LumberJocks

All Replies on Craftsman power tools

  • Advertise with us
View cjfarmer's profile

Craftsman power tools

by cjfarmer
posted 03-10-2019 12:45 AM


1 2 next »
59 replies

59 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3518 posts in 1805 days


#1 posted 03-10-2019 12:54 AM

In the last 15-20 years, the quality of the tools has gone steadily downhill. Not sure if they even make a table saw any more.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View FirehouseWoodworking's profile

FirehouseWoodworking

737 posts in 3690 days


#2 posted 03-10-2019 01:03 AM

Like you, I still have some Craftsman tools for over 40 years and they are still working great. Which is why I may not fully understand the issue.

Not because I’m a denier or anything like that. More likely because the Craftsman tools I bought 40+ years ago are much different than the ones these youngsters are buying today.

Today’s tools – Craftsman as well as other brands – are not made to the same quality and longevity as were the ones we bought so many years ago.

One just has to look at the tool itself; plastics have replaced steel; push-in electrical connectors have replaced screw posts; wrenches have lost the strength and heft because of different alloys and less of it. The list goes on and on.

Let alone the craftsmanship – pun INTENDED! – of the manufacturing and assembly. Whereas my old tools were built here in America by craftsmen – again, pun intended – who took great pride in what they did and built, today’s tools are most often made overseas by underpaid and underappreciated near-slaves who will never meet the customers who will eventually buy the products they built.

And I strongly believe that that factor of separation insulates the manufacturers from their customers and vice versa. With today’s disposable society, folks don’t buy things to last the 40+ years that we once did.

It’s an unfortunate turn of events for our society and our craft and hobby.

But I STILL love MY Craftsman tools!!

I’ll get off my soapbox now.

Cheers!

-- Dave; Lansing, Kansas

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#3 posted 03-10-2019 01:05 AM

Yea the name has taken a beating but i still use my craftsman radial arm saw my oldest brother made off with the sears best craftsman table saw now its long gone and i miss it. I got craftsman drills routers and circular saws that just keep going and a large toolbox full of craftsman hand and air tools drill bits taps and dies all still doing the job here on my farm

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View Cold_Pizza's profile

Cold_Pizza

22 posts in 169 days


#4 posted 03-10-2019 01:05 AM

They sold to Stanley black and decker a while back maybe someone else before that? everything’s been made in china for a while.

The rumor goes Home Depot scooped up their developement team for husky tools.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7404 posts in 2616 days


#5 posted 03-10-2019 01:07 AM

Craftsman (Sears) has never made tools – they put their badge on other manufacturers products and sell them as their own. The entire consumer tool industry has gone down the tubes, thanks to a myriad of financial conditions both home and abroad. The result has been forced price wars, unfortunately with quality as one of the casualties.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View sawdustjunkie's profile

sawdustjunkie

405 posts in 2134 days


#6 posted 03-10-2019 01:09 AM

The Craftsman Table Saw I had was 25 years old. A 113 model made be Emerson MFG in the US.
That saw worked perfectly the entire time I had it. The only thing I ever changed on it was the Fence and went to a linked drive belt to take out the vibration.
I had the saw for 25 years, paid $250 for it new and sold it for $250, four years ago and got a 3 H.P saw.
Last I heard, they were made in China now.

-- Steve: Franklin, WI

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1490 posts in 1911 days


#7 posted 03-10-2019 01:16 AM

It all depends on which tool you bought and how you want to use it.

Especially with regards to power tools. Example – Craftsman sold many different saws.

Many are inexpensive, small, light weight, and not very accurate; but perfect for cutting 2×4 or 2×6 for home/deck construction. The same saw stinks when you try to machine with 1/16 or better accuracy when making furniture. It is not that you can’t use it for furniture, it is the frustration and fiddling with adjustments that make it a PIA and earn the POS label.

Many of the high end saws sold by Craftsman were very nice. The line of contractor table saw and radial arm saws made by Emerson up until about 2000, were really great tools. They have a few fence/switch idiosyncrasies, but like your experience – they can be used for long time with great success. I used both a Craftsman and Ridgid made by Emersion contractor saw for over 20 years combined. They were both great contractor saws. The primary reason ‘furniture making’ folks call them POS, is that wood working equipment folks (Delta, Powermatic, etc) sold similar non-USA produced saw with biesemeyer style fence that was more repeatable and accurate.

Sears also sold a couple of 1.5-3hp hybrid cabinet saws in the last 20 years that are decent tools. These might be called a POS compared to USA made Powermatic from 60’s, or latest Sawstop; but they work really well.

In summary:
You can only believe half of what you read on internet. Deciding which half is true is the hard part.

Cheers!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#8 posted 03-10-2019 01:19 AM

If my old sears best had a weak point it was the fence but it had holes drilled so i could mount any size sacrificial fence. We used a dado set and sanding disc to do all kid of rough nasty work and it was still kicking hard when my brother ran off with it . sad part is i dont think he ever used it once. I have burned up a skill brand saw ripping cedar and have recently bought a new heavier cabinet saw and im looking for… U guessed it… A better fence

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#9 posted 03-10-2019 01:25 AM

Im a farmer which means machinist welder carpenter fabricator self medicator mechanic cook bottlewasher and thats before lunch on monday. Working as a homebuilder remodeler and sometime furniture builder i miss the days when quality was built here in the republic and guaranteed or your money back.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#10 posted 03-10-2019 01:42 AM



Craftsman (Sears) has never made tools – they put their badge on other manufacturers products and sell them as their own. The entire consumer tool industry has gone down the tubes, thanks to a myriad of financial conditions both home and abroad. The result has been forced price wars, unfortunately with quality as one of the casualties.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


Yeah the danaher tool group made a lot of craftsman they sold out or went belly up awhile back. I got a craftsman air drill that is a chicago pneumatic and a 3/4 in impact thats c p as well but i use them and dont baby anything even a tractor thats older than me and implements made 50 years ago. They aint broke down near as bad as me

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View BattleRidge's profile

BattleRidge

111 posts in 633 days


#11 posted 03-10-2019 01:52 AM

In transitioning from a homeowner / general use mode to a more focused woodworking configuration, I have recently began replacing several of my Craftsman power tools – some of which are 30 years old. With an uptick in usage, my saber saw finally died, as did my drill, but after the many years of service I received from them, I am more than completely satisfied. My circular saw is working well with the exception of the trigger that has worn and is a bit uncomfortable and the same can be said of my 1/3 sheet sander. The digital read-out on my radial arm saw no longer functions, but the saw still cuts and works fine and sees regular use. My reciprocating saw runs well, as does a detail sander and engraving tool. I have also had air compressor failure (one tankless and the other with a tank), though each were pretty old and worn. My many non-power hand tools, tool boxes and other items have been great (many of which date back to 1979) and the few items that I have broken were replaced without question, with the same to be said about Craftsman garden hand tools. Last summer my hand-me-down Craftsman / Honda push mower broke with the motor separating from the deck (I’m not sure how old it is), but I really like the mower and after a little bit of welding and adding a few small pieces of steel, it functions as good as new. I have been a well-satisfied Craftsman owner over the years and would consider the value & performance of the equipment I have had to be gratifying.

That being said, my more recent power tools have not been Craftsman. The chaos of the move from Sears and not really knowing of the present quality verses the older days has left me somewhat wavering from the brand, though with Lowe’s picking up the Craftsman line, I might at some point begin to evaluate their tools and give them another look. At the present though, my focus has been more toward each individual item that I am in need of and as such I have looked at each tool and features that I need, and branched out to a multitude of different manufacturers in finding the best tool for my purposes.

Times change and so do many things. My first car was a 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass with a Rocket 350 engine, a make and model that has been left to fade into the past.

View Mainboom's profile

Mainboom

90 posts in 175 days


#12 posted 03-10-2019 01:56 AM

craftsman went to selling a tradesman table saw which I still have one of its my back up table saw which I never use. I have the craftsman impact drivers and the drills. brad nailer 3/4 impact. and a whole slew of wrenches I bought in a kit over 20 years ago.

lowes has now taken over the craftsman brand and I have none of the newest model but the drills etc I bought about 5 years ago are not bad. personally I think its the fact its made over seas most don’t like the brand anymore. but what isn’t made overseas. Powermatic is not made in the usa. dewalt has a few things that are but not tablesaws or anything major. mostly just there drill drivers and some impacts. personally I try and buy what I can made in the usa. if I cant find someone from the usa who makes it. I buy bosch. the quality control is high and I like that.

-- CRANE OPERATORS START EARLY because iron workers need their heros ready when they wake up

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

679 posts in 3210 days


#13 posted 03-10-2019 02:00 AM

Sears never MADE anything, except money. David Bradley in Bradley IL made lawn mowers and more for Sears. Then they were taken over by Roper. Then Roper moved mowers and appliance manufacturing to southern Georgia in the 80’s. Then closed up or changed names and moved to Mexico or China. Thank you NAFTA, or as Ross called it shafta. ( shaft us ) And tarriffs won’t bring the jobs back, just raise the prices, as we have seen. I still have my Craftsman tool set, radial arm saw, and many more tools. Old but good tools.

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#14 posted 03-10-2019 02:01 AM



In transitioning from a homeowner / general use mode to a more focused woodworking configuration, I have recently began replacing several of my Craftsman power tools – some of which are 30 years old. With an uptick in usage, my saber saw finally died, as did my drill, but after the many years of service I received from them, I am more than completely satisfied. My circular saw is working well with the exception of the trigger that has worn and is a bit uncomfortable and the same can be said of my 1/3 sheet sander. The digital read-out on my radial arm saw no longer functions, but the saw still cuts and works fine and sees regular use. My reciprocating saw runs well, as does a detail sander and engraving tool. I have also had air compressor failure (one tankless and the other with a tank), though each were pretty old and worn. My many non-power hand tools, tool boxes and other items have been great (many of which date back to 1979) and the few items that I have broken were replaced without question, with the same to be said about Craftsman garden hand tools. Last summer my hand-me-down Craftsman / Honda push mower broke with the motor separating from the deck (I m not sure how old it is), but I really like the mower and after a little bit of welding and adding a few small pieces of steel, it functions as good as new. I have been a well-satisfied Craftsman owner over the years and would consider the value & performance of the equipment I have had to be gratifying.

That being said, my more recent power tools have not been Craftsman. The chaos of the move from Sears and not really knowing of the present quality verses the older days has left me somewhat wavering from the brand, though with Lowe s picking up the Craftsman line, I might at some point begin to evaluate their tools and give them another look. At the present though, my focus has been more toward each individual item that I am in need of and as such I have looked at each tool and features that I need, and branched out to a multitude of different manufacturers in finding the best tool for my purposes.

Times change and so do many things. My first car was a 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass with a Rocket 350 engine, a make and model that has been left to fade into the past.

- BattleRidge


I use air and power tools daily. I have paslode milwaukee hitachi porter cable makita and still some old craftsman i buy what will do the job and if it dont crumble i keep on using it. But literally nothing is made to last a lifetime anymore.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View MSquared's profile (online now)

MSquared

589 posts in 331 days


#15 posted 03-10-2019 02:18 AM

Well, I’m glad I starting collecting my Craftsman mechanics tools when I was a kid in the 70’s and 80’s. Rebuilt a few muscle car and sports car motors with them. Chassis, front ends, rear ends, suspensions, body parts, etc. too. They’ve Been faithful to me over the years in everything else since. I still have a few of my Dad’s that are way older. In a word, Workhorses. These days, given my budget, I’d gladly replace my reliable jobsite TS with an old C-Man 113. series when I have the room. From what I’ve read here, an older cast iron one can be tweaked to decent tolerances (fence first, obviously) for finer work.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#16 posted 03-10-2019 02:35 AM


In transitioning from a homeowner / general use mode to a more focused woodworking configuration, I have recently began replacing several of my Craftsman power tools – some of which are 30 years old. With an uptick in usage, my saber saw finally died, as did my drill, but after the many years of service I received from them, I am more than completely satisfied. My circular saw is working well with the exception of the trigger that has worn and is a bit uncomfortable and the same can be said of my 1/3 sheet sander. The digital read-out on my radial arm saw no longer functions, but the saw still cuts and works fine and sees regular use. My reciprocating saw runs well, as does a detail sander and engraving tool. I have also had air compressor failure (one tankless and the other with a tank), though each were pretty old and worn. My many non-power hand tools, tool boxes and other items have been great (many of which date back to 1979) and the few items that I have broken were replaced without question, with the same to be said about Craftsman garden hand tools. Last summer my hand-me-down Craftsman / Honda push mower broke with the motor separating from the deck (I m not sure how old it is), but I really like the mower and after a little bit of welding and adding a few small pieces of steel, it functions as good as new. I have been a well-satisfied Craftsman owner over the years and would consider the value & performance of the equipment I have had to be gratifying.

That being said, my more recent power tools have not been Craftsman. The chaos of the move from Sears and not really knowing of the present quality verses the older days has left me somewhat wavering from the brand, though with Lowe s picking up the Craftsman line, I might at some point begin to evaluate their tools and give them another look. At the present though, my focus has been more toward each individual item that I am in need of and as such I have looked at each tool and features that I need, and branched out to a multitude of different manufacturers in finding the best tool for my purposes.

Times change and so do many things. My first car was a 1971 Oldsmobile Cutlass with a Rocket 350 engine, a make and model that has been left to fade into the past.

- BattleRidge


I use air and power tools daily. I have paslode milwaukee hitachi porter cable makita and still some old craftsman i buy what will do the job and if it dont crumble i keep on using it. But literally nothing is made to last a lifetime anymore.

craftsman went to selling a tradesman table saw which I still have one of its my back up table saw which I never use. I have the craftsman impact drivers and the drills. brad nailer 3/4 impact. and a whole slew of wrenches I bought in a kit over 20 years ago.

lowes has now taken over the craftsman brand and I have none of the newest model but the drills etc I bought about 5 years ago are not bad. personally I think its the fact its made over seas most don t like the brand anymore. but what isn t made overseas. Powermatic is not made in the usa. dewalt has a few things that are but not tablesaws or anything major. mostly just there drill drivers and some impacts. personally I try and buy what I can made in the usa. if I cant find someone from the usa who makes it. I buy bosch. the quality control is high and I like that.

- Mainboom


-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

748 posts in 1393 days


#17 posted 03-10-2019 02:50 AM

The same can be said for black and decker tools. At some time they were a quality tool now there a joke. Most of the craftsman tools I bought in the last 12 years or so I have had some sort of problem with.

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#18 posted 03-10-2019 02:55 AM



The same can be said for black and decker tools. At some time they were a quality tool now there a joke. Most of the craftsman tools I bought in the last 12 years or so I have had some sort of problem with.

- corelz125


Yea sad because black and decker basically invented the hand held circular saw and now u never see their tools on a jobsite.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View MSquared's profile (online now)

MSquared

589 posts in 331 days


#19 posted 03-10-2019 03:07 AM

ibewjon; As to the politics of it all, I’d like to see someone running for office that has worked with tools in order to earn a living. I have. I know the majority of the LJ community have. It involves logical thinking, order, common sense, measuring, input and outcome analysis, investment and benefits and so much more. I’m not at all well-versed in these matters, but I think you get my drift.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

679 posts in 3210 days


#20 posted 03-10-2019 02:10 PM

M Squared. No one wants our manufacturing back more than me, but over the last 40 years, almost every manufacturing plant we did electrical projects in is gone. Chemical plants have mostly stayed, because they are tied to the pipelines that supply the raw materials. Papermills, water heaters, Cat just closed it’s last plant in northern IL, appliances, furniture, clothing, ect., and it is not because of taxes. The CEO just wants more profit for himself and stockholders, so instead if modernizing the plants, just suck out more money, then the plants are so old, just move out of the country. CEO’s mouths are watering over the cheap labor that would be available in North Korea. A race to the lowest wages available. Forget quality, it’s not part of the equation. As Ted Kennedy said, ‘When will the greed end?’. Glad to see Weather Tech expanding HERE, not overseas. End of commercial. And now back to the Craftsman tool discussion.

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#21 posted 03-10-2019 03:47 PM

All good points and yes i get the greed vs high quality point of view. Its why i still have antique coleman stoves and lanterns. They have served me well in bad situations and i wont part with em. But im trying to build high quality outdoor furniture and live edge tables for family and hopefully to sell a few pieces this summer. Im definitely not using a little jobsite saw i got a heavy cabinet saw but the fence looks like an old rockwell two rail and i dont like it. Too clunky and not micro adjustable. Does anybody have imput on vega fences? They look good and.not. too high priced.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View Murdock's profile

Murdock

134 posts in 2901 days


#22 posted 03-10-2019 04:48 PM

I can’t speak for the craftsman stuff manufactured since they were bought out but I have found their power tools hit and miss (mostly hit for me) while their wrenches, screwdrivers, etc are in my opinion great (Haven’t had a need to purchased any since they moved mfg overseas).

I am not sure what others consider to be the break point for ‘older’ craftsman tools, but I do know when I started using them in the late 90’s people were giving me grief for it.

I have a 15 year old craftsman table saw that other than a broken blade lift crank handle (movers fault) I absolutely love, I have a craftsman miter saw, that while I wouldn’t use it for fine woodworking it has served me excellently for household trim and such, I also have an aprox 20 year old circular saw that works as well as any I have had my hands on.

But then again, I have a 10 year old craftsman router that the adjustment gears broke twice in short order. Not sure why I even hold onto it as I have been using its replacement for some time now.

I am willing to pay a premium for quality US made tools, even if the one made overseas does prove to be of similar quality. However, as others have also said that is getting more and more difficult to do.

-- "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#23 posted 03-10-2019 05:01 PM

Albert was purty smart. He understood what he could not know for caertain. He said everything is possible. I dont know a bout any tool makers waking up and bringing back high quality american made tools guaranteed or your money back. I know my old old planes and stuff get more valuable by the day. I freak out at prices people want for tools i still use in my shop. I also get crazy at prices for new ones not made here. I agree its mostly shreholder greed ruining quality and service in this country. What can we do about it? Vote for people who want less government? I d k anymore.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

679 posts in 3210 days


#24 posted 03-10-2019 05:22 PM

Maybe more government. Keep the same people from sitting on multiple boards of directors. Stop the corporate buyouts. How about more taxes for overseas profits? And tax profits sitting offshore. When the people that started the companies put their own name on it, it was their personal reputation at stake. Now corporate names change so often, no one knows what company owns what. Ever think Kmart would own Sears? And most think it is the other way around.

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#25 posted 03-10-2019 05:38 PM

Albert was purty smart. He understood what he could not know for caertain. He said everything is possible. I dont know a bout any tool makers waking up and bringing back high quality american made tools guaranteed or your money back. I know my old old planes and stuff get more valuable by the day. I freak out at prices people want for tools i still use in my shop. I also get crazy at prices for new ones not made here. I agree its mostly shreholder greed ruining quality and service in this country. What can we do about it? Vote for people who want less government? I d k anymore.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#26 posted 03-10-2019 05:47 PM

More government is never a good answer. Explain how the e p a can stop me from making a low spot on my farm into a real pond? Its my land and the creek that runs thru it meanders thru some other peoples land before it empties into a lake south of me but it wont stop the creek or drain a wetland or pollute anything. I got an existing pond on the creek i could never have put in under obamas regulations. I hope some truly conservative people end this spiral of more and more regulations. They aint laws but u can get fined and prosecuted?! Really?

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#27 posted 03-10-2019 06:10 PM

I hate to say sears is doomed but it sure looks that way. The old ways are going away more quickly than ever in the history of history. Im sorry but young people think u can just order bad unhealthy food from the interweb and a drone will drop it on your lawn in 15 minutes. Stupidity is an epidemic. I tell people i farm u eat and its like they had no clue. Food comes out of the earth and honey comes from a type of wasp that will kill u happily if u mess with em. We must insist on quality and sustainability but not more government regulations. Its got to be we the people who fix this mess.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1209 posts in 1957 days


#28 posted 03-10-2019 06:14 PM

I had the Craftsman C3 line of tools and they’ve held up remarkably well over the years. 10+ years of their basic drill and the chuck grips are the first to go out recently (can’t blame it because I’ve abused it with bits not really meant for a chuck sometimes). I also their Lawn & Garden C3 tools and they performed great until the bearing started to give out and decided to upgrade to something better (cordless trimmer tech has come a decent ways in 10 years). The Briggs & Stratton US made engine on the Craftsman lawn mower is going on very strong. No end in sight for that beauty; only the push button starter was a mess after the first few years. Probably an easy fix but in reality, the pull cord has always been a one pull start, so I don’t need the push button. Now, moving to the present with Stanley Black & Decker owning the Craftsman name (to a degree), I now have their V20 US made Drill & Impact. Currently making my Miter Station with them and they are a joy to use. I saw the roadmap from Stanley laying out where the next factories will be opened to move the manufacturing back to the US. They started strong with the cordless line (yeah, I know they are mixed with China made and US made for now), so time will tell if the brand can go back to its roots.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

679 posts in 3210 days


#29 posted 03-10-2019 06:58 PM

How are the new conservative tarriffs working out for the price of soybeans? So now there are more government subsidies to farmers? That is less government? We only have food because of farmers, and most of us eat every day. Thank you.

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#30 posted 03-10-2019 06:58 PM

I hope stanley will come back to u s manufacture. I like mac tools i own some impact sockets but if they are gonna make em out of chinese steel im not paying $40 for a 3/4 drive socket i got to put 275 ft pounds of torque or more on working on my tractor. Chinese sockets and extensions are made out of cheesey stuff ive twisted off good quality extensions before its not good. Im not buying tools made in sweat shops.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#31 posted 03-10-2019 07:18 PM


How are the new conservative tarriffs working out for the price of soybeans? So now there are more government subsidies to farmers? That is less government? We only have food because of farmers, and most of us eat every day. Thank you.

- ibewjon


Tarrifs are a constitutional way for the govt to raise money. Nobody likes em but they are a weapon to use to get to free trade. Its complex diplomacy the theory is nobody gets everthing they want. Ive never asked for a subsidy u get more reguations a bigger farm bill more food stamps ya da ya da. Yea if more people realized u punish family farms u get lower quality gmo food from corporate farms. My chickens eat grasshoppers and mice which is what they should eat my crops dont get saturated in chemicals i get plenty of exposure to toxic stuff cutting hardie and sheetrock and sawing glued wood fiber products. I got enough arsenic from wolmanized wood i have trouble swallowing.its a gamble being a farmer and carpenter. I just want a reasonably level playing field.

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View RDan's profile

RDan

103 posts in 2741 days


#32 posted 03-10-2019 10:09 PM

Stanley Black & Decker, is suing Sears for Craftsman Tools being promoted as Craftsman Ultimate. The Baltimore Sun, has a article about it on March 7th, 2019 “Stanley Black & Decker sues Sears over Craftsman brand, citing social media posts.” it has this in the article “but two weeks after Sears emerged from bankruptcy Feb. 8, the reorganized retailer “launched its own new line of professional-grade mechanics’ tools under the sub-brand ‘Craftsman Ultimate Collection,’” states the lawsuit, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Manhattan.” So it continues to be an issue. My locally owned Sears store, is where I do shop if I am buying Sears goods. Dan

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#33 posted 03-10-2019 11:02 PM

Typical. Its almost as bad as john fogertys manager suing him for sounding like john fogerty. Craftsman is so synonymous with sears roebuck and company its crazy they dont have a liscening agreement with stanley and with lowes just in case sears can come back from the dead

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2988 posts in 3855 days


#34 posted 03-10-2019 11:20 PM

Of course craftsman was bought out and is sold at depot now. I’ve got a 6” jointer and bandsaw that I bought when I was 22 yrs old. I’m 64 now. I still use both regularly. I’m not sure if their tools are of good quality any longer.

I think their hand tools are still pretty good.

And my grinder story. I do a lot of metal cutting with a 4” grinder. I weld. I went through a milwaukee and a porter cable in a year each. The head were smoking at the end. I bought a craftsman thinking I’ll get the three year $7 extended warranty, no questions asked for replacement. I’ll just bring it back each year and get a new one. That was 13 years ago. It’s beat up but still grinding. Go figure.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

579 posts in 321 days


#35 posted 03-10-2019 11:21 PM

I may be older than many of you LumberJocks, so I can remember when Sears sold not only Craftsman woodworking machines but the more economical Dunlap line. I had a Dunlap table saw for years. Their mechanic’s tools were also available in the Whitworth Standard – I gave my Whitworth tools to a friend with a 1933 Rolls Royce because that’s what he needed to work on his car.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7404 posts in 2616 days


#36 posted 03-10-2019 11:29 PM

I may be older than many of you LumberJocks, so I can remember when Sears sold not only Craftsman woodworking machines but the more economical Dunlap line.
- Phil32

And they were branded as their “Companion” line before changing to Dunlap.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#37 posted 03-10-2019 11:52 PM

I remember companion tools. I saw some of them not too many years ago. They sold a sears brand of hand tools for awhile. I only bought craftsman i have some of my grandfathers tools and some of my dads even though my brothers rifled thru them and took most of them. By the way i just came in from wire brushing the post on my drill press with an old craftsman professional grinder. It was my dads i know its 25 or more years old and still works like a champ

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View ruger's profile

ruger

112 posts in 512 days


#38 posted 03-11-2019 12:31 AM

I spent 40 years in a ford dealership turning wrenches till I had all i could stand of working flat rate for warranty work
.. spent the last 30 years overhauling transmissions. have a ton of snap on mack and craftsman tools. the last 10 years the craftsman ratchets would bust the teeth out of the head on a regulator basis. impact sockets would crack like all the time. 1/2 inch flex head ratchets would break just tighting lug nuts. got to the point I wouldn’t use them on certain jobs. but even the snap on tools wouldn’t hold up like they use to. one day at 63 years old I came into work ,I had 43 fiesta vehicles with the dps6 transmissions with clutches on back order ,,,said to myself enough is enough, retired now and love life just tinkering with old wood working tools.

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#39 posted 03-11-2019 12:47 AM

I bought a bunch of inserts for my craftsman ratchets at a penny apiece at sears so when breaks i fix it . but i never used a flex head ratchet on lug nuts. I got a four way and a set of deep impact sockets for my truck and tractor lugs. Ive spun off a couple of extensions that could not take the torque of my mighty mighty snap on impact. Snap on tools are overpriced but its the only way the poor snap on drivers make a living. I got a couple thousand dollars worth of tools in each one of my rollaways and over two thirds of them are old craftsman the rest snap on mac and a matco or two. I hate to think how much ive spent on drill bits taps and dies but i warn anyone do not buy cheap taps or dies they will fail u when it matters most

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2442 days


#40 posted 03-11-2019 10:40 PM

A pal of mine was talking to a Sears rep who negotiated contracts with suppliers. His assertion was that Sears put out bids with specs, and that the specs included the cheapest components (such as bearings) to be assembled for the cheapest price. Of course this was 3rd hand, and I can’t vouch for it.

But about 30 or so years ago I bought a C man sidewinder saw, and when I fired it up at home, the bearings sounded like a handful of marbles in a can. I took it back, and the salesman said they were supposed to sound like that. That may have been the last C man I bought.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23164 posts in 3100 days


#41 posted 03-11-2019 10:46 PM

Estate Sale find Saturday….

$20…..to replace the all metal one with a broken guard…( fell off the bench, otherwise, ran great) So, a new blade, and see how it goes….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#42 posted 03-11-2019 10:54 PM

Sears is like all other retailers they try to make a buck. But i have bought and used craftman tools power hand pneumatic lawn and garden they worked like pack mules and sears stood by their warranty. Its sad they could not compete with walmart and amazon and look at all the other old school stores closing up shop. Its a new world and it sucks

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1209 posts in 1957 days


#43 posted 03-12-2019 04:44 AM



Sears is like all other retailers they try to make a buck. But i have bought and used craftman tools power hand pneumatic lawn and garden they worked like pack mules and sears stood by their warranty. Its sad they could not compete with walmart and amazon and look at all the other old school stores closing up shop. Its a new world and it sucks

- cjfarmer

I blame the CEO for never reinvesting into the stores to modernize them. They had ample opportunity to find the right talent, reinvest, and potentially succeed but they never did. The Kmart deal was the start of their grave unless they decided to REINVEST to merge the two into a new type of Walmart/Target. The potential was there to capitalize but still never did anything but let the stores get run down and make it so people Don’t want to visit their stores. It was sad to see the downfall and now I only have 1 Sears left near me where there used to be 4. I used to have several Kmarts near me and now, none in Florida. Most definitely a new world and I do hope Stanley succeeds in keeping the Craftsman name alive and actually do well.

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

140 posts in 129 days


#44 posted 03-12-2019 11:24 AM

I still like/use my Craftsman tools. Bought a lot of them in the 70’s and 80’. I have one of the most internet hated Craftsman tablesaws out there: 10” Flexdrive model. I bought that in the mid-80’s and it has seen it’s share of work. Never had the flexshaft fail. Only complaint is the machining quality. The table isn’t ‘polished’, nor are the miter slots. And one slot is ever so slightly narrower than the other. Both have rough tool marks on their edges, which make precise blade alignment a challenge. The fence was always a bugger to get aligned. I’ve recently remedied the fence issues, by installing a Vega Pro40. Along with a few other ‘upgrades’.

I have a Craftsman 6 1/8” jointer, that is a decent tool, and an old Craftsman 10” radial arm saw that I inherited from my wife’s father almost 30 years ago. The RAS needs a total re-do, which will happen hopefully before I stop breathing…

My 70’s Craftsman circular saw recently needed a switch. No longer available. My son bought me a used model that I gutted for the part. Now it’s up and running great.

I probably have the majority of the Craftsman wrenches/sockets that are available. Other than 3/4” drive stuff, I’m pretty much set and happy with their performance. Are they as good as SnapOn, Mac, Cornwell? Probably not, but they have never let me down. But I also like some of the Husky and Kobalt hand tools too.

Most of my battery powered tools are either DeWalt or Milwaukee. I have two old 9.6v DeWalt drills that are still workhorses. My DeWalt 18v hammer drill and circular saw are great. And I’m really impressed with the M12 Milwaukee drill and impact I have.

Then there’s Harbor Freight. I’m not impressed with their hand tools (wrenches/sockets). But I have one of their $29 tool kits stashed in my pickup for emergencies. I’ve bought the HF 14” bandsaw, that needed a bit of ‘tuning’. And the 16 speed drill press, that was ‘plug n play’. Both are decent tools for the money.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

140 posts in 129 days


#45 posted 03-12-2019 11:34 AM



I blame the CEO for never reinvesting into the stores to modernize them. They had ample opportunity to find the right talent, reinvest, and potentially succeed but they never did.
- Rayne

^^^ This. Eddie Lampert is true destroyer of value. Do a historical stock price query on Sears stock… He never was a retailer, and I doubt he had a clue as to the changing nature of the American consumer’s shopping habits.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

184 posts in 1649 days


#46 posted 03-12-2019 02:13 PM

Retailers like Sears, HD et.al. and manufacturers SELL what the public will purchase, if it does not sell it sits on the shelf and the company makes no $$$ and they disappear.

As Pogo says – “we have met the enemy and it is us”. People are always over simplifying issues. The chinese, mexicans etc. are perfectly capable of making world class products (e.g. Apple products and others) The real problem lies in the front offices of the manufacturers and retailers. If they spec a substandard product and then offer it to the public and we BUY it – WE are a big part of the problem as well. Front offices( CEOs CFOs etc) focus on short term gains and completely ignore the long term health and reputation of the company because they will be gone in 5 years anyway. The issue is the purchasing public put price over quality all the time and then moan about the product. You get what you pay for , it’s not any more complicated than that.

I ran a maintenance facility for 30 years. I worked for my predecessor for 5 years. He would buy POS Porter cable drills and $100.00 push mowers and have to replace them every year! When I took over I purchased Milwaukee Hole Shooter drills ( 20% more / unit) and $300.00 mowers. The drills were still working like the day I brought them in (30 years) and I got at least 5 years out of a mower. My dad was an industrial designer and he would tell me ” Buy once – cry once” and “Cheap is expensive”. I have a 1989 Volvo 240 wagon that I purchase new, it runs well to this day while my neighbors are on their 4th, 5th, 6th cars…. The Volvo was $21000.00 and they though I was crazy for paying that much for a car. I wasn’t crazy, they were short sighted….

Crap is made off shore and crap is made here. The thing that runs off a production line is dictated by QC and what the front office will accept or demands, it is really that simple. The poor line worker does what he is paid to do so it is rarely the workers fault for shoddy products it is baked into the system from above. Save a penny or two here and there and quality is always the casualty. And again, if you support the decision to make and sell crap by handing over your hard earned cash – well who is really to blame here?

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#47 posted 03-12-2019 02:20 PM

By quoting pogo possum u endear yourself to me. Pogo albert and their crew were funny. I miss them and wish more people could grasp that wisdom. We truly are our own worst enemy. God help us

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

184 posts in 1649 days


#48 posted 03-12-2019 02:43 PM

What frustrates me to hell is when I am looking for a tool or some other item and I’m willing to pay for quality but there isn’t a product made to fit the bill. As an example I was recently looking for a portable attachment for a hand drill to drill holes at a repeatable angle ( stair handrail installation). There are 4-5, $35.00 options out there and they all range from bad to worse. The next option is $1400.00 and is a dedicated stair build tool. I’m only building one stair handrail and the tool isn’t adaptable for any other use so that isn’t an option. Why are mfgs of the 4-5 other options fighting for the same sale? You would think (and I would hope) that someone would be smart enough to recognize the need for a $100.00 – $120.00 option that outperforms the competition. I have decided to modify my 30+ year old Sears ( ironic ?) drill guide to do the task. It will be a lot of work to do so but it is really my only option.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

View cjfarmer's profile

cjfarmer

80 posts in 130 days


#49 posted 03-12-2019 03:06 PM

Thats exactly what gives me a rash. The engineers may or may not have a clue what we need but if we can find it it costs more than the profit margin on the job. I had to mortise slab doors for a whole house and a jig to mortise all three hinges cost more than my labor. I ended up using a p c jig made of plastic i had to lay them out and rout them one by one. Pain in the butt. The realtor wanted it done right now but i had to do it right. Porter cable gets trashed a lot on the interweb thingy but i bought a left blade p c saw 15 years ago its cut wood metal and concrete and its still cutting now. Guys on crews ive worked with have gone thru 2 or 3 saws ripping long stuff would kill em i own 6 hand held circular saws but the p c gets most of the day in day out work. The only right blade saws i got is a craftsman and a crain supersaw for flush cuts. The crain stays in the box 9 days out of 10 but its THE saw for a really clean flush cut or shaving door bottoms to give some return air. Its one of those really cool tools i wish THEY made more of. Im no tool junkie well maybe just a little but i like a tool that lets me get the job done and hangs around for the next one

-- Who is we and where is here? - bullwinkle

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

184 posts in 1649 days


#50 posted 03-12-2019 04:58 PM

Old PC is superior to new PC and that stands true for many to most others. PC was great routers and for making unique tools like their paint stripper and others. My comment about the PC drills referred to a commercial drill but they did make a couple of better models and I’m sure that they would have out performed the model we were using. The Milwaukee Hole Shooter of a pre 1990s vintage is about as good a of a drill ever manufactured ( heavy duty and if the bit ever jammed in the work the torque could break your wrist) and that is why I went that route.

It would be nice if some decision makers read this and other threads addressing issues like these….

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

1 2 next »
59 replies


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com