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View trsnider's profile

basic planing techniques

by trsnider
posted 12-18-2018 04:51 PM


21 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9480 posts in 1523 days


#1 posted 12-18-2018 05:04 PM

What kind of wood are you planing? Low angle planes excel at some things but smoothing gnarly, figured or direction-changing grain isn’t one of them. If the grain isn’t pretty straight and clear, you’d probably have better luck with a standard pitched smoother or, even better, a high-angled smoother.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View trsnider's profile

trsnider

128 posts in 2395 days


#2 posted 12-18-2018 05:33 PM

Both oak and walnut nothing real gnarly about either. I’ll try and replicate my results and post some pics later.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4473 posts in 974 days


#3 posted 12-18-2018 05:50 PM

Kenny’s right about the grain. However, the beauty of a low-angle plane like yours is that the blade is mounted bevel-up, so by sharpening it at higher angles you can affect its performance in wavy wood. Some users keep multiple blades sharpened at different angles and switch them out depending on the situation. You can even grind a blade blunt and then you’ll have a scraper plane.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1900 posts in 2568 days


#4 posted 12-18-2018 05:55 PM

If it’s skipping, you’re either taking too heavy of a cut, the blade isn’t sharp, or both.

Wax the sole, retract the blade all the way, and slowly turn the knob until you’re just getting shavings. If you’re getting dust, sharpen the blade. If you’re getting a shaving on only one side of the plane, adjust the lateral lever to square the blade.

For a smoother, relieving the corners of the blade is common to avoid gouges on the sides.

A dull Lie Nielsen cuts just as crappy as a dull stamped frog Home Depot POS. Learn to sharpen & setup your plane, and touch up often.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Andre's profile

Andre

2610 posts in 2191 days


#5 posted 12-18-2018 06:58 PM

Get a Veritas with PMV-11 irons and not have to worry about sharpening:) Grain direction can be tricky, try attacking from different angles? I have had better luck smoothing with a high angle (55 deg) but then again it was a Veritas with the PMV-11 Iron:)

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2751 posts in 3268 days


#6 posted 12-18-2018 07:15 PM

Learning to plane is a skill that has to be learnt. I went through the same process when I started using hand planes. I got a lot of excellent advice from this site, but still struggled. What helped me the most was getting a few books on handplaning eg. The Handplane Book by Garrett Hack and/or The Essential Woodworker by Wearing.
Step 1 is to have a razor sharp blade, literally, if you can’t shave with the blade, it isn’t sharp enough.
Step 2 is learning how to set up the plane and tune it; even the “fancy” planes I have from LV and LN have needed a bit of tweaking before they were ready to work.
Step 3 is learning how to set the blade, the mouth etc.

As a beginner, if the blade is skipping etc. it is probably not the grain direction but sharpness and how you have the plane set up.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5205 posts in 4345 days


#7 posted 12-18-2018 07:26 PM

Take THIN shavings. All too many times the WWer will try to take very thick cuts. Leads to crappy results.

That said, proper set up, sharp-REALLY SHARP irons are a must.

Thick cuts are for scrub planes.

-- [email protected]

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2296 posts in 2374 days


#8 posted 12-18-2018 07:45 PM



If it s skipping, you re either taking too heavy of a cut, the blade isn t sharp, or both.

Wax the sole, retract the blade all the way, and slowly turn the knob until you re just getting shavings. If you re getting dust, sharpen the blade. If you re getting a shaving on only one side of the plane, adjust the lateral lever to square the blade.

For a smoother, relieving the corners of the blade is common to avoid gouges on the sides.

A dull Lie Nielsen cuts just as crappy as a dull stamped frog Home Depot POS. Learn to sharpen & setup your plane, and touch up often.

- shampeon

+1 ….. dont need a book, just simple advice like this. Figure out how to get whispy, centered shavings, and the heavier cuts will be easy. For smoother irons some strokes with down pressure on each side of the iron while sharpening usually provides enough corner relief to prevent tracks.

View Max™'s profile

Max™

88 posts in 294 days


#9 posted 12-25-2018 12:43 AM

Slide it across with no pressure, see how it does, if it doesn’t pull up anything, lightly apply pressure to the front, and I mean like, go from gently holding it to resting your hand on it like it was a kitten.

If it still doesn’t pull up anything, start smushing the kitten a little more until you’re feeling grain being sliced and lifted up smoothly, and when you get to the end of your cut, you know how a kitten will lift their rump and tail when you pet them?

Do that with your hand so the back of the plane lifts first and see how it compares to what you were doing.

-- One hand to hold the saw, one hand to guide it, one hand to brace the work and in the sawdust OW MY THUMB!

View hokieman's profile

hokieman

195 posts in 4139 days


#10 posted 12-26-2018 12:55 PM

A Lie-Nielsen plane is an heirloom tool so it’s not the tool. Sounds like the blade needs sharpening and make sure you are not taking too thick of a shaving. Checkout the Lie-Nielsen website. They have probably 50 videos on topics like sharpening and how to use their tools. Also Rob Cosman’s website has really good videos as well. You have an excellent plane.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3393 posts in 1866 days


#11 posted 12-26-2018 02:27 PM

“Sharp” is a relative thing.

Tell us how you’re sharpening the iron I’m sure that will solve the problem.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Dwain's profile

Dwain

592 posts in 4244 days


#12 posted 12-26-2018 02:54 PM

Yes of course, now that you have spent $250 on a plane, go out and spend another $350 on ANOTHER LOW ANGLE SMOOTHER AND BLADES because you aren’t sure what is wrong. I hope this is a joke. I agree with previous advice, wax the sole of the plane, retract the blade and slowly bring it back down running the blade across the wood until you make contact. Please please PLEASE don’t go out and buy a new plane. I am pretty confident this one will work for you!


Get a Veritas with PMV-11 irons and not have to worry about sharpening:) Grain direction can be tricky, try attacking from different angles? I have had better luck smoothing with a high angle (55 deg) but then again it was a Veritas with the PMV-11 Iron:)

- Andre


-- When you earnestly believe you can compensate for a lack of skill by doubling your efforts, there is no end to what you CAN'T do

View trsnider's profile

trsnider

128 posts in 2395 days


#13 posted 12-26-2018 04:19 PM

ok—I’m not going to buy a new plane. That was never in the plans. I know the problem is mainly the user and then blade sharpness. I’ll sharpen the blade and try the back off and slowly advance technique. Christmas traveling, guests, and staining woes have interrupted this effort.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6198 posts in 2596 days


#14 posted 12-26-2018 05:11 PM

Seeing you are in Derby, have you checked out the Sunflower Woodworking Guild in Wichita? There would be several members there that would be able to help with sharpening and technique. One of them is LJ member ksSlim and IIRC, he is pretty good with planes.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5478 posts in 3628 days


#15 posted 12-26-2018 07:21 PM

Is the plane skipping or is the wood surface not flat? Whether or not the blade is sharp, the plane will seem to be skipping if there are dips or humps in the surface you are trying to plane. The longer the sole of the plane, the more skipping may seem. A long sole plane cannot follow the up and down contours of wood. This is pretty much basic when using any plane.

View NoSpace's profile

NoSpace

155 posts in 1625 days


#16 posted 12-26-2018 08:18 PM

I’m pretty new to planes as well, LN out of the box shouldn’t have major problems. Even my SW planes out of the box did pretty good. It took a few hours of planing with my first #4 to have a baseline to know when it was really dialed in.

Definitely sharpness matters, but if the LN is doing terrible out of the box it probably isn’t that. Two simple things: make sure the shaving appears at the center, and adjust to the point it barely catches anything, and then barely tighten a little at a time. as a test, try to joint the edge of a 3/4 or 4/4 inch board and try at different angles, as that is a comparatively simple procedure.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

22930 posts in 3068 days


#17 posted 12-27-2018 12:19 AM

I noticed one other source of “info” not posted….Paul Sellers. Go to his site, and watch a few of his videos.

Not that I know much about the “new-out-of-the-box” stuff…..most of the planes I use, are older than I am.

Stanley #3c, Type 11/12, SW iron…..shavings are from an Ash board.

Nothing fancy…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Robert's profile

Robert

3393 posts in 1866 days


#18 posted 12-27-2018 02:56 PM

Yeah, Bandit, and let us know how that “sharpen to 600 grit and umpteen strokes on a strop” goes. LOL.

Just poking fun I love PS. Just can’t grasp his sharpening technique yet.

And I also love my 16000 grit Shapton Santa delivered…................

TRS if you’re listening, please make a concerted effort to review/revise/revamp your honing methods and materials.

Cause that’s where your problem lies.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

22930 posts in 3068 days


#19 posted 12-27-2018 03:25 PM

Poking back…

12×12 floor tile…then a 600 medium India stone….then the paper..

up to 2,500 grit….then..

a leather strop, charged up with the green compound…

And, be aware that you can have both the back and the bevel polished up like a mirror and it would still be dull…example? Butter knife.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

826 posts in 2884 days


#20 posted 12-27-2018 07:45 PM

“Lie Nelson low angle smoothing plane”
I guess it is a “bevel up” plane.
Ensure that the iron bevel is on the correct side otherwise you could have no “relief angle” which would explain the plane skating on the wood.

Plane setup by Paul Sellers .
Although it is shown for a conventional “bevel down” plane it is still valid.

Strop making

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

826 posts in 2884 days


#21 posted 12-27-2018 08:01 PM

RWE
It is not 600, it is 250 grit

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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