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Hello and Table Saw question

by BigChip
posted 12-28-2018 02:13 AM


42 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

1460 posts in 3362 days


#1 posted 12-28-2018 02:36 AM

I think your friend needs to go to Tool Jail…. SMDH that’s the ugliest thing I’ve ever seen. My neighbor has that saw, I don’t think it was a painted surface, but perhaps it was some sort of powder coat that failed. I can’t find a spec for what the top surface metal is, but I “think” it’s aluminum or a similar alloy. As the top is already FUBAR, if I were in your shoes, (and didn’t pay more than $50 for it), I’d start with some 100 grit in a ROS and see if it cleans up. Other schools of thought might be to try a razor scraper first then go to sand paper. If you get zero results from those than a flap wheel or wire brush might work, but I would be fearful of being too aggressive as I’m certain the top is NOT cast iron. Once you do get it cleaned up paste wax should be sufficient to protect and keep it smooth. Good luck with it and Welcome to the forum.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#2 posted 12-28-2018 02:50 AM


I think your friend needs to go to Tool Jail…. SMDH that s the ugliest thing I ve ever seen.
- ChefHDAN

Um no, The BEFORE pic would have the be the ugliest thing you’ve ever seen..

But like I said, it’s a budget thing and the truth is I am thrilled to have a table saw. So, I’ll deal with it.

Truth is, the top looks bad, but the rest of it cleaned up pretty good, and seems to work fine.

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TravisH

685 posts in 2448 days


#3 posted 12-28-2018 02:57 AM

I have had really good results with Motsenbocker’s Lift Off. Very easy to use. My local Ace Hardware carries it.

https://www.liftoffinc.com/products/product/MLO41132QTX0/motsenbocker-s-lift-off/cp_/all-products/professional

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woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2922 days


#4 posted 12-28-2018 03:16 AM

What is top made of?

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#5 posted 12-28-2018 03:40 AM

Since you said he wanted to sell it cheap I assume that means you paid money for that piece of crap. Bad move. Honestly, if someone offered that to me for free I’d say no thanks.

I know you want a table saw but that’s not even remotely functional, and it’s not a level of machine that is worth refurbishing. Sorry, but I’d ask if he would be willing to take it back. No refund, just take it off your hands. Not only did you pay for junk, but you’ll probably have to pay again to take it to the dump.

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#6 posted 12-28-2018 03:53 AM



Since you said he wanted to sell it cheap I assume that means you paid money for that piece of crap. Bad move. Honestly, if someone offered that to me for free I d say no thanks.

I know you want a table saw but that s not even remotely functional, and it s not a level of machine that is worth refurbishing. Sorry, but I d ask if he would be willing to take it back. No refund, just take it off your hands. Not only did you pay for junk, but you ll probably have to pay again to take it to the dump.

- Rich

Thanks – big help!

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 972 days


#7 posted 12-28-2018 04:03 AM



Since you said he wanted to sell it cheap I assume that means you paid money for that piece of crap. Bad move. Honestly, if someone offered that to me for free I d say no thanks.

I know you want a table saw but that s not even remotely functional, and it s not a level of machine that is worth refurbishing. Sorry, but I d ask if he would be willing to take it back. No refund, just take it off your hands. Not only did you pay for junk, but you ll probably have to pay again to take it to the dump.

- Rich

Why do you have to burst his bubble. Hmmm.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#8 posted 12-28-2018 04:05 AM


What is top made of?

- woodbutcherbynight

Aluminum.

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 972 days


#9 posted 12-28-2018 04:06 AM

I would get a paint remover that is safe on the aluminum. After removing the paint then take some 400 or higher sandpaper on a flat block and sand the surface. Then either paint it or use Johnson’s paste wax to protect it.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#10 posted 12-28-2018 04:10 AM



I would first get a magnet to determine whether it is steel/cast iron or aluminum. Then I would get a paint remover that is safe on the metal. After removing the paint then take some 400 or higher sandpaper on a flat block and sand the surface. Then either paint it or use Johnson s paste wax to protect it.

- MikeDilday

Yep, it’s aluminum. That sounds like a good plan. Will give it a whirl. Thanks!

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 972 days


#11 posted 12-28-2018 04:10 AM


Since you said he wanted to sell it cheap I assume that means you paid money for that piece of crap. Bad move. Honestly, if someone offered that to me for free I d say no thanks.

I know you want a table saw but that s not even remotely functional, and it s not a level of machine that is worth refurbishing. Sorry, but I d ask if he would be willing to take it back. No refund, just take it off your hands. Not only did you pay for junk, but you ll probably have to pay again to take it to the dump.

- Rich

Why do you have to burst his bubble. Hmmm.

- MikeDilday


-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 972 days


#12 posted 12-28-2018 04:12 AM

BigChip don’t listen to the bullies – some people are just mean. Keep building your woodshed and don’t let people discourage you. With a little elbow grease that saw will be good as new. I build a lot of nice stuff using an old Craftsman table saw with a cheap fence and miter. Later if you stay with it you can upgrade the saw if you want.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#13 posted 12-28-2018 04:22 AM

No big deal. I’ll polish up that turd and get a lot of use out of it I am sure! Bringing it back to life is half of the fun, especially if someone else says it’s crap. It is a lot better than having NO table saw.

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MSquared

726 posts in 427 days


#14 posted 12-28-2018 04:25 AM

Nice, Rich! ... And you started out with what? BigChip, Mike has sage advice. Rich’s is malignant.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

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Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#15 posted 12-28-2018 04:25 AM


BigChip don t listen to the bullies – some people are just mean. Keep building your woodshed and don t let people discourage you. With a little elbow grease that saw will be good as new. I build a lot of nice stuff using an old Craftsman table saw with a cheap fence and miter. Later if you stay with it you can upgrade the saw if you want.

- MikeDilday

That saw will never be as good as new. In fact, it will likely never be solid enough to use safely. You’re encouraging the OP to risk his life and limb over some strange whim you have that elbow grease is going to make that piece of crap like new.

Call me names all you want (which says a lot about your character — or lack thereof), I’m simply telling him the truth.

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ChefHDAN

1460 posts in 3362 days


#16 posted 12-28-2018 04:39 AM

Daddy always said, “A poor carpenter blames his tools!”

Chip, if the price was right for you and you can get into a better working condition, then agreed, it’s better than not having any TS at all, but if you can sell it for more than you paid and move onto a better contractor saw, then you’ll really be ahead.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 972 days


#17 posted 12-28-2018 04:41 AM

Ok to make Rich happy the standard disclaimer – BE CAREFUL – its a saw.

I have an old ‘70s band saw that is underpowered and nowhere near as nice as the new stuff out there today but it is one of the tools I am very fond of. My son-in-law has my old Craftsman table saw that I hated to give up but it just wasn’t up to the task any more. Just adopt some good safety practices and don’t get distracted when using power tools.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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Charlie H.

388 posts in 1163 days


#18 posted 12-28-2018 04:47 AM

What did you pay for the saw ?

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

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Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#19 posted 12-28-2018 04:49 AM

I call them as I see them. If you want to see someone man up, head over to the Help??? thread where, even though he took the low road and called me names here, I gave a big thumbs up to MikeDilday’s suggestion for a fix for that poster’s error. If he’s right — and he was — I’m man enough to give Mike credit for a great idea regardless of his snotty comments to me here.

And MSquared — I started out with ten fingers and I intend to keep them. Using a POS table saw is a good way to lose a few. Now, head on out to the shop and build something to post for us.

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MrUnix

7482 posts in 2712 days


#20 posted 12-28-2018 05:41 AM

There is absolutely nothing wrong with that saw as long as you use it within its limits and for its intended purpose. Finish cleaning up the top and give it a good waxing. After that, clean the internal lift/tilt mechanisms and lube with paraffin wax or a good dry lube. Throw a good general purpose thin kerf blade on there and you can have a saw that functions like new for just a little bit of work.

As for use – keep in mind that it is a portable jobsite saw. It wasn’t designed to do high precision joinery work, or long production hours ripping hardwoods. It has a direct drive universal motor with a plastic housing that can easily be damaged if pushed too hard. The rear of the hosing is what holds the rotor and rear bearing, and too much heat will quickly warp and toast the motor (which costs more to replace than a new saw sells for!). If you take it easy, don’t push it too hard and let it rest between uses to keep cool, it will work just fine for 99% of what a weekend warrior may want to do. I’d also suggest making some push shoes and a miter sled as your first projects… the miter gauge on those things are worse than useless.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#21 posted 12-28-2018 05:49 AM

Based on my friend’s (completely inaccurate) description of this saw I gave him $60 before I even saw it. When I saw the condition of it my heart dropped a little, but I figured it was mostly dirt, plus I had already made the deal with him. Shame on me.

All that aside, it works, it has been cleaned up and will be polished up more. And yes, I know, table saw = danger.

One day maybe a higher quality TS will work its’ way into my shop. Until that day, this one stays. My budget is very limited, and I will take what I can get and make it work for me. (You should see some of my other crappy tools! HA HA)

Hearing someone knock my purchase is just part of being on the internet. Ask the internet for a recommendation on where to get a good hamburger, and folks will tell you how you’re better off eating a salad…

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Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#22 posted 12-28-2018 06:22 AM


There is absolutely nothing wrong with that saw as long as you use it within its limits and for its intended purpose.

- MrUnix

How can you make that assumption based on a photo of a very badly corroded machine? Have you looked into the interior? What’s the runout on the arbor? Where is the fence? How badly has that corrosion affected the motor. Are the mounts corroded? Will that motor fly loose in the middle of a cut and do God knows what to things around it?

To the OP: I’m not a tool snob. My shop consists of very modest tools. But as a retired engineer I have an understanding of what weaknesses can affect a machine, and when that machine has a sharp blade spinning at 3400 RPM, it’s something to be concerned about. I wish you the best with it.

Sadly, this turned into an ugly thread. I gather that I’m supposed to speak softly to a bunch of snowflakes rather than tell it like I see it, which is what I did. As for it just being part of being on the Internet, I’ve been on the Internet since the mid ‘80s (I was at Hughes Aircraft Co, one of the original contractors for the DARPA effort), so if you want to learn something about it and its evolution and the evolution of civility on it, just ask me.

Best wishes for a Happy New Year to you all.

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AlaskaGuy

5355 posts in 2822 days


#23 posted 12-28-2018 06:55 AM

All I can say is it’s a good thing rantingrich isn’t here doing his review.

And political correctness isn’t always the best answer.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#24 posted 12-28-2018 07:10 AM


All I can say is it s a good thing rantingrich isn t here doing his review.

- AlaskaGuy

He was far more level-headed than many in this thread.

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ChefHDAN

1460 posts in 3362 days


#25 posted 12-28-2018 12:24 PM

Rich you raise a fair point, and I’ll never be confused with a snowflake.

Chip my input is solely based on the assumption that the issues with your saw are cosmetic issues. You said earlier in this thread that it seems to work fine. Bearing Unix’s comments about the nature of a direct drive motor, please do examine the motor mounts and other mechanicals under the top to be sure there’s nothing sketchy there.

Welcome again to LJ’s and while I often prefer a great salad over a burger, both can achieve greatness with a mixture of diverse ingredients!

Joy to the World, Peace on Earth as well as here on LJ, Happy new year y’all

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 972 days


#26 posted 12-28-2018 01:31 PM

And now, back to the OP original question after a brief intermission.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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knotscott

8339 posts in 3888 days


#27 posted 12-28-2018 01:33 PM

That’s worth more than $60 in parts. Cosmetically it’s pretty rough, but as portable jobsite saws go the Ridgid is a good one. I think it’s worth investigating to see if the mechanisms all function safely. Clean it up, lube the gears, and see how it works. If it works well enough, get a decent blade for it (starting at ~ $30), get everything aligned, and use it.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#28 posted 12-28-2018 09:05 PM

Not too bad after sanding/waxing the top and a bit more cleaning…

Its smooth now, and the blade has been squared. Test cuts went well, but the blade I put on it is very old, so I will order a new one ASAP.

Everything lubed and moves smoothly.

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Mike_in_STL

996 posts in 1047 days


#29 posted 12-28-2018 09:34 PM

I think you did a fine job. That saw certainly has a better fence than mine, significantly more table space, a bigger switch, and markedly better dust collection than my old turd of a Delta. Hell, at least you can make a zero clearance insert for yours.

You make due with what you have, and if you like what you are doing, as time goes by, invest in something better. It’s amazing what you can do when determination and self worth has more value than a dollar. Get a decent carbide blade and start making sawdust.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

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MikeDilday

259 posts in 972 days


#30 posted 12-28-2018 10:24 PM

Oh WOW. That saw looks great BigChip. Nice work.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

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Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#31 posted 12-28-2018 10:32 PM

I stand corrected. You certainly made a silk purse out of a sow’s ear. Nice work.

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cracknpop

353 posts in 2862 days


#32 posted 12-28-2018 10:51 PM

Nice job BigChip. You will get more than your $60 worth out of using that saw. Get that new blade installed. Double check that it squared up and the fence is aligned. Then start producing some sawdust… perhaps your first project should be a sled.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

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marvinlee

37 posts in 2702 days


#33 posted 12-28-2018 10:56 PM



BigChip don t listen to the bullies – some people are just mean. Keep building your woodshed and don t let people discourage you. With a little elbow grease that saw will be good as new. I build a lot of nice stuff using an old Craftsman table saw with a cheap fence and miter. Later if you stay with it you can upgrade the saw if you want.

- MikeDilday


-- Marvin, Kiger Island

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marvinlee

37 posts in 2702 days


#34 posted 12-28-2018 10:59 PM

My first table saw was an ancient eight inch Sears saw with no fence. You have done far better with your saw choice and it has the potential to do fine work. My Ridgid served me well for many years.

-- Marvin, Kiger Island

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#35 posted 12-28-2018 11:44 PM

Thanks everyone, thanks to you too Rich. I appreciate it.

First project will definitely be a sled! Seems like the best way to make that saw very usable.

However, the project before any of that will be opening that box on the floor behind that Table saw. It holds my new Grizzly G0555 Bandsaw! I did the tablesaw first because I need to cut out a platform for the Bandsaw. It will get a set of casters.

All of this stuff has to live in a carport. My “shop” is only a shop when the cars get moved out of the way. I will need to find a good cover for the grizzly too. I managed to find an Air Conditioner cover that fits over my Radial Arm saw, which works well keeping it clean and free of cat piss… :-(

MY favorite kind of projects are taking old stuff, and not necessarily “restoring” them, but refurbishing them for everyday use. And most of my projects are done with a limited budget, which make them more fun. To give you an idea, here’s a BEFORE/AFTER of a 1979 Chevy truck I bought about 4 years ago. Over time I have redone/rebuilt almost everything on this truck. Some things were done by friends because I wasn’t skilled enough. The last thing I did was to recently paint it. This is done in John Deere Blitz Black tractor paint and Rustoleum Red out of a can. Sprayed right in my dirt driveway. I love this old truck!

I am definitely NOT the level craftsman that many here are, so I hope to learn from you. And I hope to raise the level of my skill by doing so.

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mel52

1040 posts in 777 days


#36 posted 12-29-2018 01:53 AM

Looks good to me. My first table saw was an old craftsman with a bolted on 2×4 as a fourth leg. Looked like crap but did a decent job. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View MSquared's profile

MSquared

726 posts in 427 days


#37 posted 12-29-2018 02:54 AM

Chip, Your elbow grease seems to have paid off.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

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woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2922 days


#38 posted 12-29-2018 03:08 AM

Nice work. Some lessons learned here. Look before you leap, elbow grease will pay off, in doing the refurb work you got familiar with your saw. The advice you got ranged from one end of the spectrum to the other. Everybody didn’t give you high fives, but many offered some good advice pro or con and encouraged you.

We all started somewhere, you did not learn to run before you learned to walk.

Lastly, work with what you have, not what you wish for.

Look forward to eeing your first project.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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MSquared

726 posts in 427 days


#39 posted 12-29-2018 03:26 AM

Well put. That pretty much sums it up.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

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MSquared

726 posts in 427 days


#40 posted 01-02-2019 03:03 AM

Hey Big Chip! Happy New Year … How’s the saw working out?

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

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BigChip

10 posts in 298 days


#41 posted 01-11-2019 04:57 PM



Hey Big Chip! Happy New Year … How s the saw working out?

- MSquared

I’ve had other projects in the meantime so I haven’t had time to use it, but I did order and receive a new blade and will install it and try it out this weekend possibly. Same with my New bandsaw – it’s been sitting there crying for me to use it.

Maybe I can build a cross cut sled this weekend.

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JCamp

1004 posts in 1063 days


#42 posted 01-11-2019 07:21 PM

Ur saw looks good BigChip. It’ll last you plenty long enough to have fun with it. Tinker around with it and make it yours. If u ever wanna upgrade you’ll likely get more out of it now that it’s cleaned up and all your homemade jigs for it. Till then just use the snot out of it

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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