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View dataz722's profile

Am I missing anything for getting started

by dataz722
posted 12-06-2018 10:07 PM


27 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117745 posts in 4113 days


#1 posted 12-06-2018 10:16 PM

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

612 posts in 738 days


#2 posted 12-06-2018 11:00 PM

LOL, purchase my first lathe and everything that goes with it, hehehehe, no crazier statement made, when one turns, there seems to be no end to what one will want to make it easier, faster, simpler, not knocking you, just saying for me it seems there is always that “one’ thing maybe i need, of course it could just be Me.

best of luck, nothing like throwing dust from a lathe

Rj in az

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#3 posted 12-06-2018 11:18 PM


https://www.amazon.com/PSI-Woodworking-LCHSS8-Chisel-8-Piece/dp/B000KI8CTS/ref=zg_bs_552516_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=BVMDH9XYMR0Y6JB7ZKSN

- a1Jim

Would those be good to start with if I do intend to still move onto bowls? I’ve seen people say that the shorter ones are quickly replaced with longer ones. Is there any advantage to having short ones as well?

And yes, I am aware of all the innuendos there! Maybe they were intentional, maybe not…


LOL, purchase my first lathe and everything that goes with it, hehehehe, no crazier statement made, when one turns, there seems to be no end to what one will want to make it easier, faster, simpler, not knocking you, just saying for me it seems there is always that “one thing maybe i need, of course it could just be Me.

best of luck, nothing like throwing dust from a lathe

Rj in az

- Knockonit

Yeah, guess I should have worded that differently. Between woodworking and photography I know the feeling of always NEEDING something else. Its a curse I tell ya!

View Andre's profile

Andre

2828 posts in 2342 days


#4 posted 12-06-2018 11:31 PM

Wood, lots of Wood and oh ya, pen kits, lots pen kits, and of course the matching bushings for the different styles of pens and and and.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5695 posts in 4199 days


#5 posted 12-06-2018 11:45 PM

Would those be good to start with if I do intend to still move onto bowls?

No … this set is suitable for spindle work. You need a bowl gouge to turn bowls.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#6 posted 12-06-2018 11:47 PM



Wood, lots of Wood and oh ya, pen kits, lots pen kits, and of course the matching bushings for the different styles of pens and and and.

- Andre

Yeah, I left those off the list. I will probably get a few different starter kits for different styles from PSI that come with the bits and bushings.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2756 posts in 2671 days


#7 posted 12-07-2018 11:25 AM

Suggest hanging out here and reading free thread some threads require you sign up before seeing. http://www.penturners.org/forum/

If live close enough might make a visit to retail store versus order online or from catalog. PSI also offers a free DVD on pen turning. Depending upon your turning skills only need maybe three tools: roughing gouge, skew, and parting tool. YOU CAN BUY INDIVIDUALLY VERSUS TOOL SET! Same goes for bowl other spindle gouges too. PSI’s BB tools inexpensive and okay for starting out.

https://www.pennstateind.com/store/corporate_information.html

Universal barrel trimming set:
https://www.pennstateind.com/store/PKTRIMKIT.html

I never bought a pen press didn’t need one. Used C and furniture clamps or just bench vise for assembly.

Sounds like already know something about kit bushings, never used non-stick bushings, just check to make sure compatible with kit want to turn. A good drill index set and drill size chart can keep you from buying new drill bits for every pen kit.

https://www.imperialsupplies.com/pdf/I_DrillSizeDecimalEquivalent&TapDrillChart.pdf

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/woodriver-25-piece-metric-brad-point-drill-bit-index-set

Digital calipers for measuring kit components & drill bits.

https://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?dir=asc&order=EAScore%2Cf%2CEAFeatured+Weight%2Cf%2CSale+Rank%2Cf&q=digital+caliper

When want to move up to better tools might look at:

www.packardwoodworks.com

www.woodturnserscatalog.com

Lot of good vendors selling tools but these two good starting point because offer discount if buy more than one turning tools at a time. As you get more experience will find other vendors that offer sales on tool too.

-- Bill

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2437 posts in 2525 days


#8 posted 12-07-2018 04:42 PM

o 3 spindle gouges 1/4, 3/8, 1/2
o 1/2 & 1” rectangle skews
o 2-3 scrapers you can grind to desired forms
o Barracuda2 chuck and jaw sets

Many more items later

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2437 posts in 2525 days


#9 posted 12-07-2018 06:57 PM

Super center drive centers from psi

Bowl turning 3/8 & 5/8 bowl gouges (shaft dia not flute width).

Research negative rake scrapers – grind your own from any scraper

Power sanding – 3/8” 90 deg vs drill with pads and discs I like http://vinceswoodnwonders.com – more for bowls vs spindle turning

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1923 days


#10 posted 12-07-2018 07:18 PM


Would those be good to start with if I do intend to still move onto bowls?

No … this set is suitable for spindle work. You need a bowl gouge to turn bowls.

- TheDane

There is a 1/2” bowl gouge included in that set. This is a good quaility starter set. It has more scrapers than needed but those are handy for reshaping for other uses. I would add a thinner parting tool and a couple of smaller spindle gouges. Carbide tools can be a quick jump start for beginners and are good for roughing of bowls with less risk of scary catches. Other good starter sets are branded as Hercules and Benjamin’s Best.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

320 posts in 1067 days


#11 posted 12-07-2018 07:27 PM

Look into getting a chuck. I have a Hurricane HTC100 and am happy with it. Nova and Barracuda are similar price range. Opens a world of mounting options.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

11308 posts in 1674 days


#12 posted 12-07-2018 07:28 PM

LJ Dave Kelley sells carbide tools. I own a set and recommend them to new and advanced turners alike. I’m not of the mindset that you can do everything with carbide but they sure are nice to have and easy to use!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#13 posted 12-07-2018 07:28 PM

I do want to get a chuck, just don’t know if I am going to have the budget for one right off the bat. I also haven’t really researched them much at all. Is there anything in particular to look for or avoid?

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

687 posts in 439 days


#14 posted 12-07-2018 07:35 PM

I would argue that the more you buy to do one form of woodturning, the more you will feel compelled to do only that. Keep your options open. Get only what you need for the initial projects, then let your own ambitions define what comes next.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2756 posts in 2671 days


#15 posted 12-07-2018 08:58 PM

Agree with Phil, if stay with your spindle turning mentioned above will learn about stance, grip, tool control, re-sharpening tools and see results quickly.

Will also give you time look over lathe chucks. Depending upon access to wood to turn may decide need a bigger lathe for bowl turning. Yes, that Rikon will let you turn decent bowls but who knows!

-- Bill

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#16 posted 12-13-2018 04:32 PM

Ok, i’ve added a handful of things to my list and am about to order everything. Originally I was going to get the Nova G3 reversible chuck and add pen jaws to it so I could just drill the blanks on the lathe
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0074HJ1V6/ref=ox_sc_act_title_4?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KTJN2RU/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=A32Z8OYXJ6YY95&psc=1
but as I was adding everything to my cart I saw their 30th anniversary set which comes with pin jaws, another set of jaws and a case. It would only be $2 more than buying the two separate. Is there any reason the pin jaws wouldn’t work for drilling the blanks?

https://www.rockler.com/nova-30th-anniversary-g3-reversible-chuck-bundle-with-3-jaw-sets-and-case

Or is there another chuck I should be considering altogether?

Thanks

And just for reference what was added to my list is

abranet
PSI’s 8 piece tool set https://www.pennstateind.com/store/LCHSS8.html
PSI 3/8” spindle gouge
Nova g3 reversible chuck
Pen blank jaws
Drill chuck
Shellawax
Face shield
PSI magnetic dust collection https://www.pennstateind.com/store/DLHOODC2.html

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#17 posted 12-13-2018 04:36 PM

edit- added to post above and don’t see an option to delete this post

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1923 days


#18 posted 12-13-2018 05:03 PM

That G3 anniversary set is a good deal. I haven’t delved into pen making but I’ve drilled tool handles on the lathe using my pin jaws (from a different chuck) and it works fine. I would hold off on buying the pen jaws and see if the the G3 pin jaws are small enough to grab the pen blanks (I don’t have them so I am unsure how small they are).

And BTW, if you register for pennstateind.com’s email list, they usually (used to?) give send a 15% coupon off your first purchase and regularly email similar coupons and sales as well.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#19 posted 12-13-2018 05:06 PM

Thanks! That’s what I was thinking, but didn’t know if I was missing something in my logic. Essentially getting another set of jaws and the case for free.

And it looks like they do 10% now, which I did use.

View Dustin's profile (online now)

Dustin

700 posts in 1276 days


#20 posted 12-13-2018 05:45 PM

I would throw in my 2 cents that if you already have a slow speed grinder and wolverine jig, go with HSS. I have a couple of self-made carbide tools, but I find myself very rarely using them. I prefer the learning curve and tactile feedback of HSS tools, personally.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2437 posts in 2525 days


#21 posted 12-14-2018 01:24 PM

Good 1st list. I prefer serrated jaws to dovetail, but that’s another discussion. For your 2nd list, which it wont take too long to need, if you decide to do 5-6” and up bowls platters vases go with power sanding. Also helpful for smoother flatter spindle turning, but not for ornate spindles with tight curves. And a 5/8” bowl gouge.

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

64 posts in 2089 days


#22 posted 12-14-2018 04:18 PM

Buy some horseshoe nails, hardware stores sell them in my town. get a tree triming, drill as necessary, pound nail in. sharpen other end. T hat becomes your first t.ool. Another piece of tree trimming mounted in the chuck and you are kinda one your way. Next exersize, find a round chair leg, give it a go. Cheap and on your way.

Know you will kinda know what you need to buy. Kents in Tucson doesn’t matter if tool is sharp or not
buy it or them Learning to sharrpen Then spend money as you want or need..
Most of my pens are made from scrap legs from Goodwill or tree trimmings , they are well seasoned and usually somewhat round.

Learning to sharpen is the main thing in lathe work, to go. don’t buy carbide they don’t sharpen easily and need special stones. High speed steel is the way

Have fun, lathe work is my favorite thing in woodworking.

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

684 posts in 1837 days


#23 posted 12-14-2018 05:32 PM

The G3 is a nice chuck and the price for the set is very good.
I guess the PEN jaws may be nice if you turn lots of pens … rather limited IMHO.
The PIN jaws (in the set) allows to to hold small round items, pen blanks (with the corners between the jaws), has a dovetail for 1” recesses (such as tea lights, etc), and of course the pin use which I use most often. To mount most anything just drill a 1” hole 1” deep, insert the jaws and expand.

Add.. you may want to look at dust mask (I didn’t see them above). The following are N95 but they also make a N100. They are rated for 160 hours use but I normally trash mine about 40 hours or so … that is still only about 5 cents per sanding session. A box should last for several years.
https://www.amazon.com/3M-8511HB1-C-PS-Sanding-Fiberglass-Respirator/dp/B002VMCHPG/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1544808869&sr=8-10&keywords=3m+dust+masks+disposable

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#24 posted 12-14-2018 05:54 PM

That’s what I was thinking about the pin jaws. I do plan on doing a lot of pens (hopefully selling them once I get good), but if there are no problems using the pins for that, they are more versatile, and cheaper (considering what else comes with the set for the same price) I don’t see how I can go wrong. I think I am going to order it. Everything else has been ordered and just waiting for Woodcraft to call and say the lathe is in.

I didn’t include a dust mask because I use a respirator and have both plain particulate filters and chemical filters that I swap in and out of it. I may still get those masks though because they are probably a hell of a lot more comfortable than the respirator especially since I use ear muffs as ear pro. I didn’t know there were disposable masks rated for that kind of filtration cheaply available.

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

502 posts in 1614 days


#25 posted 12-15-2018 10:03 PM



I think I am about to purchase my first lathe and everything that goes with it. I just want some opinions if I might be overlooking something or if I should go with something different for anything as I would like to order everything at once. I plan to start out doing spindle stuff (pens, seam rippers, gift things, pepper mills etc) but would eventually like to try bowls. I have not decided if I want to go with carbide or hss tools and haven t really looked into chucks too much yet. Also, I already have a slow speed grinder and wolverine jig.

Rikon Model 70-1218VS Lathe
Mandrel saver kit from PSI
Whiteside barrel trimmer set
Micromesh
sandpaper
nonstick bushings
varigrind

I really feel like I am missing something there….

Thanks

- dataz722


Calipers to measure wall thicknesses. And a good line of credit on your Credit card!

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

View dataz722's profile

dataz722

28 posts in 1085 days


#26 posted 12-15-2018 10:13 PM


I think I am about to purchase my first lathe and everything that goes with it. I just want some opinions if I might be overlooking something or if I should go with something different for anything as I would like to order everything at once. I plan to start out doing spindle stuff (pens, seam rippers, gift things, pepper mills etc) but would eventually like to try bowls. I have not decided if I want to go with carbide or hss tools and haven t really looked into chucks too much yet. Also, I already have a slow speed grinder and wolverine jig.

Rikon Model 70-1218VS Lathe
Mandrel saver kit from PSI
Whiteside barrel trimmer set
Micromesh
sandpaper
nonstick bushings
varigrind

I really feel like I am missing something there….

Thanks

- dataz722

Calipers to measure wall thicknesses. And a good line of credit on your Credit card!

- Jack Lewis

I actually picked up a set of calipers along with the lathe yesterday at woodcraft. Saw they were on sale for 50% off and realized I had forgotten about them.

And if I didn’t already have far too much debt that would be nice.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2437 posts in 2525 days


#27 posted 12-16-2018 12:57 PM

If you decide to try carbide (dont recommend it, learn how to sharpen and use hss tools properly), make your own, not difficult. Here are my shop made tools, and a review on Capn Eddie inserts.

If/when you decide to go beyond pens, get a chainsaw to cut up free green wood. Buying turning blanks gets expensive. I use a small 10” craftsman bandsaw to cut up spindle blanks and smaller bowl/box blanks. Chainsaw is good enough for larger bowl blanks.

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