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View sawneck's profile

First Plane

by sawneck
posted 01-12-2019 06:36 PM


19 replies so far

View Smirak's profile

Smirak

100 posts in 1027 days


#1 posted 01-12-2019 06:40 PM

Just my two cents, but I wouldn’t consider the rabbet plane as the first purchase. From your list above, and the limited amount of information that you gave about what you’d want/need a plane for, I’d go with the LA Jack.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2794 posts in 2315 days


#2 posted 01-12-2019 06:55 PM

What do you intend to build, Tables, LA Jack. Small Boxes 102.
My first LN was the Brass 102, later got the 60 1/2 rabbet and some brass Spoke Shaves.
You can use the 102 on almost anything the LA Jack not so much?
While in principal the 60 1/2 and the Rabbet plane are the same plane after some time in your hand
you find they are slightly different and I seldom reach or look for the Rabbet plane when I need a block plane?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8770 posts in 3086 days


#3 posted 01-12-2019 07:00 PM

A LN #5 with a 50 degree frog works wonders.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2079 posts in 3808 days


#4 posted 01-12-2019 07:11 PM

I firmly believe everyone’s first plane should be a block plane. I’d get the 60 1/2.

View Johnny7's profile

Johnny7

472 posts in 1600 days


#5 posted 01-12-2019 07:33 PM

For your very first (and only) plane …

The answer is a standard (#5) jack.
There’s a reason it’s been nicknamed the “jack” plane—it’s the “Jack-of-all-Trades”

Not sure where your original list came from, but this plane should top it. It can be used for roughing, scrubbing, smoothing and, within reason, jointing.

The LA Jack, while a fine tool, is a specialized plane—one you can add to your arsenal at a later date.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3664 days


#6 posted 01-13-2019 02:31 AM



For your very first (and only) plane …

The answer is a standard (#5) jack.
There s a reason it s been nicknamed the “jack” plane—it s the “Jack-of-all-Trades”

Not sure where your original list came from, but this plane should top it. It can be used for roughing, scrubbing, smoothing and, within reason, jointing.

The LA Jack, while a fine tool, is a specialized plane—one you can add to your arsenal at a later date.

- Johnny7

Thanks..The list came mostly from my own research, some folks I respect and my own thoughts..to be honest I read Marc Spagnuolos book and he recommended skipping the 601/2 and getting the rabbett block plane because it’s two planes in one can be used as a standard block and to work tenons etc.

It’s funny you mention the standard #5, since he speaks highly of that plane too, but said for a first plane it’s takes more to set up and adjust so the LA Jack may be the better choice. Not that he is the last word but LN also recommended the LA Jack as my first plane since it’s good for flattening and many other larger plane tasks.

What about the 102 combinined with a #5? Standard or LA seems like it would be versatile for small and large workpieces/tasks.

Thanks again for your help.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3664 days


#7 posted 01-13-2019 02:33 AM



A LN #5 with a 50 degree frog works wonders.

- waho6o9

Can it flatten large boards without too much fussing ?

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3664 days


#8 posted 01-13-2019 02:39 AM



What do you intend to build, Tables, LA Jack. Small Boxes 102.
My first LN was the Brass 102, later got the 60 1/2 rabbet and some brass Spoke Shaves.
You can use the 102 on almost anything the LA Jack not so much?
While in principal the 60 1/2 and the Rabbet plane are the same plane after some time in your hand
you find they are slightly different and I seldom reach or look for the Rabbet plane when I need a block plane?

- Andre

Yes, first large project will be a slightly dumbed down Roubo..But also some small furniture, shaker table, a book case, and whatever else sparks my interest. But those are on the horizon near term. That little 102 seems like a nice plane for little every day tasks. For example I needed to flatten a small piece of maple for a shop jig would have been nice to have a plane, ANY plane actually. Instead used my belt sander for a reference edge then my planer from there.

Funny the 62 is not a highly regarded plane here on LJ, everyone else I speak to seems to think that plane is the end all be all plane.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2794 posts in 2315 days


#9 posted 01-13-2019 04:33 AM


What do you intend to build, Tables, LA Jack. Small Boxes 102.
My first LN was the Brass 102, later got the 60 1/2 rabbet and some brass Spoke Shaves.
You can use the 102 on almost anything the LA Jack not so much?
While in principal the 60 1/2 and the Rabbet plane are the same plane after some time in your hand
you find they are slightly different and I seldom reach or look for the Rabbet plane when I need a block plane?

- Andre

Yes, first large project will be a slightly dumbed down Roubo..But also some small furniture, shaker table, a book case, and whatever else sparks my interest. But those are on the horizon near term. That little 102 seems like a nice plane for little every day tasks. For example I needed to flatten a small piece of maple for a shop jig would have been nice to have a plane, ANY plane actually. Instead used my belt sander for a reference edge then my planer from there.

Funny the 62 is not a highly regarded plane here on LJ, everyone else I speak to seems to think that plane is the end all be all plane.

- sawneck

62 actually very good choice as first large plane, my preference would be a Veritas with PMV-11 iron!
All my first bench planes were Stanleys which I tuned and swapped out the irons for PMV-11
Seeing as I live quite close to a Lee Valley the Veritas planes were much easier and cheaper to obtain, PMV-11 irons made the choice a no brainer.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1891 posts in 2003 days


#10 posted 01-13-2019 07:03 AM

Another hand plane debate about personal choice, so much as been posted already:

http://lumberjocks.com/search_results?q=first+plane

This blog has a good summary on picking first plane:
http://lumberjocks.com/OSU55/blog/39841

and then your second one:
http://lumberjocks.com/OSU55/blog/39842

Remember that as soon as you get one hand plane and have experience;
you will develop a personalized purchase priority list, regardless of what you read on WWW. :-0)

Good luck on your decision!

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1426 posts in 1619 days


#11 posted 01-13-2019 10:44 AM

Do yourself a favour and get a low angle smoothing plane from Lee Valley.
Low angle why?? We use chisels bevel up, why wouldn’t we use hand plane blades bevel up?
Just my 2 cents worth.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?c=&p=45864&cat=1
Regards Anthony

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8770 posts in 3086 days


#12 posted 01-13-2019 12:26 PM

Can it flatten large boards without too much fussing ?

Yes.

I flattened the workbench my plane’s sitting on without tear out and it turned out great.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3664 days


#13 posted 01-13-2019 12:34 PM



Do yourself a favour and get a low angle smoothing plane from Lee Valley.
Low angle why?? We use chisels bevel up, why wouldn t we use hand plane blades bevel up?
Just my 2 cents worth.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?c=&p=45864&cat=1
Regards Anthony

- anthm27

so why not a low angle jack instead?

View knockknock's profile

knockknock

473 posts in 2682 days


#14 posted 01-13-2019 12:55 PM


Do yourself a favour and get a low angle smoothing plane from Lee Valley.
Low angle why?? We use chisels bevel up, why wouldn t we use hand plane blades bevel up?
Just my 2 cents worth.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?c=&p=45864&cat=1
Regards Anthony

- anthm27


Interesting concept, I started with a LV/Veritas small bevel up smoother
Because it could do the same functions as a block plane (although one hand usage is clumsy and not realistic), and be used as a smoother for the faces of boards, flushing dovetails, and shooting. If you are only ever going to get one plane, the small bevel up smoother makes a nice gentleman’s plane. Or in the longer run it is a nice small and light bevel up bench plane.

-- 👀 --

View Don W's profile

Don W

19331 posts in 3077 days


#15 posted 01-13-2019 01:43 PM

We all do things differently, build different things and work in different ways.

Personally I can’t see a jack as a first plane and definitely not a rabbet. For a first bench plane a #4. A good block plane is a must.

https://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/26/what-bench-planes-do-i-need/

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3664 days


#16 posted 01-13-2019 11:40 PM



Do yourself a favour and get a low angle smoothing plane from Lee Valley.
Low angle why?? We use chisels bevel up, why wouldn t we use hand plane blades bevel up?
Just my 2 cents worth.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?c=&p=45864&cat=1
Regards Anthony

- anthm27

Im liking this suggestion the more and more i learn about this plane…Seems like a nice jumping in point..This and the 102 would be versatile. I think from there the project will dictate my plane, I suspect something for jointing, but I will ask more questions when I get to that point.

What types of tasks have you had success with the 164? i’d want to be able to smooth, chamfer, maybe flatten as well. Any tasks like that?

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1426 posts in 1619 days


#17 posted 01-13-2019 11:54 PM

so why not a low angle jack instead?

- sawneck

Jack will be very heavy, you will do with a smoothing plane what a jack can do but not vice versa.

But hay yes, if you’ve got the money buy the smoothing plane and the Jack, (and a block pane) then your set.

Regards
Anthm

EDIT: By the way I,d buy all three low angle bevel up.

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3664 days


#18 posted 01-14-2019 12:08 AM


so why not a low angle jack instead?

- sawneck

Jack will be very heavy, you will do with a smoothing plane what a jack can do but not vice versa.

But hay yes, if you ve got the money buy the smoothing plane and the Jack, (and a block pane) then your set.

Regards
Anthm

EDIT: By the way I,d buy all three low angle bevel up.

- anthm27

thanks..Yeah I think I will start with a smaller block and that smoothing plane you recommended once i put a little more research into it. The LN version of the smoothing plane looks like a gem.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1426 posts in 1619 days


#19 posted 01-14-2019 12:24 AM


thanks..Yeah I think I will start with a smaller block and that smoothing plane you recommended once i put a little more research into it. The LN version of the smoothing plane looks like a gem.

- sawneck

Your right , The LN low angles are absolute Gems,

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

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