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All Replies on Pre-cat lacquer flaking

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View michelswoodworks's profile

Pre-cat lacquer flaking

by michelswoodworks
posted 12-16-2018 03:16 PM


7 replies so far

View Phil Soper's profile

Phil Soper

25 posts in 196 days


#1 posted 12-16-2018 04:06 PM

You are correct. The flacking is caused by movement in that joint, something you will not stop. Any hard finish that bridges that joint will break when the wood moves. I would suggest cut the top joint with a v cutter in a router, refinish and then cut open the finish at the bottom of the v. That will allow for the movement.

Another option would be to sand enough to remove the lacquer that is bridging the joint or carefully cut the top of the joint and then respray with the special automotive clear-coat that is used on the flexible bumpers

View Rich's profile

Rich

4494 posts in 985 days


#2 posted 12-16-2018 04:32 PM

At what temperature was the table stored? Lacquer — especially catalyzed — is very brittle at low temperatures. It’s particularly an issue within a couple of days of spraying.

Also, who catalyzed the lacquer? Over catalyzing can cause checking as well due to increased brittleness.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View michelswoodworks's profile

michelswoodworks

7 posts in 192 days


#3 posted 12-16-2018 04:33 PM

Thanks for the reply. Do you think something like milesi 2k polyurethane would have enough flex to move wth the wood?

View michelswoodworks's profile

michelswoodworks

7 posts in 192 days


#4 posted 12-16-2018 04:38 PM

It was pretty cold. I would say around 40-50 degrees. There were some guys working in the shop that turned the heat up when they were working so the top was exposed to some drastic temperature changes, especially because it was stored right under the heater. I bought pre-catalyzed lacquer from a local paint store. I think it was valspar. I thinned it with lacquer thinner about 25%. The reason I sprayed it so cold was because when I was spraying my sanding sealer, I was getting a lot of graininess. I read somewhere that it was caused by spraying when temperatures are too hot so I just turned the heater off and it solved the problem.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1294 days


#5 posted 12-16-2018 04:49 PM

It doesn’t look like the chips were caused from just wood movement.
To me, and I could be wrong, it looks as if someone pick up the table by the breadboard ends and they flexed, therefore pinching the lacquer and causing it to chip.

View michelswoodworks's profile

michelswoodworks

7 posts in 192 days


#6 posted 12-16-2018 05:12 PM

I hadn’t thought of that. If that is the case, cutting a v groove and spreading the finish in the bottom of the groove should still work, right?

View Rich's profile

Rich

4494 posts in 985 days


#7 posted 12-16-2018 05:19 PM


It doesn t look like the chips were caused from just wood movement.
To me, and I could be wrong, it looks as if someone pick up the table by the breadboard ends and they flexed, therefore pinching the lacquer and causing it to chip.

- jbay

Sounds right. Unfortunately it looks like a difficult repair due to the sharp edges which will be hard to obscure.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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