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All Replies on New plug for my Pot belly jointer, 3 wire

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View Raymer's profile

New plug for my Pot belly jointer, 3 wire

by Raymer
posted 03-09-2019 08:38 PM


16 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2070 posts in 3675 days


#1 posted 03-09-2019 09:09 PM

There is no W because it is a 250 volt cord cap, not 125/250. There is no neutral. What is feeding the receptacle? Just because it is labeled 250v does not meet it is powered by 240. Check voltage at receptacle. Is the tool 120v ? Or 240?

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 964 days


#2 posted 03-09-2019 09:19 PM



There is no W because it is a 250 volt cord cap, not 125/250. There is no neutral. What is feeding the receptacle? Just because it is labeled 250v does not meet it is powered by 240. Check voltage at receptacle. Is the tool 120v ? Or 240?

- ibewjon

My garage has 2 240 outlets from when the house was built. The jointer is running on 220, here is a pic of the current plug.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 964 days


#3 posted 03-09-2019 09:19 PM

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3718 posts in 2376 days


#4 posted 03-09-2019 09:39 PM

3 wire 220/240V has no neutral. So it doesn’t matter which of the 240V wires (Black/white) goes to which pin (X/Y). The only one that matters is the ground, or green wire. It should be attached to the rounded single pin. For a locking style connector, the ground pin is typically the pin with extra hook on it.
The only time you worry about red wire is when wiring up a 4 wire circuit, as then you have neutral – which is then the white wire, and X/Y are black/red.

So to be clear, if your tool only has 3 wires, put the black/white on X/Y and green on ground.

If the tool wiring has all 4 wires, then you may need an electrician to upgrade your house outlet to 4-wire.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2070 posts in 3675 days


#5 posted 03-09-2019 09:59 PM

Most 3 wire cord is black, white, green even if used for 240 volts. As long as you are sure the tool is 240 volts, the black and white will both be hot, X and Y. Green is ground. You can mark the white wire either black or red for future reference.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 964 days


#6 posted 03-09-2019 10:04 PM



3 wire 220/240V has no neutral. So it doesn t matter which of the 240V wires (Black/white) goes to which pin (X/Y). The only one that matters is the ground, or green wire. It should be attached to the rounded single pin. For a locking style connector, the ground pin is typically the pin with extra hook on it.
The only time you worry about red wire is when wiring up a 4 wire circuit, as then you have neutral – which is then the white wire, and X/Y are black/red.

So to be clear, if your tool only has 3 wires, put the black/white on X/Y and green on ground.

If the tool wiring has all 4 wires, then you may need an electrician to upgrade your house outlet to 4-wire.

- CaptainKlutz

Thank you, the tool is my new 37-301 delta 8” jointer. It is 3 wire 220, but the plug is just the wrong type. It has this one:

However my outlet is this;

So I bought this:

My tool does only have 3 wires and I knew where ground wire goes on the new plug, just wasn’t sure where which connector took the white wire and which took the black.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

79 posts in 2435 days


#7 posted 03-09-2019 10:24 PM

I know that this response is being very blunt BUT if I had just put out real money for a new/used tool, and then was asking on the net about wiring it up correctly,, I would just start looking for a licensed electriction . Seen too many
fires that started by electrial things set up wrong.
Remember that you are not in your shop 24/7 and a fire that may start small can grow fast.

Just my opinion.
Anne who know how to replace a plug on a lamp, but who knows enough to hire the knowledgeable worker
for things I am not sure I know.

View Jeff Heath's profile

Jeff Heath

107 posts in 3951 days


#8 posted 03-09-2019 10:32 PM

As stated, since it’s wired 220V, you have two hots (white and black) and a ground(green). There is no neutral wire in your setup. You need to make sure that your new “Twist Lock” plug fits your shop receptacle. Make sure the power is off to the breaker before you test it. It doesn’t matter which way you wire the two hots, as long as they are wired to X & Y, and not to ground.

-- Jeff Heath

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 964 days


#9 posted 03-09-2019 10:53 PM

Thanks all, got it fixed, running great. I have run 110 for simple stuff, but never 240 and just wanted to be sure.

I just ran a few boards through the jointer and other than the chip knife it seems good. However, I think I am going to do some homework and figure out how to replace the bearings on the cutterhead and put in new knives.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View Raymer's profile

Raymer

92 posts in 964 days


#10 posted 03-09-2019 11:12 PM



I know that this response is being very blunt BUT if I had just put out real money for a new/used tool, and then was asking on the net about wiring it up correctly,, I would just start looking for a licensed electriction . Seen too many
fires that started by electrial things set up wrong.
Remember that you are not in your shop 24/7 and a fire that may start small can grow fast.

Just my opinion.
Anne who know how to replace a plug on a lamp, but who knows enough to hire the knowledgeable worker
for things I am not sure I know.

- anneb3

I appreciate the response and you’re right to be careful, I used an electrician to up my residential service from 150amp to 250amp and run the 240 to my garage. However, since I was just replacing a plug, didn’t figure it should require an electrician call.

With that said, if I got hit by 220, maybe it would fix the TBI I got from shrapnel in the desert. Woodworking really has helped me deal with this.

-- -Measure once, cut twice, cut once more for good measure.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

934 posts in 2466 days


#11 posted 03-09-2019 11:14 PM

FWIW, just info:
That plug that was on the machine when you bought it is the very type that works with all my 220v outlets. It is also the type that came as original equipment on my 1999 model Unisaw.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

505 posts in 2802 days


#12 posted 03-09-2019 11:39 PM

See the L that’s green, see the smaller hole make that black, see the wider hole make it white, red, blue.https://cdn.automationdirect.com/static/specs/wiringdevicesnemawiring.pdf

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2070 posts in 3675 days


#13 posted 03-10-2019 01:42 AM

Who put the plywood over the receptacle? It can not be changed without tearing down plywood. And it is a code violation to have the box recessed behind wall surface. There is a slide in box extension to fix that after the opening is enlarged. The plywood is a considered a fire hazzard when the box is not flush with the wall surface. Be safe.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2070 posts in 3675 days


#14 posted 03-10-2019 02:24 AM

Turn off power, cut out opening and remove receptacle. Tape around receptacle, insert extension into box and re install receptacle and cover. Receptacle screws hold extension into box.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2130 posts in 4180 days


#15 posted 03-10-2019 03:51 AM

I’d honestly just replace the box and mount the new old work box directly to the plywood.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2070 posts in 3675 days


#16 posted 03-10-2019 02:13 PM

The box extension is less than $2, and a lot easier than mounting a new box.

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