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View groygroy's profile

Cutting 3 inch PVC

by groygroy
posted 12-07-2018 10:58 PM


23 replies so far

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1343 posts in 1448 days


#1 posted 12-07-2018 11:15 PM

See post #42 in this thread.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View groygroy's profile

groygroy

18 posts in 1014 days


#2 posted 12-07-2018 11:21 PM



See post #42 in this thread.

- Ripper70

Thanks, that’s a really cool idea! I hate those black marks so much I’m about ready to replace all the black pipe in my clamps with galvanized. But, that’s not really my question. Trying to figure out if cutting a lot of PVC pipe is going to wear down my sawblades.

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1182 posts in 2101 days


#3 posted 12-07-2018 11:26 PM

I use a cheap 80T thin kerf carbide. The blade will get gunked up from melted PVC so I only use the blade for PVC cutting.

View BFamous's profile

BFamous

322 posts in 660 days


#4 posted 12-07-2018 11:27 PM

Your blade should be fine for cutting pvc. It should have no more wear than cutting most woods. Though as it heats up from repeated use, it could start melting the pvc, creating build up on the blade

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1343 posts in 1448 days


#5 posted 12-07-2018 11:56 PM

I agree that the blade should be fine. The takeaway from the post I linked to is that safety is the major concern. I can see how cutting a plastic tube could result in the occasional catch, resulting in a flying, cylindrical projectile. Wear eye protection and stand to one side, just to be sure.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Heyoka's profile

Heyoka

26 posts in 392 days


#6 posted 12-08-2018 12:59 AM

I cut PVC and ABS on the miter saw often with no observed any problems….

-- Heyoka

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2026 days


#7 posted 12-08-2018 01:28 AM

It’ll be fine

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

248 posts in 1073 days


#8 posted 12-08-2018 01:46 AM

If the PVC is heavy you can use any woodworking blade to cut it. (finer is better though)
If you are cutting something thin, Use one of the old steel blades. (not carbide) put the blade on backwards so the teeth are not cutting. It will buzz right through no problem.

It’s an old carpenter trick for cutting vinyl siding

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

View groygroy's profile

groygroy

18 posts in 1014 days


#9 posted 12-08-2018 02:48 AM


I agree that the blade should be fine. The takeaway from the post I linked to is that safety is the major concern. I can see how cutting a plastic tube could result in the occasional catch, resulting in a flying, cylindrical projectile. Wear eye protection and stand to one side, just to be sure.

- Ripper70

That’s a very good point. Thanks for mentioning it. I have a substantial respect for cutting anything not square on a chop saw.

My plan is to set up 4 tubes side by side for crosscut, bound with 1×8x3/4 inch plywood strips. I set a strip between every other cut, with a stop block that also holds from the top on the out feed side. Will be a big cut, but the goal is to not cut anything round.

May have some melting problems with such a long cut. I didn’t think of that. Gonna give it a try tomorrow. If I’m successful I’ll post a pic and some notes. If not, I’m gonna pretend this never happened… hah!

View groygroy's profile

groygroy

18 posts in 1014 days


#10 posted 12-08-2018 02:52 AM



If the PVC is heavy you can use any woodworking blade to cut it. (finer is better though)
If you are cutting something thin, Use one of the old steel blades. (not carbide) put the blade on backwards so the teeth are not cutting. It will buzz right through no problem.

It s an old carpenter trick for cutting vinyl siding

- EricTwice

Nice suggestion. I’m cutting 3 inch pipes, so they should be heavy enough for the wood blade I think? Also not super worried about chipping. This does not need to look nice. Just want to do it safe and not damage a $150 blade. Thanks for the advice!

View rance's profile

rance

4271 posts in 3700 days


#11 posted 12-08-2018 03:16 AM

If you use your tools, they will eventually get dull. Don’t cut pvc, don’t cut wood, don’t cut copper pipe, maybe quit woodworking and send me your tools. TIC :)

Seriously, I cut wood, pvc, and copper pipe on the saw. I have see no degradation of any kind with non-wood.

Turning a blade around backwards is for cutting sheet metal, NOT pvc. You do that with pvc and you will have many problems, not to mention the melting instead of cutting. More teeth is better because of the thin walls of the pvc compared to a solid stick of wood. Go a little slower than with wood, but not too slow to begin melting it. You’ll quickly get the hang of it after 3-4 cuts.

I would cut one at a time, not the 4 at a time you suggest. You want to be able to grasp the 1 tube securely to keep it from rotating. I would be suspect of wrapping them between plywood and expecting that to securely hold ALL of them equally.

You will likely be using a stop block. Don’t leave it in place while making the cut or the pvc will become jammed between that and the blade when the cut is complete. I doubt that extreme precision is required so just mark a line on the saw and let that suffice for your repeatability.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View RDan's profile

RDan

116 posts in 2864 days


#12 posted 12-08-2018 03:31 AM

I had this issue a while back. Started using my Sawsall with a metal cutting blade, used a wood miter box with a slot to keep it inline. You still need to deburr it some. Dan

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5974 posts in 2949 days


#13 posted 12-08-2018 04:36 AM

I cut PVC all the time with miter saw. Not a cheap blade but not a $200 version either. Never a problem and cuts wood, all kinds hard and soft well. Go slow, wear glasses and stand to the side as best is possible.

Recently used miter saw to cut all these pieces:

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1948 posts in 2034 days


#14 posted 12-08-2018 10:21 AM

I’ve cut up to 2.5 inch PVC on job site with a ratcheting knife cutter like this. Have a smaller one for pipe up to 1 1/4 inch too. Using something like that for 80 repetitive cuts on smaller pieces would be PIA.

Have used miter saw many times, works OK. Any blade works. But when making a massive number of cuts might buy a dedicated blade if care about cut finish quality? Want to use alternating TCG grind saw blade to reduce melting. Blades labeled non-ferrous metal cutting with TCG grind are $50 at HD. Forest blade will set you back $200+.
Suggest using full thickness blade for larger diameter pipe. Thin kerf blade has more flex, and since the pipe is open in middle; if you cut too fast in your repetitive boredom, it can sometimes cut a wavy edge if that matters for you. DAMHIK

For cutting short pieces of PVC, like to use band saw when piece fits inside saw throat. Use any 3-4 TPI blade and it cuts as fast as you feed it with zero melting. Band saw will not ‘catch’ a small piece of pipe & throw it 20 feet like miter saw. :)

One last note with cutting plastic pipe. Static electricity will have plastic scarf stuck to everything. So unless you want 10 ft circle around your saw filled with white plastic dust with bad tendency towards static cling, use a dust collection system.

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View EricTwice's profile

EricTwice

248 posts in 1073 days


#15 posted 12-08-2018 12:20 PM


Turning a blade around backwards is for cutting sheet metal, NOT pvc.

- rance

I have used it extensively for thin plastic. (PVC, Vinyl, and many other thin sheet plastics) I have never heard of it being used for sheet metal. I usually stick them on a back up board. I will give it a go and see if I like it…thanks

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5802 posts in 3033 days


#16 posted 12-08-2018 12:20 PM

For the smoothest cut, you might consider using a negative hook blade. We have a huge plastics supplier nearby, and that’s what they use to cut all sorts of plastic material…including PVC pipe. Someone above mentioned it, the wear on your blade will be no worse than cutting wood…but do watch for overheating.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1380 posts in 2492 days


#17 posted 12-08-2018 01:22 PM

See post #42 in this thread.

- Ripper70

Thanks, that s a really cool idea! I hate those black marks so much I m about ready to replace all the black pipe in my clamps with galvanized. But, that s not really my question. Trying to figure out if cutting a lot of PVC pipe is going to wear down my sawblades.

- groygroy

Galvanized pipe does not work well with pipe clamps. The moveable jaw tends to slide rather than bite in and stay put. Your results may vary.

View groygroy's profile

groygroy

18 posts in 1014 days


#18 posted 12-08-2018 03:13 PM



For cutting short pieces of PVC, like to use band saw when piece fits inside saw throat. Use any 3-4 TPI blade and it cuts as fast as you feed it with zero melting. Band saw will not catch a small piece of pipe & throw it 20 feet like miter saw. :)

This is a good idea. I went away from the bandsaw cause I wasn’t sure about blade damage. If that’s not a worry, maybe I’ll just use it.

View groygroy's profile

groygroy

18 posts in 1014 days


#19 posted 12-08-2018 03:14 PM



Galvanized pipe does not work well with pipe clamps. The moveable jaw tends to slide rather than bite in and stay put. Your results may vary.

- Kazooman

Good to know. Thanks!

View Gentile's profile

Gentile

356 posts in 2358 days


#20 posted 12-09-2018 04:27 PM

I inherited my Dads collection of Sears galvanized pipe clamps. They do slip a bit, a tap on the lever helps set them.
I’d replace the pipe if black pipe wasn’t so expensive..

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

View MikeDilday's profile

MikeDilday

259 posts in 999 days


#21 posted 12-09-2018 11:01 PM

I’ve cut PVC on a miter saw and never had any issues.

-- Michael Dilday, Suffolk, Va.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6640 posts in 2805 days


#22 posted 12-10-2018 12:45 AM

groygroy, don’t swap out your black pipe for galvanized. That’s all I’ve got and I finding that some of the pipe clamps are slipping as they try to dig into that galvanized coating. I can’t get them to give me a tight set.

View groygroy's profile

groygroy

18 posts in 1014 days


#23 posted 12-10-2018 01:39 AM



groygroy, don t swap out your black pipe for galvanized. That s all I ve got and I finding that some of the pipe clamps are slipping as they try to dig into that galvanized coating. I can t get them to give me a tight set.

- BurlyBob

Thanks for the heads up. I guess i’ll have to try the PVC truck mentioned before. I’ve been using tape to stop the black marks and it’s such a hassle.

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