LumberJocks

All Replies on KEEPING CAST RUST FREE OVER WINTER

  • Advertise with us
View GR8HUNTER's profile

KEEPING CAST RUST FREE OVER WINTER

by GR8HUNTER
posted 12-16-2018 12:27 AM


29 replies so far

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1499 posts in 1795 days


#1 posted 12-16-2018 12:33 AM

Move south! Come on down the water’s fine :-)

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile (online now)

woodshaver Tony C

6598 posts in 3740 days


#2 posted 12-16-2018 12:36 AM

I put a coat of auto past wax on my cast iron and that keeps it from rusting. Works for me!

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2788 posts in 2735 days


#3 posted 12-16-2018 12:40 AM

Use them – a lot – making swap stuff.

I don’t have problems with the cast iron in the winter, more in the summer when it is hot and humid. I do keep the shop at 50 deg or higher all winter.

You will have the condensation problem all winter if you let the shop get really cold. Since metal conducts heat well, the cold temperature causes the metal to get cold. When you turn on the head the propane combustion makes some water as a combustion product that winds up as humidity. The cold surface causes the humidity to condense and you get rust. I probably just reiterated what you already knew. I could drone on about humidity and dew points and all that if you have insomnia.

Solution – keep the shop above 50 deg or so and you should be fine.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6076 posts in 1100 days


#4 posted 12-16-2018 02:32 AM



I put a coat of auto past wax on my cast iron and that keeps it from rusting. Works for me!

- woodshaver Tony C


I do use johnsons paste wax is this not the same as auto paste wax ? :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Pjonesy's profile

Pjonesy

302 posts in 1213 days


#5 posted 12-16-2018 03:20 AM

I have a lot of success with candle wax.

-- Don't tell me it can't be done.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5278 posts in 2697 days


#6 posted 12-16-2018 03:31 AM

I keep my shop at 50 when I know I woun’t use it for a few days. If I’m using it pretty much ever day I keep it at 60 at night and bring it up to 70 when I go out in the morning. At a minimum I keep the shop at 50. I have never had a rust problem.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117627 posts in 3965 days


#7 posted 12-16-2018 03:46 AM

Paster wax and run some inexistence dehumidifiers That’s really helped me.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

669 posts in 2322 days


#8 posted 12-16-2018 03:50 AM

I had similar issues in my shop. Historically I used paste wax and covered with towels or movers blankets. Still got rust but nothing that took about 20 minutes (per item) a year. I ended up doing a few things different and have had much better results.

I did a very good cleaning of the table saw and other cast iron tools in the shop and applied Boeshield T9 per can instructions. I know one can make their own, same as….. but for less than 20 bucks done, good to go, and easy way to use up those smaller gift cards one gets. After that I found that getting air circulating in the shop as soon as I kick the kerosene heater on reduced the amount of condensation. Haven’t had any issues with condensation on cast iron tools with the fans running. Once a year I apply a light coat of Boeshield again without any cleaning. Been 5-6 years now and no rust.

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

669 posts in 2322 days


#9 posted 12-16-2018 03:52 AM

Only issues with condensation I have now are liquid filled containers.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2652 posts in 1208 days


#10 posted 12-16-2018 04:01 AM

G’A stole my thunder… however, one must make a statement so… make like a duck and fly south for winter…

Seeing as how it might be difficult to put all the machinery in a back pack… I use Silver Glide 24×7 (and also for the remaining 364 days +1 for that odd leap year)... never had issues, however, I insist on keeping the wine cask off the cast iron tables and drink out of paper cups (or suck through a tube).

Whatever you use, the secret is to regularly inspect and have a scourer and some of the product on hand all the time… well not necessarily on hand but nearby.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1287 days


#11 posted 12-16-2018 04:18 AM

Get some desiccant spray.
(as soon as I invent it)

Has anybody ever tried a spray on baby powder?

Here in Vegas, I have never had the problem with moisture.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5278 posts in 2697 days


#12 posted 12-16-2018 04:32 AM



Get some desiccant spray.
(as soon as I invent it)

Has anybody ever tried a spray on baby powder?

Here in Vegas, I have never had the problem with moisture.

- jbay


Haven’t you heard that stuff will kill you.

https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2018/12/14/18141265/johnson-johnson-talc-asbestos-lawsuits-cover-up-stock-price

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1&q=johnson%27s+baby+powder+cancer

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1287 days


#13 posted 12-16-2018 04:57 AM

This stuff you only need to use once a month for protection. ;)

Sorry GR8, I couldn’t help it.
My wife says I’m immature, but she took it back after I
quit pounding on the table and threatened not to eat my veggies.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1873 days


#14 posted 12-16-2018 06:37 AM

Correct me if I’m wrong but I think a byproduct of propane is water vapor? Don’t know what effects it might have but just throwing that out there?

When it’s cold and wet and it warms up quickly I get condensation on my tools. JPW works great as long as I put it on every couple months or after hard use.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View hairy's profile

hairy

2849 posts in 3920 days


#15 posted 12-16-2018 01:23 PM

I use dessicant packs in the drawers of my toolbox to prevent rust. That should work in your situation, covering might help. I use them in my gun safe,too.

Just an example. https://www.amazon.com/Packs-1GrCotton-20pk-Silica-Desiccants-Packets/dp/B004FC5VT4

-- My reality check bounced...

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6076 posts in 1100 days


#16 posted 12-16-2018 02:21 PM



I did a very good cleaning of the table saw and other cast iron tools in the shop and applied Boeshield T9 per can instructions. I know one can make their own, same as…..

- TravisH


curious to this how to make your own Thanks

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Redman1's profile

Redman1

13 posts in 1364 days


#17 posted 12-16-2018 02:49 PM

I don’t worry about it much. Fact of life, cast iron rusts. I clean it with WD40 and a green non-woven pad or 220 paper glued to a flat board. Put whatever paste wax I have at the time on it. It rusts again.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1204 days


#18 posted 12-16-2018 04:44 PM

Condensation forms on cast iron when warm moist air comes in contact with the colder metal. Yes, water vapor is a byproduct of burning propane and it will increase the humidity in an enclosed area unless the heater is vented. I have always used Johnson’s paste wax to protect my cast iron but since moving to a new shop, it doesn’t seem to be doing the job as well. I am currently trying T9 Boeshield but don’t have enough experience yet to pass judgement.

Do not use car wax unless you know what is in it! Most car wax contains silicone and even a tiny residue will adversely affect wood finishes.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6076 posts in 1100 days


#19 posted 12-16-2018 06:23 PM



Condensation forms on cast iron when warm moist air comes in contact with the colder metal. Yes, water vapor is a byproduct of burning propane and it will increase the humidity in an enclosed area unless the heater is vented. I have always used Johnson s paste wax to protect my cast iron but since moving to a new shop, it doesn t seem to be doing the job as well. I am currently trying T9 Boeshield but don t have enough experience yet to pass judgement.

Do not use car wax unless you know what is in it! Most car wax contains silicone and even a tiny residue will adversely affect wood finishes.

- ArtMann


I am curious if they changed the JPW formula it use to work better for me I thought :<((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile (online now)

woodshaver Tony C

6598 posts in 3740 days


#20 posted 12-16-2018 10:32 PM

I put a coat of auto past wax on my cast iron and that keeps it from rusting. Works for me!

- woodshaver Tony C

I do use johnsons paste wax is this not the same as auto paste wax ? :<))

- GR8HUNTER

Tony,
It looks like Auto wax is about the same as Johnsons’s Past Wax. The car wax I use is Carnauba Wax.

I found this info on line….

What is in Johnson’s Paste Wax?
Carnauba wax is a naturally derived film former that can also be found in cosmetics and skin care products. It creates a protective coating or shine on a surface. Carnauba wax comes from the carnauba palm tree – it forms on the leaves of the palm to protect the leaves from heat and keep their moisture from evaporating.

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2652 posts in 1208 days


#21 posted 12-17-2018 12:28 AM



..... Do not use car wax unless you know what is in it! Most car wax contains silicone and even a tiny residue will adversely affect wood finishes.
- ArtMann

Totally agree with A’M’. If you want to experiment… try scotch instead of whiskey… nevertheless, ensure there is no silicone in the product… silicone may save you a few minutes in elbow grease and if you wish may see your own reflection… but is just about guaranteed to screw up your valuable timber/finish creation… and you don’t need much (silicone) for that proverbial snafu!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1204 days


#22 posted 12-17-2018 02:35 AM

I don’t think a change in formula is it. I have been using the same can of Johnson’s for maybe 10 years and it just doesn’t work quite as well as it used to. I’m just guessing the humidity in my new shop is higher due to a different type of heat.

Condensation forms on cast iron when warm moist air comes in contact with the colder metal. Yes, water vapor is a byproduct of burning propane and it will increase the humidity in an enclosed area unless the heater is vented. I have always used Johnson s paste wax to protect my cast iron but since moving to a new shop, it doesn t seem to be doing the job as well. I am currently trying T9 Boeshield but don t have enough experience yet to pass judgement.

Do not use car wax unless you know what is in it! Most car wax contains silicone and even a tiny residue will adversely affect wood finishes.

- ArtMann

I am curious if they changed the JPW formula it use to work better for me I thought :<((

- GR8HUNTER


View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6076 posts in 1100 days


#23 posted 12-17-2018 03:06 AM



I don t think a change in formula is it. I have been using the same can of Johnson s for maybe 10 years and it just doesn t work quite as well as it used to. I m just guessing the humidity in my new shop is higher due to a different type of heat.

- ArtMann

I am curious if they changed the JPW formula it use to work better for me I thought :<((

- GR8HUNTER

- ArtMann


I have done more reading on it no where it says its a rust inhibitor I think I might try boesheild T-9 :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2652 posts in 1208 days


#24 posted 12-17-2018 06:44 AM



.... I m just guessing the humidity in my new shop is higher due to a different type of heat.
- ArtMann

Wooooo, wooooo, wooooo! Bleeding global warming… even my beer doesn’t stay as cold as it used to…

Sorry guys… us greenies have to get our foot into every door…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7387 posts in 2586 days


#25 posted 12-17-2018 07:17 AM

curious to this how to make your own Thanks
- GR8HUNTER

From the Boeshield T-9 page, it is a: ”... unique formulation of solvent carrier and paraffin wax coating ...”. A quick look at the MSDS shows that it’s basically just a solvent (kerosene/mineral spirits and Naphtha), up to 25% mineral oil, and 2.5% or less paraffin wax.

BTW: Johnsons paste wax is Paraffin, Carnauba, Microcrystalline wax dissolved in Naphtha.

Common ingredient: Paraffin wax. Pretty easy to dissolve it in a solvent and use it for all sorts of stuff.

You can add the mineral oil, but I find it makes things messy and causes it to take forever to dry. YMMV. Paraffin can be obtained from your local grocery store by the pound (Gulf wax in the ‘canning’ section).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6125 posts in 2592 days


#26 posted 12-17-2018 10:00 AM

Well from my point of view there is no way to prevent Cast Iron from developing surface rust regardless of the season, bar maybe chrome or Gold plating it.
So in saying that as others have reported covering it from the air will reduce the effect however it will still rust somewhere and it will be accelerated by all sorts of Gremlins, drops of sweat, summertime handprints, anytime and the usual items it comes in contact with in its daily use. Titebond glue is a real baddie!
Not much different to your car, you need to clean and maintain it on a regular basis, they are the facts, its a regular maintenance task as part of being a woodie. (metal engineering shops are no different but here is possibly more oil and that sort of preserative stuff around) You could possibly liken it to taking a shower every day, basic hygeine/maintenance.

What do I use:-
Inox MX3 mostly and Inox MX4 if I am leaving the gear for a while when goofing off visiting the family, but its no magic bullet, ... I still need to check, clean and maintain gear upon my return, it just makes the job a little less time consuming.
Buy it in ltr or gallon containers and use trigger spray applicators, try to avoid buying the pressure pack cans unless really nesessary as it will cost you big time in the long run if used regularly.
I also have silver glide but dont use it a great deal as its reasonably expensive but just the same works well.

Scotch brite pads are a must.

-- Regards Rob

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

9496 posts in 1526 days


#27 posted 12-17-2018 02:46 PM

I use CRC 3-36 once a year or so. Spray it on and let it soak overnight then wipe off the excess in the morning. Then I put a coat of JPW on whenever I see surface rust start to show its ugly face. Once a month or so on average.

I use Paraffin dissolved in MS like Brad shows for my hand planes because it seems to give extra lubrication which is nice in use.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1351 posts in 1882 days


#28 posted 12-17-2018 04:30 PM

When I need heavy duty rust protection on cast iron,
I use Loctite Extend, a clear rust converter neutralizer spray.
It is vinyl acrylic copolymer coating that contains formic acid to convert red iron oxide to black iron oxide and stops additional rust formation.

Clean the old wax/grease/dirt from tool with solvent scrub. Spray light coating on when solvent is dry.
Done.
IME – Will stop new rust forming for more than year, as long as water doesn’t sit on surface.

I use it to seal pores in cast iron on all my tools every couple of years, basically whenever sweaty palm prints start appearing as dark spots on cast iron tables.
Spray it on de-greased cast iron, let it dry, then rub in some carnuaba wax with scotch brite (white if clean, grey/green if dirty/rusty). Buff wax residue off when dry. Use tool. The excess polymer gets buffed off the surface as you apply wax. Never had any issues with residue using oil or water based finishes.
Protect my cast iron with wax only between semi-annual maintenance.

It is available at most Auto parts and farm/implement stores. Permatex is part of Loctite, and sells same product as Rust Treatment

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1381 posts in 1204 days


#29 posted 12-17-2018 07:40 PM

I was just thinking about why I have been having trouble with rust and another possible explanation came to me. Normally, I use my wood shop year round but not in 2018. This year, I built a new house and shop and did hardly any woodworking. I just moved the equipment and let it sit. It might be something as simple as just neglect.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com