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View meneldor's profile

Table Saw Recommendations

by meneldor
posted 12-15-2018 01:41 AM


26 replies so far

View Boomer34's profile

Boomer34

7 posts in 171 days


#1 posted 12-15-2018 01:46 AM

I am in the same boat…and have researched and am leaning to these same saws. It’s hard to not look a few hundred dollars above the current one you are leaning to, and think you should just make the jump up for the added features. I am probably deciding between that Delta and the Grizzly…unless I find something used and quality on CL/FB.

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

597 posts in 1825 days


#2 posted 12-15-2018 03:01 AM

I am a hobbyist woodworker, and Jet and grizzly have become my go to tools for my shop. Good quality and bang for the buck.
With your budget, and the tools listed, I would go with the grizzly table saw.
I like the grizzly out of the saws listed, Best options/features for the price. And when it comes time to move, all three saws would get strapped to a pallet. I think the full cabinet Grizzly would handle moving the best.
I agree with Boomer on the added features. $200 more for the G0833p. And used table saws can be great finds. Just make sure you get a used saw that is new enough to have a riving knife.

-- John

View bgilb's profile

bgilb

93 posts in 3422 days


#3 posted 12-15-2018 04:07 AM

I’d save up 700$ more or so and get a sawstop

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

250 posts in 822 days


#4 posted 12-15-2018 04:33 AM



I d save up 700$ more or so and get a sawstop

- bgilb

Ditto on the Sawstop.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8278 posts in 3739 days


#5 posted 12-15-2018 01:06 PM

If you have 220v, or can get it easily, the Grizzly G1023RL pushes the budget by $10, but is substantially more saw than the hybrids. It’ll weigh close to 150# more than the hybrids, but is well worth that trade off IMO….none of these is overly portable anyway, so all will take some effort during a move. Actual footprint is about the same for all of them. The G1023RL is a full step up in class, and is a well proven saw lifetime saw. It’s got much beefier innerds, a beefier fence, and nearly twice the horsepower of the hybrids. Simply put, it’ll effortlessly plow through just about anything you’ll through at it for the rest of your life.

If for someone reason the G1023RL isn’t attainable, the Jet Proshop has the best track record of those hybrids.

G1023RL guts:

Hybrid guts:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View meneldor's profile

meneldor

4 posts in 161 days


#6 posted 12-15-2018 01:51 PM

Thanks for the responses! I don’t have 220 in my garage. While it would be relatively easy to get it installed I don’t want to invest in adding 220 just to have to move when PCS time approaches. Odds are wherever my next move will be will not have a 220 circuit either.

In reference to comment about sawstop: that is definitely an option I’m willing to entertain but would need a bit more time to save. Particularly would look at the contractor and 30 inch 1.75 cabinet. Braking system aside, is the saw worth the over $1k leap from, for example, the G0833p?

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1365 posts in 1179 days


#7 posted 12-15-2018 03:49 PM

If you ignore the value of the safety feature, then you can buy the same woodworking capability for a lot less money or you can buy a more capable saw for the same price. The safety feature isn’t worth it to me because I have already avoided accidents for over 40 years and I practice the same safety procedures I learned in high school in the 1960’s. If you are new to this, Sawstop might be of more value.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8278 posts in 3739 days


#8 posted 12-15-2018 04:17 PM


..... Braking system aside, is the saw worth the over $1k leap from, for example, the G0833p?

- meneldor

Not IMHO. The stock configuration of the contractor saw gives up some features….it comes with a fairly lame fence for a saw in this price range, plus has stamped steel wings vs solid cast iron, and has the outboard motor configuration. The safety feature would be the main reason I’d buy this particular model, not its value relative to other saws. I could skimp and get by with steel wings if I had to, but a good fence is a basic “must have” on any decent saw IMO. By the time you fit the saw with a decent fence and upgrade the wings, you’ve added several hundred dollars in addition to the premium already paid for the safety brake. At that point the PCS starts becoming a more attractive value (...again, just my opinion).

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

3927 posts in 2352 days


#9 posted 12-15-2018 04:49 PM

FIRST THINGS FIRST

How big of a space do you have?

What kind of woodworking do you want to do. Cabinets and bigger things or smaller boxes and toys?

Do you have 220 VAC?

Remember that you will need to buy saw blades and a better miter gauge

Bottom line is are you looking at a cabinet saw or a good smaller saw.

If you are doing bigger projects with plywood, you may want to have a circular saw and edge guide along with a table saw.

View SteveMcG's profile

SteveMcG

2 posts in 902 days


#10 posted 12-15-2018 04:54 PM

I own the Grizzly hybrid, which I purchased after similar and considerable paralysis. No regrets. Plus, the savings allowed me to pick up a decent dust collector, too.

I cut my finger open on a craftsman contractor model once. Even that wouldn’t make me triple the cost for the saw stop. Be safe, use the riving knife, keep your blade low over the stock, know where your hands are, and KEEP FOCUS. Then own up to your mistakes. Saw stop’s not for me at that cost. Just my opinion, of course. If one of my daughters decided they wanted to play in the shop (hint: they don’t, despite my pleas, threats, asks and begging) then yeah, I may have another opinion, so… consider your legacy, too, when making that decision.

View meneldor's profile

meneldor

4 posts in 161 days


#11 posted 12-15-2018 05:09 PM

Redoak, I have a 2 car garage but shop is only half of it. I don’t have 220 and I don’t plan on adding it due to the frequent moves as a member of the military. I am looking for a smaller saw, hybrid or similar as opposed to a full cabinet at least at this particular point in time. I have a circular saw with edge guide so panel breakdowns can be done that way. Honestly I don’t utilize plywood for much outside of shop projects.

Steve, do you have the G0771Z? If so, what are your thoughts on it and the fence?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1849 days


#12 posted 12-15-2018 05:11 PM

A true cabinet saw will take up the same footprint as any other saw you are considering. You probably have to pull the fence and motor off when moving so it won’t be that bad to move around will a dolly. I pull the tops fence and motor to move one.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View moke's profile

moke

1367 posts in 3140 days


#13 posted 12-15-2018 05:51 PM

The problem I have with grizzly is you are subject to their delivery network…I have two tools for them, one was delivered by a good conscientious person ant the other by an idiot. Who wasn’t there when they said they would and damaged it….while Grizzly has a good Customer Service, you are still waiting anohter week or two and doing the repair yourself.

I have a saw stop and love it. But, we have endless arguments whether the saw is worth it and how much the braking system adds and on and on….bottom line is buy what you think is right for you. Yes the braking system adds more, but what about the saw? Power is major consideration too…...so is the fence…..look them over, gather data, like you are doing here and make an informed decision. If safety is a bigger deal…..get the saw stop, if not get someting else. The politics of it should be put aside, they sold saw stop about a year ago and the original owner is gone…..how long do we need to beat that drum?

My point is I would buy from a local brick and mortar store that is in or close to your community that has delivery with a Tommy lift. I only bought the grizzly things because they were not carried around here or close….(they were metal working tools). The brick and mortar stores need your dollars to stay around. They are fighting a two front war…the internet and the big box boys…..and lets face it, for most of us they are handy to have around, even though you may have to pay a little more.

Just my .02….....

-- Mike

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2629 posts in 937 days


#14 posted 12-15-2018 06:39 PM



If you have 220v, or can get it easily, the Grizzly G1023RL pushes the budget by $10, but is substantially more saw than the hybrids. It ll weigh close to 150# more than the hybrids, but is well worth that trade off IMO….none of these is overly portable anyway, so all will take some effort during a move. Actual footprint is about the same for all of them. The G1023RL is a full step up in class, and is a well proven saw lifetime saw. It s got much beefier innerds, a beefier fence, and nearly twice the horsepower of the hybrids. Simply put, it ll effortlessly plow through just about anything you ll through at it for the rest of your life.

If for someone reason the G1023RL isn t attainable, the Jet Proshop has the best track record of those hybrids.

G1023RL guts:

Hybrid guts:

- knotscott

Only thing I could add to that is until Dec 30, the 1023RL is only 1395.00 plus shipping, so it would eat a 1500 dollar bill, plus 10 bux, and that saw is a lot of bang for that buck. I currently have a Canadian General 350, which is right tilt, and older than the current crop with riving knives. I’m thinking I will sell my General, and buy the Grizz.

-- Think safe, be safe

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2629 posts in 937 days


#15 posted 12-15-2018 06:48 PM


FIRST THINGS FIRST

How big of a space do you have?

What kind of woodworking do you want to do. Cabinets and bigger things or smaller boxes and toys?

Do you have 220 VAC?

Remember that you will need to buy saw blades and a better miter gauge

Bottom line is are you looking at a cabinet saw or a good smaller saw.

If you are doing bigger projects with plywood, you may want to have a circular saw and edge guide along with a table saw.

- Redoak49

Footprint won’t differ enough to make a difference. However you are looking at lifetime saws (Cab saws), as opposed to saws that most woodworkers look to replace as soon as they can. Looking at CL, you will see tons of contractors, and hardly any Cab saws. Hybrids are just a contractor (guts and motor) wearing a skirt. Don’t wanna gp for a cab saw, your best bet $$$$ wise is to rehab an older Sears and Robuck 113 saw

-- Think safe, be safe

View Fiddy's profile

Fiddy

211 posts in 1674 days


#16 posted 12-15-2018 07:07 PM

I had the Jet hybrid for years and it was a great saw. Fence was great and had a nice large table, actually probably a bit bigger than the PM66 I ended up upgrading to. As with all hybrids, at least I believe this is the case, squaring the blade to the table is somewhat a pain, but once it’s done, it’s done for some time.

Having used the Jet for years I can vouch that it was a great saw. I did run a thin kerf Woodworker blade on it and that also helped the saw out where it lacked in power to get though some thicker hardwoods. Dust collection was pretty week, but my current in none better really either, but worth noting I suppose.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

586 posts in 274 days


#17 posted 12-15-2018 07:17 PM

I have the Grizzly G00771Z, A good inexpensive table saw for the hobbyist. But if your always moving from base to base, you might want to consider jobsite or worksite table saw for mobility and price, and upgrade to a really nice table saw once your in more of a permanent residence.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3518 days


#18 posted 12-16-2018 12:30 PM

I am fairly settled where I am now and I still think twice about investing large dollar amounts in a large saw that is difficult to move. Ultimately i’d end up selling it if I moved…In a situation where you know you are going to move alot i’d stay with something simple as contractor saw, or a hybrid at most. Maybe even a nice job site saw and throw a good blade on it, that will keep you way below budget and you’d be surprised how accurate a bosch 4100 can cut. I don’t know what your other equipment looks like, maybe its all easy to take along with you, but a cabinet saw is a permanent fixture and while you have a healthy budget the moving thing is the real catch for you.

Also not sure anyone mentioned going used, I always eyeball the used market and there are sawstops being sold all the time. Ironically the reason most people seem to mention they are selling is them is due to a move. Either way, it’s a good way to grab one for less money.

View meneldor's profile

meneldor

4 posts in 161 days


#19 posted 12-16-2018 03:31 PM

Thanks to everyone for the replies. I think I will hold off on the nicer cabinet saws until I’m in a more permanent place with dedicated shop space and 240. As much as I don’t like it, the previous comments suggesting a job site saw for my situation make a lot of sense. Especially considering I could move overseas or to a place without a garage or other workspace. I’ll still have a look at the big box contractor saws but will also take a look at the job site offerings from Dewalt and Bosch.

View michelswoodworks's profile

michelswoodworks

7 posts in 160 days


#20 posted 12-16-2018 05:28 PM

I have a ridgid r4512. It’s called a contractor saw. It works pretty well for me. I started out on sawstops in high school which I love. Aside from the safety feature, they are excellent saws, accurate and easy to use. Some people disagree, but I think the safety feature is worth it. The reality is, sometimes shit happens. Yes you can practice great safety habits, but it only takes once for a freak accident to happen or for you to get stupid and try something unsafe. I didn’t get a sawstop because if space and money. If I get a larger space I intend on saving up and upgrading. I’ve used deltas and jets a few times, but they haven’t really compared to the sawstop in my opinion. The reason I mention the ridgid, is because you can get that and maybe another tool with your $1500 budget. Especially if your a hand tool woodworker, and intend on doing moist of your joinery by hand, you don’t need a table saw to cut joinery. I’m assuming your just going to be ripping stick to size and possibly cross cutting to length. Even if you do plan on cutting joinery with it, it still works pretty well. They retail for $600 at Home Depot. After tax and a good blade your looking at $700. That leaves you with $800 to have fun with!

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

49 posts in 3518 days


#21 posted 12-16-2018 06:26 PM



Thanks to everyone for the replies. I think I will hold off on the nicer cabinet saws until I’m in a more permanent place with dedicated shop space and 240. As much as I don’t like it, the previous comments suggesting a job site saw for my situation make a lot of sense. Especially considering I could move overseas or to a place without a garage or other workspace. I’ll still have a look at the big box contractor saws but will also take a look at the job site offerings from Dewalt and Bosch.

- meneldor

Forrest Blade on the 4100 and it’s a force of a portable saw. I’ve never had any issues with mine. If want to cut giant sheet goods thats the only time i resent the saw, but I use my tracksaw for that. There is always a compromise somewhere, doesn’t matter what saw you get.

View dannmarks's profile

dannmarks

886 posts in 945 days


#22 posted 12-16-2018 10:24 PM

I have had my Grizzly 1023 since 1980 So I guess that is 38 years now.

I has served me well and it is the lesser of the two being promoted. I just purchased a new incra Fence for it simply because I wanted to fancy it up a bit. I had a router table mounted on the railings until yesterday for the last 35 years. This has been the heart of my shop all of these years. I am not sold on Jet tools at all. Many others are probably wonderful as well. But I have enjoyed my Grizzly G1023 for all these years and will pass this down to the Grandson some day.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1849 days


#23 posted 12-17-2018 02:52 AM

A large Rubbermaid tub is the perfect size for a motor cover.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2255 posts in 2353 days


#24 posted 12-17-2018 03:23 AM

The Delta or the Bosch would most likely fit your needs. I have the Bosch 4100 (the Delta wasnt out yet, probably would have chosen it, been awhile but I think the table is larger with more infeed to the blade). I use a Frued LU84 std thickness 50t bladeand can bury the blade in oak without issue – just cant ram it through as fast as a 220v saw, but Im not cutting 3” oak very often. No problem at all with 5/4 stuff. it gets it done for me

View Plyterra's profile

Plyterra

3 posts in 159 days


#25 posted 12-17-2018 11:50 AM

Hi friends! I want to advise you an excellent wood processing plant specializing in plywood, they supply their products to 48 countries. More than 20 years of successful work! Click on the link https://www.plyterra.com

View Robert's profile

Robert

3374 posts in 1844 days


#26 posted 12-17-2018 01:59 PM

With the budget limitations and outlook for upgrading, right now I would look around for an old Delta or Rockwell contractors saw with a good fence (stay away from the old Craftsman saws!!).

You’ll save money and have a machine that will do the job until you decide to pull the trigger on a cabinet saw.

The old saws don’t lose value very fast. In 3 or 4 years you’ll probably recoup 80-90% when you sell it.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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