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Should I buy a Band Saw...Need some advice

by sawneck
posted 12-14-2018 01:35 AM


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60 replies

60 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10844 posts in 1787 days


#1 posted 12-14-2018 01:56 AM

When you understand a bandsaw. There is no mystery. Although a few are truly fiddly, most are not.

A bandsaw like that is good for resawing. You could do some scrolling if you wanted. But mainly resawing. So I if that’s not what you are getting it for I’d do a bit more reevaluating.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#2 posted 12-14-2018 02:00 AM



When you understand a bandsaw. There is no mystery. Although a few are truly fiddly, most are not.

A bandsaw like that is good for resawing. You could do some scrolling if you wanted. But mainly resawing. So I if that’s not what you are getting it for I’d do a bit more reevaluating.

- TheFridge

thanks for the reply…Yeah i’d like to have the option to resaw, but it’s not a driving factor for me. i have a local kid who sells live edge stuff kiln dried for decent prices I imagine i will dabble with that..I see myself using it to cut tenons, scrolling and resawing overall.

What saw would you suggest?

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

427 posts in 727 days


#3 posted 12-14-2018 02:01 AM

My knee-jerk reaction was: “yes.”

But… usually the best way to go is to get your feet wet with a couple projects. Find the type of projects you want and go make them using what you have. When you struggle through the issues that come up on those projects, that will determine what tools you need. At that point, go and buy what you need for the next project and enjoy.

That is a nice saw though. If I had the budget I might have picked one like it. I ended up with a Grizzly G0555 variant. It needs some alignment work but simply having one is awesome – no comparison to a jigsaw. I’ve done a little resawing, some minimal “scroll” work, but mostly for longer shaping curves or small stuff that wouldn’t be safe on the table saw. It’s really versatile

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2062 posts in 2099 days


#4 posted 12-14-2018 02:05 AM

You should get two bandsaws a small one and a big one. 14 inch and a 20 inch or bigger.
I use my bandsaws more then my table saw.
Bandsaws open up a whole new area of woodworking

-- Aj

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#5 posted 12-14-2018 02:14 AM



My knee-jerk reaction was: “yes.”

But… usually the best way to go is to get your feet wet with a couple projects. Find the type of projects you want and go make them using what you have. When you struggle through the issues that come up on those projects, that will determine what tools you need. At that point, go and buy what you need for the next project and enjoy.

That is a nice saw though. If I had the budget I might have picked one like it. I ended up with a Grizzly G0555 variant. It needs some alignment work but simply having one is awesome – no comparison to a jigsaw. I ve done a little resawing, some minimal “scroll” work, but mostly for longer shaping curves or small stuff that wouldn t be safe on the table saw. It s really versatile

- jamsomito

thank you! Very well said…I have a trusty jigsaw that i’ve had for years that i could use, but like you said I do understand it’s just not the same workflow as a band saw. Good to hear the versatility is there…I should mention i’d like to have a shop with the capabilities that give me the option to get projects done with efficiency (since time with 3 kids is scarce) and fun. But that comes at a cost and it doesn’t necessarily mean I need a band saw.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#6 posted 12-14-2018 02:17 AM



You should get two bandsaws a small one and a big one. 14 inch and a 20 inch or bigger.
I use my bandsaws more then my table saw.
Bandsaws open up a whole new area of woodworking

- Aj2

Hah! so riniging endorsement for the Band saw purchase here! lol…i will have to take it step by step but i was next to an 18 inch Laguna the other day and i was super impressed by it.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1806 posts in 904 days


#7 posted 12-14-2018 02:23 AM

Do not pass go! Grab the 1412.

At work so no time for a long post but here's my review. and my short and sweet video.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5261 posts in 2652 days


#8 posted 12-14-2018 02:28 AM

Should I buy a Band Saw

Of course you should. Are you going to make furniture? with graceful curves? Then yes you need a band saw. Are you going to make band saw boxes? You need a band saw. Do you want the ability to re-saw lumber into different thicknesses? Then yes, you need a band saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Aj2

2062 posts in 2099 days


#9 posted 12-14-2018 02:53 AM

The 1412 is a good saw but it’s still a 14 wheel.
Bigger saws use longer blades that last longer have stiffer frames. And bigger table. I never thought I would want a saw bigger then my 20inch but I do. It has a 14 ft blade and will cut circles around my pm 14.
Good luck

-- Aj

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10844 posts in 1787 days


#10 posted 12-14-2018 02:55 AM



Should I buy a Band Saw

Of course you should. Are you going to make furniture? with graceful curves? Then yes you need a band saw. Are you going to make band saw boxes? You need a band saw. Do you want the ability to re-saw lumber into different thicknesses? Then yes, you need a band saw.

- bondogaposis

I change my mind and go with this answer.

I have 2 -14”. One with a riser. I use the crap out of them. So yeah. If you want to build furniture. I’m also of the opinion you could use a bandsaw.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#11 posted 12-14-2018 02:55 AM


Do not pass go! Grab the 1412.

At work so no time for a long post but here s my review. and my short and sweet video.

- Andybb

lol..Nice video review..Maybe you should start a YT channel! What resaw blade did you have on it?

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#12 posted 12-14-2018 02:59 AM



Should I buy a Band Saw

Of course you should. Are you going to make furniture? with graceful curves? Then yes you need a band saw. Are you going to make band saw boxes? You need a band saw. Do you want the ability to re-saw lumber into different thicknesses? Then yes, you need a band saw.

- bondogaposis

all good points…Thanks for the input and covering most of what I have my eye on doing with a band saw…first project is a band saw box…Second is going to pull me away from it a bit, I want to build a dumbed down Roubo bench. I figure i could try cutting tenons on it. after that who knows. That alone will probably take 6 months to get done with.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2237 posts in 3245 days


#13 posted 12-14-2018 03:01 AM

I gave away two or three Craftsman before I bought a Powermatic. I was not and many years later remain not disappointed in spending the money. What a HUGE difference there is between Craftsman toys and a real bandsaw.

I wouldn’t part with my cabinet saw for love nor money, but my bandsaws (now I have one for re-saw and one for scrolling) see more use than does my table saw.

For a quick rough cut of a small pieces, it’s a lot safer than the table saw. Unlike the table saw, it can scroll. Then there is the re-saw thing.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1806 posts in 904 days


#14 posted 12-14-2018 03:02 AM

Do not pass go! Grab the 1412.

At work so no time for a long post but here s my review. and my short and sweet video.

- Andybb

lol..Nice video review..Maybe you should start a YT channel! What resaw blade did you have on it?

- sawneck

Laguna Resaw King 3/4”. Still cuts hardwood like butter after a year. I’m not advocating for the expensive blade or really even for Laguna. It’s just that I spent 2 years trying to get a subpar BS to do what the 1412 does without batting an eye.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View TDSpade's profile

TDSpade

108 posts in 2717 days


#15 posted 12-14-2018 05:49 AM

I just bought my 3rd bandsaw a Jet – 14” Model JWBS-14CS. I turned my delta 14” Platinum Edition bandsaw into a belt sander. I put together a good home brew metal backing platen for it. It works very well. I buy ¾ inch sanding belts for it from woodworker’s supply. I also have an 18 inch jet bandsaw I use for re-sawing, milling, cutting blanks for my lathe, etc..

I enjoy using all of my wood working tools, but my favorite tools are bandsaws and lathes.

Having said that, I worked for a propane company as a service tech for over 30 years, just retired this last march. In all of the hobby and, pro wood shops I saw over the years, the owners seldom or never used their bandsaw. And most talked about selling the one they had.

I just never understood that. I think a bandsaw is one of the most versatile wood shop tools there is.

-- For every expert, there is an equal and opposite expert.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

507 posts in 212 days


#16 posted 12-14-2018 07:38 AM

The question is what size do you get, not if I should buy one. The size depends what you plan on cutting with it. And the tooth count. If resawing, then your looking at the maximum cutting height needed ( 6”, 10”, 12”, etc. ). For scroll sawing, get a good scroll saw also.

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#17 posted 12-14-2018 11:33 AM


I just bought my 3rd bandsaw a Jet – 14” Model JWBS-14CS. I turned my delta 14” Platinum Edition bandsaw into a belt sander. I put together a good home brew metal backing platen for it. It works very well. I buy ¾ inch sanding belts for it from woodworker s supply. I also have an 18 inch jet bandsaw I use for re-sawing, milling, cutting blanks for my lathe, etc..

I enjoy using all of my wood working tools, but my favorite tools are bandsaws and lathes.

Having said that, I worked for a propane company as a service tech for over 30 years, just retired this last march. In all of the hobby and, pro wood shops I saw over the years, the owners seldom or never used their bandsaw. And most talked about selling the one they had.

I just never understood that. I think a bandsaw is one of the most versatile wood shop tools there is.

- TDSpade

this^^ is kind of what i am referring to. I feel like alot of people feel this way about the band saw. I was actually talking to my neighbor about it, he’s a handy guy with some tools and he said don’t get one you will never use it. I think it’s advice like that and the fact I know of very few people who actually have one and use it alot. I don’t want to be in that position where I am looking to sell it in a year.

I am by no means looking to use it everyday (it’s not for production just hobby) for it to feel justified, heck if I use it once twice a month that would be plenty. My guess is there will be times i am all over it using it and then other times when other things take my time away from me and it sits. I just want to hear from people who do own them what their experience is and how they feel about their purchases after the fact. Based on the responses here it’s a smart purchase. lol

Congrats on your retirement btw…Now you have PLENTY of time to use your equipment!

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MPython

91 posts in 113 days


#18 posted 12-14-2018 01:56 PM

I know people who use their bandsaws daily. Some would give-up their table saws before they part with their bandsaws. Not me. In order of importance the large machines in my shop are:

1. Table saw
2. Jointer/Planer (or individual jointer and planer)
3. Drill Press
4. Bandsaw
5. Lathe
6. Everything Else

My bench is perhaps my most important large piece, but it’s not a machine (obviously).

You mentioned that you had some large pieces equipment, but I didn’t see a table saw on your list. As I said, some people function very well with a bandsaw alone, but (I think) most of us prefer a table saw for precision, accuracy and repeatability. Ripping, cross cutting, miter cuts, dados and other precision straight cuts are more accurate and much easier on a table saw. These cuts are the meat and potatoes of flat-work woodworking. You will need a way to dress and dimension stock. This is where the jointer and the planer come into play. You can do it by hand with hand planes and that is rewarding in its own way, but it takes a long time and produces a lot of sweat. For drilling precision holes, you need a drill press, and one can double as a drum sander. The one function at which a bandsaw excels is resewing thicker boards into thinner ones. This is not an everyday operation for most of us and there are other ways of doing it but they have their limitations; and doing it by hand is labor intensive. You can saw curves with a hand held jig saw, but a band saw does it better in many cases. Again, sawing curves is not an everyday operation in flat-work woodworking. If it were me just starting out with serious woodworking, I would purchase the machines in the order I listed above. The bandsaw is certainly on the list, but it is not at the top.

By the way, I have a Laguna LT18 bandsaw. Laguna makes a nice saw.

I should qualify this by saying that everybody has their own unique style of working and there will be many who disagree with my comments and preferences here, so take them with a grain of salt.

Hank

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WayneC

14275 posts in 4398 days


#19 posted 12-14-2018 02:01 PM

They are very useful tools. I don’t think you would have any regrets.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Peteybadboy

642 posts in 2250 days


#20 posted 12-14-2018 02:07 PM

Do you have a table saw? If not that would be the first tool i’d buy.

-- Petey

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MPython

91 posts in 113 days


#21 posted 12-14-2018 02:12 PM

Don’t know why this wants to post twice. Sorry.

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waho6o9

8594 posts in 2878 days


#22 posted 12-14-2018 02:15 PM

You’re wise to purchase quality, go for it!

View jdmaher's profile

jdmaher

446 posts in 2880 days


#23 posted 12-14-2018 02:43 PM

Don’t have a bandsaw. Always wanted one, but never got around to it. 30 years into this hobby, I still would only use one maybe two or three times a year (and then I just use a jigsaw).

Tablesaw is almost daily.

I STILL want a bandsaw. If I had it, I’d probably find many more uses for it. But, realistically, I doubt that I’d ever really have to resaw, and my tendency is to think I’d probably most use a fairly small one. So, two or three times a year I spend a few hours trying to find a moderately-sized, sturdy, reliable-forever band saw I’m willing to spend the money on. But, as I said, 30 years into woodworking and no bandsaw yet.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View Steve's profile

Steve

1107 posts in 883 days


#24 posted 12-14-2018 03:26 PM



You should get two bandsaws a small one and a big one. 14 inch and a 20 inch or bigger.
I use my bandsaws more then my table saw.
Bandsaws open up a whole new area of woodworking

- Aj2

I agree with this. I have a 14” Rikon set up for resawing and also found a great deal on a smaller 14” PM that I use for regular work.

I can also use the Rikon to rip lumber as well. Comes in very hand since my TS is currently serving as my workbench. lol

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#25 posted 12-14-2018 03:31 PM


Do you have a table saw? If not that would be the first tool i d buy.

- Peteybadboy

Yes, sorry forgot to mention that, I have a bosch 4100 jobsite saw with the gravity rise…It’s not my dream saw by any means, but it’s served me well over the years and i put a Forrest blade on it a couple years back which really changed how it performed. I am building a cross cut sled for it as I type. Like i said not my dream saw, but I figure i will get one large tool a year or every other year. No need to replace a tool I have now is the way i look at it. Band saw is just a blatant gap in my cutting tools, don’t have anything that can do what it does. Jigsaw doesn’t count to me..And quite honestly aside from all it’s shortcomings the 4100 is a damn accurate little saw.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8594 posts in 2878 days


#26 posted 12-14-2018 03:38 PM

My 4100 and track saw makes for a great combo. Add a Bandsaw to the mix and you can

make a lot of good items.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2237 posts in 3245 days


#27 posted 12-14-2018 04:42 PM

I started in woodworking around 65, so I’ve been at it a bit longer than thirty years. That said, I’ve had at least five, probably six bandsaws. Until I got a real one, about ten years ago, I didn’t realize how many times it could do what I’d been doing on a table saw and do it more conveniently.

Then there is the ability to do things you can’t do with a table saw or even a handheld saber saw (I have a Bosch and even with the long Festool blades, it can’t compete with many of the things my bandsaw does.

Not having one is like not having a nail gun or an cordless drill and driver. You “don’t need one,” until after you’ve used it a LITTLE while.

Key is, buy a good one. Contrary to what some would say, it doesn’t have to be an eight hundred pound beast with eighty inch wheels. Having listened to a couple owners, a 14Grizzly might fit the bill. For me, it’s a 14”PM with a riser and a Rikon. The latter is dedicated to re-saw and quick rip cuts of small pieces.

I thought I’d only do a little re-saw, but free wood is everywhere around here. Too, splitting boards to face cabinets made it easy to stiffen up old farm house cabinets with 3/8 maple and oak.

One of my favorite after-market buys for the bandsaw, and riser blocks aside, was the Carter Stabilizer blade support. Quick and easy to set, it produces great cuts and tightens the radius cuts you can do with 1/8” to 1/4” blades.


Don t have a bandsaw. Always wanted one, but never got around to it. 30 years into this hobby, I still would only use one maybe two or three times a year (and then I just use a jigsaw).

Tablesaw is almost daily.

I STILL want a bandsaw. If I had it, I d probably find many more uses for it. But, realistically, I doubt that I d ever really have to resaw, and my tendency is to think I d probably most use a fairly small one. So, two or three times a year I spend a few hours trying to find a moderately-sized, sturdy, reliable-forever band saw I m willing to spend the money on. But, as I said, 30 years into woodworking and no bandsaw yet.

- jdmaher


View Phil32's profile

Phil32

461 posts in 204 days


#28 posted 12-14-2018 04:47 PM

Sawneck – Most of these comments focus on brand names, sizes, etc. What do these advisors produce with their bandsaws? Take a look at their projects to see how they are being used.

I have a 12” Craftsman that I have had more than sixty years. I use it mostly for roughing out carving projects.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2237 posts in 3245 days


#29 posted 12-14-2018 04:51 PM

Things you can do with crap (e.g., 4×4’s and 4×6’s, etc.) and other wood, IF you have a bandsaw:

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2062 posts in 2099 days


#30 posted 12-14-2018 05:05 PM

I use my 20 inch bandsaw for breaking down large rough planks. Since I like to build a piece from the same tree I get large slabs. Sometimes they are very dirty or warped so a good sized bandsaw will cut away the nasty stuff that eats up jointer blades.
I also use my 20 for fine work with a good sharp blade. Curved laminations is very rewarding work. I can’t show my current work because it’s going to be displayed at a woodworking competition. Need to keep the mystic:)
Here’s some of my past work I can show off.

-- Aj

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sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#31 posted 12-15-2018 12:48 AM



My 4100 and track saw makes for a great combo. Add a Bandsaw to the mix and you can

make a lot of good items.

- waho6o9

It really does make for a good combo..i have the TS55 with the mft and find that serves as a solid crosscut sled and the track saw is just super versatile. for now the 4100 will continue to be a fixture in my shop..i will get a sawstop when i deserve it..likely after many projects and mistakes that cause me to use very bad language.

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sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#32 posted 12-15-2018 12:49 AM

I appreciate all the input from all of you, this has been helpful to get the validation from veterans. this is a great site.

I picked up the saw today with the stand…won’t open until Christmas so feel free to keep the advice coming!

I do want to know which blade is the most universal everyday blade for this thing…Laguna told me to get a 1/2 inch 6TPI for it. seems like good advice but wanted to bounce it off the experts. I did pick up their 3/4 inch resaw blade (non resaw king), I figure I will use that before I drop $150 on a RS king.

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sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#33 posted 12-15-2018 01:10 AM


Do not pass go! Grab the 1412.

At work so no time for a long post but here s my review. and my short and sweet video.

- Andybb

I should ask you this question since you own the saw…What blade do you use on this thing for everyday use?

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2237 posts in 3245 days


#34 posted 12-15-2018 01:18 AM

There, really, is no universal blade. If you have your re-saw blades on, you’ll need the scrolling blade. If you have the scrolling blade, you’ll need to rip some pieces of plastic, wood or what have you.

In short, there is a reason why many of us have two bandsaws [in addition to our table saws, track saws and so on].

For me, it’s and all or nothing thing – I run the biggest re-saw blade I can, or I drop down to 3/16” or even a 1/8” [and suffer it when I have to make a wide board a narrow one].

View sawneck's profile

sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#35 posted 12-15-2018 05:15 AM



I use my 20 inch bandsaw for breaking down large rough planks. Since I like to build a piece from the same tree I get large slabs. Sometimes they are very dirty or warped so a good sized bandsaw will cut away the nasty stuff that eats up jointer blades.
I also use my 20 for fine work with a good sharp blade. Curved laminations is very rewarding work. I can’t show my current work because it’s going to be displayed at a woodworking competition. Need to keep the mystic:)
Here’s some of my past work I can show off.

- Aj2

beautiful work!

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3622 days


#36 posted 12-15-2018 05:49 AM


I do want to know which blade is the most universal everyday blade for this thing…Laguna told me to get a 1/2 inch 6TPI for it. seems like good advice but wanted to bounce it off the experts. I did pick up their 3/4 inch resaw blade (non resaw king), I figure I will use that before I drop $150 on a RS king.

- sawneck

While I loathe the idea of a general purpose bandsaw blade (I use 8 or so on a regular basis) arguably the “best” GP blade for a bandsaw is a 1/4” 6tpi blade.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1324 posts in 1117 days


#37 posted 12-15-2018 04:02 PM

I am another one of those guys who advises buying a table saw first. That is because I have both but use the table saw at least 20 times as often as the band saws. Actually, I have 2 band saws. I use one for curve cutting and another for resawing because I hate changing blades.

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stefang

16580 posts in 3635 days


#38 posted 12-15-2018 04:40 PM

I say go for it. A bandsaw can do more different types of cuts than any other tool in the shop can do.
It can do:
  1. straight rip cuts
  2. crosscuts
  3. circles and curves using a variety of blade widths (the larger the saw the wider the range of radiuses it can cut)
  4. Miter cuts and compound miter cuts
  5. re-saw wide boards (determined by max height cut)
  6. cut thin veneer from boards
  7. Rough our turning blanks

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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TheFridge

10844 posts in 1787 days


#39 posted 12-15-2018 04:45 PM



I am another one of those guys who advises buying a table saw first. That is because I have both but use the table saw at least 20 times as often as the band saws. Actually, I have 2 band saws. I use one for curve cutting and another for resawing because I hate changing blades.

- ArtMann

Unless it’s alder. Then you need a photon torch.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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ArtMann

1324 posts in 1117 days


#40 posted 12-15-2018 07:51 PM

I avoid Alder for that very reason.

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sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#41 posted 12-15-2018 09:39 PM



I am another one of those guys who advises buying a table saw first. That is because I have both but use the table saw at least 20 times as often as the band saws. Actually, I have 2 band saws. I use one for curve cutting and another for resawing because I hate changing blades.

- ArtMann

thanks I own a table saw already.

View Phil Soper's profile

Phil Soper

25 posts in 102 days


#42 posted 12-15-2018 09:44 PM

Yes Once you start to use a bandsaw you will realize just how great they are. I started with a 14” Rikon with a carbide tipped Lenox blade – great saw for general work but not for resaw. Next I bought a Hammer 17”, installed a Laguna Resaw King and I use it almost everyday to resaw. Then I bought a 10” Rikon, with a Carter blade stabilizer and an 1/8 blade, it is great for very tight curves

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WoodenDreams

507 posts in 212 days


#43 posted 12-15-2018 09:56 PM

Carpenters generally don’t have the need for a bandsaw, but as a woodworker. If you have room for the Bandsaw, It’s worth it in the long run. With a shop in the basement, I would strongly advice a “air filtration system” to catch the wading or floating dust. Similar to the Wen system, about $130.

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sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#44 posted 12-15-2018 10:11 PM



Carpenters generally don t have the need for a bandsaw, but as a woodworker. If you have room for the Bandsaw, It s worth it in the long run. With a shop in the basement, I would strongly advice a “air filtration system” to catch the wading or floating dust. Similar to the Wen system, about $130.

- WoodenDreams

yes, which is likely why i never saw the need for one..But i am officially moving into more woodworking type projects, but being cautious i don’t invest in tools I may not need. I know a band saw is super versatile and woodworker requirement, i just needed to hear it from some actual woodworkers…

and yes that exact unit is on my list of tools to buy, i am getting there. I do have alot of festool and two of their vacs one with the boom arm so i have a decent handle on dust collection for the moment. But i agree with you

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Kelly

2237 posts in 3245 days


#45 posted 12-15-2018 11:18 PM

As to carpenters not needing bandsaws, that depends. For example, finish carpenter contractors can use the heck out of them. Consider the roof support corbel I posted above. You’d pay out the nose for one with the joints that one has, and it was all done on a little. 14” bandsaw.

Before I retired, I was a carpenter-woodworker and got a lot of jobs the other boys couldn’t because I had an actual wood shop and not just a few carpentry tools (e.g., circular saw, nailers, compressor, a hammers, a yellow cordless drill and driver, tapes, framing square, etc.).

The more I could do, the more jobs I got. It’s a bit like that with a bandsaw.

Until you have a good one to go to any time you want, you cannot appreciate how valuable they are.

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NoSpace

153 posts in 1541 days


#46 posted 12-16-2018 01:09 AM

What do you want to make? You didn’t mention what your building goals are.

We can reduce this to a single question:

Do you plan to buy rough-cut lumber from a lumber yard?

If the answer is yes, then you need a bandsaw. I got a 10” first, when i realized the main point was to dimension hardwood stock, I upgraded to the 1412 you have. 1/2” RK or the Lenox Trimaster (what i have) will save a lot of frustration and money.

With a powerful table saw you could get away with everything save resawing. But bear in mind the efficiency of any cutting operation isn’t comparable. Ripping 1” thick anything harder than walnut on my jobsite dewalt with a great blade is a little scary, really loud, and will probably burn. But ripping 2” + of the same stock on the little 10” is like cutting hot butter. it’s just you have to have a plan for cleaning up edges.

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Captspaulding

18 posts in 111 days


#47 posted 12-16-2018 02:01 AM

Talk about irony.

So about seven years ago I said the same thing. Then at a garage sale I found a 10” craftsman. Thinking I would never use it, but for $60, i didn’t think i could pass it up.

This morning I just set up my new steel Jet JWBS 14sfx. And all I can say, is I can’t believe what I was missing. It took me most of the morning to setup, tune and square. I also replaces the blade with a 3/4 blade. I’m not into the curves but the resaw capability is incredible.

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Kelly

2237 posts in 3245 days


#48 posted 12-16-2018 02:23 AM

I just got in from the shop, where I was turning small pieces of wood into even smaller pieces. Before the bandsaw, sizing the wood I use for items in the images would have been a hassle or even dangerous (short pieces on a large cabinet saw is a recipe for excitement). Pieces that, for bandsaw (BS?) would have been someone’s kindling are, now, becoming these.


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sawneck

48 posts in 3455 days


#49 posted 12-16-2018 03:05 AM


What do you want to make? You didn t mention what your building goals are.

We can reduce this to a single question:

Do you plan to buy rough-cut lumber from a lumber yard?

If the answer is yes, then you need a bandsaw. I got a 10” first, when i realized the main point was to dimension hardwood stock, I upgraded to the 1412 you have. 1/2” RK or the Lenox Trimaster (what i have) will save a lot of frustration and money.

With a powerful table saw you could get away with everything save resawing. But bear in mind the efficiency of any cutting operation isn t comparable. Ripping 1” thick anything harder than walnut on my jobsite dewalt with a great blade is a little scary, really loud, and will probably burn. But ripping 2” + of the same stock on the little 10” is like cutting hot butter. it s just you have to have a plan for cleaning up edges.

- NoSpace

Good question and points..My first official project will be a roubo bench, but i will likely make some bandsaw boxes for my kids first. The overall plan is to have all the necessary capabilities to resaw rough stock so yes, I will be buying rough stock and have a good source for live edge lumber too. Things I see myself using the 1412 for are cutting tenons, shaping table legs or anything else I need to shape, cutting metal, scrolling where needed.

My plan to 4 square work pieces is to use a combination of the band saw, thickness planer and some hand tools, table saw if needed. i’d like to avoid getting a power jointer right away, i want to try my hand at some hand tools first and use my thickness planer to do the rest. Hand tools will be the thing I set my sights on after I get the band saw up and running and a drill press. Then i feel like I will have an actual shop to woodwork in with an end to end workflow.

I bought the 3/4 in resaw blade, not the RS King, i am holding off on that thing until I see how I do with a non carbie resaw blade first. Need to have something to aspire to since I came roaring out of the gate with the 1412. : )

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TheFridge

10844 posts in 1787 days


#50 posted 12-16-2018 05:36 AM

Don’t get me wrong. It’ll cut metal. Bits of it will stick to the tires and tear it up eventually. I use a 1/4” wood blade to scroll and cut brass and aluminum with. Better than a portaband.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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