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All Replies on Attaching hairpin legs to side table

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View Noel's profile

Attaching hairpin legs to side table

by Noel
posted 12-15-2018 06:29 PM


14 replies so far

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2790 posts in 3446 days


#1 posted 12-15-2018 06:41 PM

Is this a table where people will sit at or just a small accent table? If there is any weight that is going to be put on it ie. if people are going to sit at it, you probably will run into trouble with such a thin top, regardless of what screws you use. If it is just an accent table with no racking forces, I would just use the 3/4” screws and pre-drill the holes very carefully. You’ll still have 1/8” clearance from having them poke through.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Noel's profile

Noel

86 posts in 371 days


#2 posted 12-15-2018 06:54 PM

Thanks Charles. It’s just an accent table that will go beside an arm chair in the family room.

-- Just make the cut

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

910 posts in 1666 days


#3 posted 12-15-2018 11:07 PM

As Manitario said, very carefully pre-drill for the screws. With the holes pre-drilled the sharp point on the screws will serve no purpose. You can grind or file off 1/8” with no harm. If you want to have a little more insurance, put a small washer under the head of the screw (if they are not counter sunk into the metal bracket). BTW, if the screws are flathead and countersunk into the bracket, then you loose the thickness of the bracket to help hold the point of the screw back from the finished surface. This would make it even more important to grind off a bit of the point. Or, buy some shorter screws.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1463 days


#4 posted 12-15-2018 11:09 PM

Take a piece of your walnut scrap and drive in a 3/4” and see what happens.
Countersink the brackets and do another.
You’ll have your answers.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2233 posts in 1167 days


#5 posted 12-16-2018 12:58 AM

Combine the previous 2 suggestions. Use the fattest stubbiest lag bolts that will fit through the holes with a pre-drilled pilot hole. Don’t use the tapered head screws. Then use a socket or box wrench to tighten it down good and tight. You will be fine. First use the legs and the washers and the bolts on a piece of scrap.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Noel's profile

Noel

86 posts in 371 days


#6 posted 12-16-2018 01:09 AM

All great ideas – thanks! So the screws/bolts will bite ok if I grind off the tips, as long as I have pre-drilled pilot holes? Never heard of that one, but it’s perfect for this application. I get the perfect length screw and nice and stubby. Also like the idea of lags – they will allow for controlled turning of screws. Will test on scraps before doing anything. Thanks again, folks!

-- Just make the cut

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2233 posts in 1167 days


#7 posted 12-16-2018 01:18 AM

Yes. The scrap will give you an idea of how large to make the pilot holes. Depends on how wide the points are after you grind off the tips. The bolt hex heads will enable you to crank them down much tighter than a phillips or straight screw driver.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1463 days


#8 posted 12-16-2018 01:23 AM

It’s 3/4” thick wood! Lag screws??
No disrespect but I think it’s getting way over thought.
Use a 3/4” pan head or counter sink and use a 3/4” Flat head.
Pre drill and screw. not much more to it.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2790 posts in 3446 days


#9 posted 12-16-2018 02:04 AM



It s 3/4” thick wood! Lag screws??
No disrespect but I think it s getting way over thought.
Use a 3/4” pan head or counter sink and use a 3/4” Flat head.
Pre drill and screw. not much more to it.

- jbay

Agree. There’s 5 screws per leg, the 3/4” walnut is going to break long before the screws will. If you don’t have any racking forces on the table, it will be fine. I have 4 legs identical to that holding up a 200lb liquor cabinet with #8 screws in 7/8” walnut.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Noel's profile

Noel

86 posts in 371 days


#10 posted 12-16-2018 02:21 AM

Well, since I can’t find suitable hex head screws, I’ll test on scrap, pre-drill & use pan heads (legs are not countersunk). Charles, did you use glue or epoxy, in addition to screws?

Note to self: next time, thickness to 7/8” or 1” instead of 3/4”. Might look better, too. Thanks for the help,all.

-- Just make the cut

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2790 posts in 3446 days


#11 posted 12-16-2018 02:29 AM

Nope, just screws

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1046 posts in 3646 days


#12 posted 12-16-2018 11:14 AM



Pre drill and screw. not much more to it.
- jbay

^^^
This dude knows how to screw!

Try and use a deep, course thread, particle board type screw as well. Better hold/much more difficult to strip out. Especially with shorter screws.

Ignore the Phillips head and find some with a Robertson head. Only woodworkers who like Red Oak and Alder use Phillips….low grade stuff.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View Noel's profile

Noel

86 posts in 371 days


#13 posted 12-16-2018 01:41 PM

Tony, easier said than done to find Robertson pan heads with drywall or particle board coarse thread.

-- Just make the cut

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

910 posts in 1666 days


#14 posted 12-16-2018 04:53 PM

The screws that came with the legs are probably just fine in-so-far as strength and holding power is concerned. You just need to make sure they are not going to penetrate too far. Carefully measure and test in scrap then use any of the techniques above if necessary. If the leg brackets are not countersunk, the thickness of the bracket will likely provide enough safety margin. Your pilot holes should be equal to the diameter of the screw shank at the base of the screw threads. You can determine this close enough by eye by holding the drill bit up against the screw. Again, test it in scrap. Ordinarily, I would suggest that you err on the side of smaller drill size. But, In oak and other hardwoods, it is easy to drill too small.

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