days


#15 posted 03-25-2019 10:53 PM

Hey all, I really appreciate all the input and am trying to implement what you’re all suggesting, but I have to wait till this weekend to start knocking it all out.

Here is what I have so far, please tell me this is sufficient haha. I will be adding more pipe to the right to a bandsaw and also dropping to the floor and running short distance across the floor to underneath the work bench where I will Y off to both tablesaws.

Anyway, I shortened the flex hoses and went ahead and ran ductwork down low realizing at that level it won’t really be in my way, will be easier to access should I need to and will use less pipe, shorter runs and should help maximize suction, compared to longer runs all the way up to the ceiling and back down.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2057 posts in 3671 days


#16 posted 03-25-2019 11:37 PM

That looks great. My duct is run about the same height and works great. Also very accessible for the gates. I did go up over the ceiling to cross to the other side of the shop because of a door and sink. Should work good for you. Just remember the long radius 90’s. Actually, after another look, that first Y might pack with chips that don’t turn the corner. Maybe put the flex right on the pipe without the Y.

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

289 posts in 585 days


#17 posted 03-26-2019 05:51 AM

Looks very good and it sounds like you have a good plan for moving forward!
Less duchwork and easier to access for the use of space that you will not use for something else sounds like a good tradeoff.

But I agree with the previous one, there does not seem to be any use for the first Y, and the stop may pack up. So to just attach the hose directly seems like a better solution

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6496 posts in 3371 days


#18 posted 03-26-2019 10:39 AM


But I agree with the previous one, there does not seem to be any use for the first Y, and the stop may pack up. So to just attach the hose directly seems like a better solution

- TEK73

or just change it to a 45.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 960 days


#19 posted 03-26-2019 10:53 AM


Looks very good and it sounds like you have a good plan for moving forward!
Less duchwork and easier to access for the use of space that you will not use for something else sounds like a good tradeoff.

But I agree with the previous one, there does not seem to be any use for the first Y, and the stop may pack up. So to just attach the hose directly seems like a better solution

- TEK73

What would I connect that hose to if not a Y? This 4” hose only seems to connect to the blast gates or dusthood pieces like on the jointer. It won’t fit directly on the drain pipe or the 4” pvc fittings since they’re the same size.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

168 posts in 590 days


#20 posted 03-26-2019 11:57 AM

What would I connect that hose to if not a Y? This 4” hose only seems to connect to the blast gates or dusthood pieces like on the jointer. It won t fit directly on the drain pipe or the 4” pvc fittings since they re the same size.

- Raymer

Look for a 4” dust collection hose splice. Should slip into the PVC on one end, and the flex hose slips over on the other.

You can always form the PVC a bit with a heat gun or propane torch (be careful with the Mr. Torchy).

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6496 posts in 3371 days


#21 posted 03-26-2019 01:09 PM

What would I connect that hose to if not a Y? This 4” hose only seems to connect to the blast gates or dusthood pieces like on the jointer. It won t fit directly on the drain pipe or the 4” pvc fittings since they re the same size.

- Raymer

It will fit, you just have to engineer it a little. You can cut slits in the ends the PVC and squeeze it down slighly with a hose clamp to get it into the flex, or you can heat it up a little with a torch and expand it slightly. You can also heat the flex (unless it’s wire wound, some is just plastic) and stretch it some Expecting things to fit in DC ductwork is a pipe dream, so you need workarounds.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 960 days


#22 posted 03-26-2019 01:10 PM



What would I connect that hose to if not a Y? This 4” hose only seems to connect to the blast gates or dusthood pieces like on the jointer. It won t fit directly on the drain pipe or the 4” pvc fittings since they re the same size.

- Raymer

Look for a 4” dust collection hose splice. Should slip into the PVC on one end, and the flex hose slips over on the other.

You can always form the PVC a bit with a heat gun or propane torch (be careful with the Mr. Torchy).

- HackFabrication

Found it, thanks!

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View MikeDildayNoSpam's profile

MikeDildayNoSpam

285 posts in 1337 days


#23 posted 03-27-2019 11:33 AM


Looks very good and it sounds like you have a good plan for moving forward!
Less duchwork and easier to access for the use of space that you will not use for something else sounds like a good tradeoff.

But I agree with the previous one, there does not seem to be any use for the first Y, and the stop may pack up. So to just attach the hose directly seems like a better solution

- TEK73

What would I connect that hose to if not a Y? This 4” hose only seems to connect to the blast gates or dusthood pieces like on the jointer. It won t fit directly on the drain pipe or the 4” pvc fittings since they re the same size.

- Raymer

This is what I used.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/4-in-x-4-in-PVC-DWV-Mechanical-Flexible-Coupling-P1056-44/100372298

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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