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View pontic's profile

Sizing router planing sled.

by pontic
posted 12-13-2018 03:49 PM


6 replies so far

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

196 posts in 1774 days


#1 posted 12-13-2018 05:27 PM

The wider the boards the longer the span from side to side so the rigidity of the arms that guide your router becomes an issue. More HP usually translates into heavier routers and heavier routers midspan can induce minor flexion so I’d be considering this. Your 960 will work fine as long as you don’t try to take too deep or too large a “bite” with each pass.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

View Andre's profile

Andre

2836 posts in 2348 days


#2 posted 12-13-2018 05:31 PM

I have 2 of them, big one used when built my workbench, I believe about 36”long for large router
and I have a smaller one about 24” for a cordless router.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1145 days


#3 posted 12-13-2018 06:17 PM


The wider the boards the longer the span from side to side so the rigidity of the arms that guide your router becomes an issue. More HP usually translates into heavier routers and heavier routers midspan can induce minor flexion so I d be considering this. Your 960 will work fine as long as you don t try to take too deep or too large a “bite” with each pass.

- OnhillWW

+1 100%

I use my Bosch 1617 and my PC in the sleds I’ve built. Used a 1.5” blade too. No problem with each. As OnhillWW said make sure there is no flex. Either use a very stout table or the floor to sit the rails on. Also make sure there is no flex in the sled. Definitely something you want to “over build”. Use hardwood or steel for the rails. A 2×4 will flex as even a few mm’s will have a negative effect. Keep a hone handy to sharpen the blade and that the stock is shimmed well from the bottom and take small bites as you plane. The router will rise and fall as it crosses the wood if it’s not shimmed well or if you take too big of a bite.

I did a few a couple of years ago. What I learned is that for large slabs it was easier to pay the local hardwood dealer $100 to plane and sand it in a great big industrial machine.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2051 posts in 704 days


#4 posted 12-13-2018 06:33 PM

as for the cross rails that hold the router base,
a very strong, rigid and lightweight option is
the steel bed frame side rails . . . . maybe $10.00 at Goodwill.

[there are dozens and dozens of good suggestions on the slet setup].

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View pontic's profile

pontic

697 posts in 1150 days


#5 posted 12-13-2018 08:33 PM

Never thought of bed rails but that sounds like a great idea.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

8872 posts in 3384 days


#6 posted 12-14-2018 04:45 AM

Good information from people in the know. Planning something similar, and I’m going to take the advice, LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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