LumberJocks

All Replies on Epoxy fill vs Torch on CNCed lettering

  • Advertise with us
View avsmusic1's profile (online now)

Epoxy fill vs Torch on CNCed lettering

by avsmusic1
posted 12-20-2018 12:59 AM


14 replies so far

View avsmusic1's profile (online now)

avsmusic1

397 posts in 1046 days


#1 posted 12-20-2018 11:45 AM

After thinking about it more last night I’m leaning towards torch w/ sacrificial lacquer coat on the flat surface around the text.

Anyone have any experience doing this?

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1308 posts in 2313 days


#2 posted 12-20-2018 01:34 PM

I have zero experience with either method. I do have experience with screwing stuff up, and I can speak with authority. You really need to try out either or both methods on a similar piece of scrap before having a go at your beautiful burl. If you have a small off cut from the piece perhaps your CNC shop would quickly put a few scrawls on it so you have a test piece to work with.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1797 posts in 524 days


#3 posted 12-20-2018 03:08 PM

how are your hand painting skills ?
with a small project like that, you could finish sanding
and apply your clear coat, then hand paint the engraved
graphics with small brushes with very little bleeding of the black paint.
[filling any of the selected voids with epoxy is a separate project].

as for the torch idea, you can engrave some similar graphics on similar wood
with the hand-held router (no need for the CNC for a test panel).
with the torch, the top edges will burn, some of the bottom of the graphics
will brown, the deep corners and recesses will not be affected very much (if at all).
so in essence, you will not be satisfied with the burning technique.
~ I vote for hand painting ~

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1260 days


#4 posted 12-20-2018 03:13 PM

Fill with the epoxy, don’t burn.

View avsmusic1's profile (online now)

avsmusic1

397 posts in 1046 days


#5 posted 12-20-2018 03:46 PM



how are your hand painting skills ?
with a small project like that, you could finish sanding
and apply your clear coat, then hand paint the engraved
graphics with small brushes with very little bleeding of the black paint.
[filling any of the selected voids with epoxy is a separate project].

as for the torch idea, you can engrave some similar graphics on similar wood
with the hand-held router (no need for the CNC for a test panel).
with the torch, the top edges will burn, some of the bottom of the graphics
will brown, the deep corners and recesses will not be affected very much (if at all).
so in essence, you will not be satisfied with the burning technique.
~ I vote for hand painting ~

.

.

- John Smith


I had debated hand painting actually but i’m not terribly skilled at it and it seemed like the paint might run just like epoxy into some of the nooks the smaller lettering intersects with. That said, the paint would be plenty easy to sand off if I made a mess so skill probably isn’t too important.

As a note to others, I have plenty of scrap cherry that I can do a test run on but none of it is burl wood and there are no viable cutoffs from this.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

495 posts in 2931 days


#6 posted 12-20-2018 03:50 PM

Just my opinion, but I think the burned finish is more of a rustic look, where epoxy fill looks more modern. I think it comes down to what look you’re trying to achieve.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7475 posts in 3729 days


#7 posted 12-20-2018 06:15 PM

I agree with jerkylips, depends on what look you want to achieve!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

5026 posts in 1345 days


#8 posted 12-20-2018 06:25 PM



how are your hand painting skills ?
with a small project like that, you could finish sanding
and apply your clear coat, then hand paint the engraved
graphics with small brushes with very little bleeding of the black paint.
[filling any of the selected voids with epoxy is a separate project].

as for the torch idea, you can engrave some similar graphics on similar wood
with the hand-held router (no need for the CNC for a test panel).
with the torch, the top edges will burn, some of the bottom of the graphics
will brown, the deep corners and recesses will not be affected very much (if at all).
so in essence, you will not be satisfied with the burning technique.
~ I vote for hand painting ~

.

.

- John Smith


+1

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View avsmusic1's profile (online now)

avsmusic1

397 posts in 1046 days


#9 posted 12-20-2018 06:40 PM


Just my opinion, but I think the burned finish is more of a rustic look, where epoxy fill looks more modern. I think it comes down to what look you re trying to achieve.

- jerkylips


I agree with jerkylips, depends on what look you want to achieve!

- oldnovice


Agree as well

I’m open to either aesthetic so I’m really trying to figure out which is more viable given the proposed approaches and the challenges of the specific piece (nooks/crannies). Sounds like the burn method is the only one that we don’t have specific “votes” for though. Has anyone hear used a burning method with sacrificial lacquer? Will it even work as I’m envisioning it will?

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1797 posts in 524 days


#10 posted 12-20-2018 07:53 PM

I can’t speak for the other members, but, when I hear “propane torch”
I think of the big bottle torch like the plumbers use (MAPP gas) with
a very intense flame.
I have a small pencil flame butane micro-torch that I have never used.
if you really want to try the burn thing, you can pick up the “butane” micro torch
at Harbor Freight for cheap and see if that will work for you.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View ocean's profile

ocean

158 posts in 1194 days


#11 posted 12-20-2018 08:23 PM

I agree with John. Sand the top and finish with your lacquer and then hand paint the lettering. Keep a rag at hand to wipe away an any paint that strays outside the grooves. Finish (lacquer) should prevent any paint staining on surface.
Black epoxy sounds great but I for one would have difficult time pouring it in the narrow grooves of the lettering. As someone said practice on another piece first.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View avsmusic1's profile (online now)

avsmusic1

397 posts in 1046 days


#12 posted 12-26-2018 03:25 AM

So long as you get the first finish coat on before midnight on Christmas it still counts, right?

Thanks for the help all – went w/ epoxy
Merry Christmas!

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

618 posts in 1002 days


#13 posted 12-26-2018 11:20 AM

Great job!
Have done a few like this, but no burls, and have always used paint. Typically a sacrificial coat of shellac first making spillage easier to clean off.
You did a great job with epoxy.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View OG51's profile

OG51

150 posts in 472 days


#14 posted 12-26-2018 05:13 PM

That is beautiful. Wonderful job on the project.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com