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View Mcpowell's profile

Walnut Stump advice

by Mcpowell
posted 03-20-2019 03:40 PM


32 replies so far

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

404 posts in 2603 days


#1 posted 03-20-2019 03:45 PM


How long will it take this to air dry?

- Mcpowell


122 yrs

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#2 posted 03-20-2019 04:24 PM

122 yrs

- Snipes

That’s a little longer than I planned.

-- I want to be good

View Toasty's profile

Toasty

11 posts in 73 days


#3 posted 03-20-2019 04:38 PM

Wow! I am envious, and not envious. That is a lot of work. After you get it out of the ground, I would anchor seal any cut ends, and store it in the shade/barn. I have not processed a stump before, but have done it with some logs for turning. Anchor seal is amazing, if done right away, you won’s see checking for months left outside, in the round. Since I haven’t processed a stump before, I am not sure what the pith is like in a stump. I would cut out the pith, or at least get close to it to relieve some stress. Again, anchor seal at least the end grain.

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

121 posts in 70 days


#4 posted 03-20-2019 07:06 PM

...so I’ll be wenching it through some woods…

When you’re done with the wench, send her to my table, I’m getting thirsty….

Just Kidding (about the wench, not about being thirsty).

That sort of manual labor has lost it’s appeal to me many, many years ago.

Probably take a number of years to get that hunk of wood dried out to the point you can do something with it. You might hasten the drying by ‘chunking’ it out some and sealing the end grain.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View Steve's profile

Steve

1214 posts in 941 days


#5 posted 03-20-2019 07:24 PM

What kind of table are you looking to make with it?

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#6 posted 03-20-2019 07:38 PM



What kind of table are you looking to make with it?

- Steve

I am up for ideas. I figure I have a lot of time to decide, but something like a large coffee table or even some sort of table that sits at the end of a sofa, or in a hallway.

I liked these that I found on the www.

-- I want to be good

View LesB's profile

LesB

2075 posts in 3802 days


#7 posted 03-20-2019 07:43 PM

I think you will have better results if you cut it in to slabs and then let them dry. Chances are even if you pressure wash it there will be some rocks or at least pockets of soil in there that will dull your chain saw so be ready for that. If you slab it where it is located you can save the wenches back…...

Do you know what type of walnut is it?

-- Les B, Oregon

View Steve's profile

Steve

1214 posts in 941 days


#8 posted 03-20-2019 07:47 PM



I think you will have better results if you cut it in to slabs and then let them dry. Chances are even if you pressure wash it there will be some rocks or at least pockets of soil in there that will dull your chain saw so be ready for that. If you slab it where it is located you can save the wenches back…...

Do you know what type of walnut is it?

- LesB

Not knowing what type of table you wanted to build, I was going to recommend getting it slabbed up awhile too. You could also try and find someone with a kiln that would let you stick it in there.

I’d guess quite a few years for that thing to dry out in it’s current shape.

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#9 posted 03-20-2019 07:50 PM



I think you will have better results if you cut it in to slabs and then let them dry. Chances are even if you pressure wash it there will be some rocks or at least pockets of soil in there that will dull your chain saw so be ready for that. If you slab it where it is located you can save the wenches back…...

Do you know what type of walnut is it?

- LesB

Since the “wench” is me (not looking like Hack’s wench, as in bald guy with a gray beard) I’m not trying to save my back. I’ll take my time and use my come-along, and save my back hopefully. I’m feeling pretty devoted to getting it out in one piece. And if I burn through a few chain saw blades, it is expected.

I don’t know the type of walnut tree. It’s in northeast GA, and I can post a picture of the table made with the wood. Or I can take a picture of a neighboring tree that is still standing (no leaves on it at this point). Can it be identified by the bark only?

-- I want to be good

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

404 posts in 2603 days


#10 posted 03-20-2019 09:16 PM

You can build something with it right now. Just won’t be dry. I’ve built plenty of stump side tables that weren’t dry

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2239 posts in 2348 days


#11 posted 03-20-2019 09:22 PM



You can build something with it right now. Just won t be dry. I ve built plenty of stump side tables that weren t dry

- Snipes


Did you use any finish, seal ends, etc or just leave alone to dry out?

View mel52's profile

mel52

809 posts in 623 days


#12 posted 03-21-2019 03:13 AM

There is nothing you can’t move with the proper amount of explosives, and if you are lucky it might even reach the road. LOL. Good luck on getting it out, looks to be a good chunk. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

404 posts in 2603 days


#13 posted 03-21-2019 03:23 AM

Osu, on most I used pure tongue oil and tried to slow drying. Some linseed oil. Moisture will build on the bottom side, so either shim up or flip once in a while.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View tomd's profile

tomd

2203 posts in 4129 days


#14 posted 03-21-2019 04:03 AM

Build your table now and then let it dry but be ready for some movement and cracks or you might just get lucky.

-- Tom D

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#15 posted 03-24-2019 09:22 PM

Just updating y’all on the stump status….

I think I’m going to have it milled vertically, so I could possibly have the option of 2 tables. The tap root has a fork in it that you can’t see in this picture, but the other half is about the same size as what you see here. It’s a little over 4 feet wide at it’s widest point (from cut to cut).

-- I want to be good

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

288 posts in 3149 days


#16 posted 03-25-2019 12:09 AM

Yeah, slab it. Some parts will be highly figured. See this. for example.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3324 posts in 1746 days


#17 posted 03-25-2019 02:32 PM



Yeah, slab it. Some parts will be highly figured. See this. for example.

- BobAnderton

+1. Root balls often have some amazing grain that you won’t see unless you cut it lengthwise.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

404 posts in 2603 days


#18 posted 03-25-2019 02:49 PM

Holy root balls… U need an excavator

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#19 posted 04-27-2019 12:17 AM



Holy root balls… U need an excavator

- Snipes

It barely lifted the stump from the hole!

-- I want to be good

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17891 posts in 3365 days


#20 posted 04-27-2019 02:07 AM

Best. Selfie. Ever.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View Snipes's profile

Snipes

404 posts in 2603 days


#21 posted 04-27-2019 03:45 AM

Haaa

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2584 posts in 933 days


#22 posted 04-27-2019 07:55 AM


There is nothing you can t move with the proper amount of explosives,
- mel52

That line is a classic. Made me blow snot right outa my nose.

Mcpowell, the wisdom of wood driers is 1 year per 1” of thickness. BUT it has a multiplying factor to each additional inch, so the immediate answer of 122 years is pretty close. HOWEVER you could see problems associated with poor drying as soon as 6 months, some of which could queer the deal with this wood. Not to mention, coming out of the ground, when it gets warm enough your house could become a home for a lot of insect life. On the other hand a lot of folks may call that an abundance of protein.

-- Think safe, be safe

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6011 posts in 2563 days


#23 posted 04-27-2019 08:01 AM

Send the GPS coordinates and I will arrange to get it out for you.
While you sleep that is.
Lucky find!

-- Regards Rob

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4281 posts in 2126 days


#24 posted 04-27-2019 01:58 PM

I would use the come along and hoist it up from a tree branch or a tripod made with saplings and use a tarp to make a slanted roof for it. It will season and dry a lot faster in natural environment than in storage. It may not be a bad idea to rough cut it to the shape you want. 3-4 years from now, you may have a road to it.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

533 posts in 262 days


#25 posted 04-27-2019 03:27 PM

Keep the winch (come-along) handy for moving the table around the living room when you vacuum.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#26 posted 05-17-2019 02:06 AM

I had the stump cut today. 3 slabs at 2.5 inches thick, plus this one below. I hope it loses some weight over the summer while I let it dry. The below section is several hundred pounds.

-- I want to be good

View PCDub's profile

PCDub

137 posts in 603 days


#27 posted 05-17-2019 01:30 PM

Wow…

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2195 posts in 2157 days


#28 posted 05-17-2019 01:34 PM

That’s a lot of bowl blanks.
Good job I thought you were wasting your time at first.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5675 posts in 2079 days


#29 posted 05-17-2019 02:25 PM

I have one at my parents right now that needs to be dug up or ground down, I’ve thought of digging a 4’ diameter reservoir next to it and “digging” it out with my massive pressure washer allowing the muck to be pumped away from the reservoir as it accumulates. I have a chainsaw that will slab it no problem, but I have no where to store it for a year or a decade as it dries.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#30 posted 05-17-2019 02:55 PM



That’s a lot of bowl blanks.
Good job I thought you were wasting your time at first.
Good Luck

- Aj2

Bowl blanks below. I don’t have a lathe…..yet.

-- I want to be good

View Mcpowell's profile

Mcpowell

59 posts in 1248 days


#31 posted 05-17-2019 03:58 PM



I have one at my parents right now that needs to be dug up or ground down, I ve thought of digging a 4 diameter reservoir next to it and “digging” it out with my massive pressure washer allowing the muck to be pumped away from the reservoir as it accumulates. I have a chainsaw that will slab it no problem, but I have no where to store it for a year or a decade as it dries.

- bigblockyeti

Get it while you have the energy and the inclination. I’d figure out a way to store it. This one had been in the ground 5 years after being cut.

-- I want to be good

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2195 posts in 2157 days


#32 posted 05-17-2019 04:07 PM

No Lathe. In my mind that’s going to best use for all the wild grain. Live edge tables with odd shapes are horrible imitations of George Nakashima’s work.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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