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Need easy hack to resaw 6+ inch tall for wrapping beams

by Marc Bachman
posted 12-06-2018 03:22 PM


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71 replies

71 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

7070 posts in 2895 days


#1 posted 12-06-2018 03:43 PM

Do you have a particular species in mind? Most may be available from hardwood suppliers in the dimensions you require. That would save a tremendous amount of time dimensioning the lumber…but obviously cost more up front.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2035 posts in 3595 days


#2 posted 12-06-2018 03:47 PM

Why resaw the stock in the first place? Just make a faux beam to wrap the current one with mitered 3/4” thick stock.

If you have a planer, you could even plane it down to 1/2”.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5364 posts in 3540 days


#3 posted 12-06-2018 03:51 PM

I really don’t think a HF BS is up to the task for resawing. It might require a larger motor, good blade guides. You might end up spending $800 to make a HF BS workable. Look for a used BS like a Delta, Jet, PM, etc. I think the HF would be a waste of money. Just my opinion. You might also consider a furniture grade plywood in whatever thickness you want. Just rip the plywood to the desired width, miter the edge and apply to your beams.Depending on the size of the beams, 1/4” plywood could be used, saving you much money.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1328 posts in 3146 days


#4 posted 12-06-2018 03:55 PM

If you’ve got a TS you can rip a kerf on each edge at the highest height of your TS blade and then use a Japanese back saw to split the two pieces into two boards. A few passes with a #4 or #5 will flatten out the cut faces and you’re ready to go. If you’re not moderately experienced with setting up the BS well for resaw, this may be your quickest and best result as opposed to battling any drift or bowing of your stock in the BS. FWIW, I didn’t even hesitate to put a riser kit in my 14” BS, and run 105” blade. I have had to do a lot of practice to learn how to get the results I want, without getting tapered boards that need several passes through the planer to get back to square and parallel. When I need a quick resaw and am not too concerned with the amount of wood lost from the blade kerf of the TS blade vs. the BS blade this is how I do it.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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GR8HUNTER

5682 posts in 1009 days


#5 posted 12-06-2018 04:42 PM

what wood will you be using ? ?

how thick are you thinking of using ? ?

painted , stained ,natural ? ?

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#6 posted 12-06-2018 11:46 PM

In reply, I have definitely eliminated any idea of plywood mosaic since my beams are 20+ feet, and plywood finish attempts always have such an ugly seam. My idea was to resaw Douglas Fir dimensional to ~.5 inch thick. I know the older HF bandsaws will resaw Doug Fir, I watched it done. I’m not totally sure resawing a 16 foot board will be easy, but, hey, It was going to cost me at least $800 to have someone do it, and I buy the wood. I can rip a 2X6 with a 10” table saw, but that isn’t what I want either. My impression is that this is a forum for people who spend the big money and don’t struggle with details of jerking around with a machine that needs to be adapted in some way. I could have taken my orbital sander to the beams to get rid of the coarse “hair” on them, but i hate overhead work and filling my house with sanding dust such that I thought I could do it easier by just recovering them with a layer of wood. I planned to experiment with prefinishing the wood that I would use. I have a handy dandy airless that helps me with finishing jobs.

-- Marc, Kansas.

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Manitario

2735 posts in 3179 days


#7 posted 12-07-2018 12:20 AM

As others have suggested, why don’t you use 3/4 dimensional lumber and either plane it down to 1/2” or just leave as is? Seems like a huge make-work project to resaw. Trying to resaw a 16’ board is a nightmare, even on a great bandsaw.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1276 posts in 1704 days


#8 posted 12-07-2018 12:25 AM

Like others have asked, why do you need to resaw? Make it easy on yourself and use 3/4, 4/4, whatever you can get from the mill /yard
Trust me we don’t all spend big money. We also don’t like unnecessary work

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1797 posts in 900 days


#9 posted 12-07-2018 03:50 AM

If you are planning on resawing step away from the HF saw.

It has it’s uses but also has it’s limits. I don’t spend big money on anything but I did have to dump my HF bandsaw when I started resawing.

16’? Probably wouldn’t even attempt it.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#10 posted 12-07-2018 08:04 AM


Why resaw the stock in the first place? Just make a faux beam to wrap the current one with mitered 3/4” thick stock.

If you have a planer, you could even plane it down to 1/2”.

- jonah


This would not be economical at all, an acceptable grade of inch nominal white pine or yellow pine is as much as oak around here. Part of the reason I would resaw, if possible, is to save money on wood. I would also need to rabbet joints to make the box beam, and it would be very heavy once assembled. If I were going to do this, I should take down the beams I am considering trying to cover. And get a rolling scaffold.

-- Marc, Kansas.

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#11 posted 12-07-2018 08:13 AM


If you ve got a TS you can rip a kerf on each edge at the highest height of your TS blade and then use a Japanese back saw to split the two pieces into two boards. A few passes with a #4 or #5 will flatten out the cut faces and you re ready to go. If you re not moderately experienced with setting up the BS well for resaw, this may be your quickest and best result as opposed to battling any drift or bowing of your stock in the BS. FWIW, I didn t even hesitate to put a riser kit in my 14” BS, and run 105” blade. I have had to do a lot of practice to learn how to get the results I want, without getting tapered boards that need several passes through the planer to get back to square and parallel. When I need a quick resaw and am not too concerned with the amount of wood lost from the blade kerf of the TS blade vs. the BS blade this is how I do it.

- ChefHDAN


I have done this on smaller projects, this time around I want to try a different approach. Sort of like a thick veneer. I have only bandsawed short boards, so I thought if I could conquer the height problem I would address the problem of how to cut it straight next. Since I didn’t get a rip fence, I would need to devise something like an oversize fence, perhaps a homemade custom guide ( I cut and weld steel, too ) that would keep the material from getting way off the intended cut line, like fences on both sides of the material(?) I have worked in shops where there are large tables made to slide material on that are the exact height of the saw table. I might try something like that. Hey I just thought, Why not use laminate? No!!

-- Marc, Kansas.

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Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#12 posted 12-07-2018 08:22 AM



If you are planning on resawing step away from the HF saw.

It has it s uses but also has it s limits. I don t spend big money on anything but I did have to dump my HF bandsaw when I started resawing.

16 ? Probably wouldn t even attempt it.

- Andybb


Supposedly the electric motor is not the limitation of this saw. If I proceed, I will probably find the limitation, which is more likely to do with the wheels that the blade is driven by, and their support structure, and the blade guides. I am already trying to overcome the limitation of the maximum rip height. What limitation(s) did you find when you were resawing with the HF bandsaw? I guess we are talking about the same saw?

-- Marc, Kansas.

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Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#13 posted 12-07-2018 08:33 AM


As others have suggested, why don t you use 3/4 dimensional lumber and either plane it down to 1/2” or just leave as is? Seems like a huge make-work project to resaw. Trying to resaw a 16 board is a nightmare, even on a great bandsaw.

- Manitario


Make work? Yeah. I’m busier right now deciding if it can even be done. It’s dicey to try it at all, but I’m a brave SOB. I should have died a few times. If the equipment will do the work, Ill keep pushing the material through. I have ripped ( split ) 2X6s the long way with a 10” table saw and or dadoed 2X6s to spline some heavy ass doors together a few times, so fighting with large boards is not new to me. What I wonder, other than the longevity of my HF saw, is the major design limitation that I might be up against? Oh, and I don’t love Chinese tools that much except that I have worked probably three years of my life to pay for tools that I have owned. Now that I am at the end of my tool collecting career, I think I have room to economize when I can.

-- Marc, Kansas.

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#14 posted 12-07-2018 08:55 AM



Like others have asked, why do you need to resaw? Make it easy on yourself and use 3/4, 4/4, whatever you can get from the mill /yard
Trust me we don t all spend big money. We also don t like unnecessary work

- GrantA

I have 10 full beams 16-20 feet and 2 half beams to wrap. Inch nominal wood to do the work at $3 board/ft and up would be about, oh, what, $1200 or more? Versus a couple hundred or so if I can rip down 2X8s.

-- Marc, Kansas.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1328 posts in 3146 days


#15 posted 12-07-2018 11:28 AM


......different approach. Sort of like a thick veneer. I have only bandsawed short boards, so I thought if I could conquer the height problem I would address the problem of how to cut it straight next. Since I didn t get a rip fence, I would need to devise something like an oversize fence, perhaps a homemade custom guide ( I cut and weld steel, too ) that would keep the material from getting way off the intended cut line, like fences on both sides of the material(?)...
- Marc Bachman

Marc, there is alot of outside influences when using a BS, even if you devise a method to hold the board “dead-nuts” square on the table the blades can still deflect twist bow etc. the longer the taller the board, the challenges increase, but you’re a man on a mission, and I can respect that, please post photos of your project and share your challenges and triumphs with us here so we can learn along with you.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

916 posts in 1515 days


#16 posted 12-07-2018 01:57 PM


. If I were going to do this, I should take down the beams I am considering trying to cover. And get a rolling scaffold.

- Marc Bachman

so these arent load bearing beams?

View bmerrill's profile

bmerrill

45 posts in 370 days


#17 posted 12-07-2018 02:10 PM

Marc,
See you are a man on a mission.
If you cannot replace the BS, then at a minimum get the riser kit.
Invest in several 1/2” resaw blades such as the Highland Resaw King.
If you don’t have a planer, your job becomes much more difficult.
The saw will need a tall fence and a tall support/feather board on the other side. You can build these. Clamp them to the work table, then add more clamps. A 16 foot board is a very long pry bar.
Resawing long boards is a time to gather some friends, roller stands, or other infeed/outfeed supports. I have resawn 15 foot boards 1” wide, 8” tall by myself on a decent 14” 1-3/4hp bandsaw, so it can be done, much easier with help. You will have to go slow and don’t expect to have a perfect product after resawing. Just plain them down to a uniform thickness. Good luck.

-- "Do. Or do not. There is no try". Yoda

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johnstoneb

3089 posts in 2469 days


#18 posted 12-07-2018 02:13 PM

A riser kit is drilled and dowelled to keep both halves of the band saw in alignment. How are you going to do this with your homemade shim. If you want to open that can of worms go for. it.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Steve's profile (online now)

Steve

1065 posts in 879 days


#19 posted 12-07-2018 02:27 PM

I think you’d have better luck either building a portable bandsaw milll

or using the table saw.

i’d be curious to see your setup for getting 16’ boards leveled and supported on both ends of the cut.

View SMP's profile

SMP

445 posts in 202 days


#20 posted 12-07-2018 03:10 PM

If the goal is cheap, then rip 2×4s in the table saw to 1/2” or so and plane, edge glue together. Personally i’d probably buy 1/2” poplar to save the time and frustration.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1195 days


#21 posted 12-07-2018 03:35 PM

Marc, by all of your responses, I see you have your mind made up.
You are fighting an uphill battle.

Once you start resawing your wood you will see what is a lot of work.
Your pieces won’t be straight, they will need to be run through a planner,
If you get that far your 2×8 lumber will more than likely twist, crack or cup.

You asked:
”Please feel free to make suggestions,
especially if you have experience that can save me wasting time and or money. ”

You have plenty of comments to help you.
Good Luck

EDIT:
”Inch nominal wood to do the work at $3 board/ft and up would be about, oh, what, $1200 or more?”

1 x 8 x 16 @ 13.52 a board approx. 500.00

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#22 posted 12-07-2018 03:59 PM


A riser kit is drilled and dowelled to keep both halves of the band saw in alignment. How are you going to do this with your homemade shim. If you want to open that can of worms go for. it.

- johnstoneb


Ani avashel. A riser kit is another $100 dollars I would spend on a marginal piece of equipment by all assessments. Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead. BTW, what does “quality” equate to in the scale between #3 and clear? I called, menards doesn’t really know. The picture looks like “D” pine, somehow I doubt that.

-- Marc, Kansas.

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

341 posts in 946 days


#23 posted 12-07-2018 04:04 PM

Apart from all the setup issues that have to be addressed, boards often have a mind of their own when you start slicing them apart.
If you decide to resaw these long boards please take the time to document it with pictures (video even better, doesn’t need to be professional quality) and share the experience whether it is successful or not.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#24 posted 12-07-2018 04:10 PM



I think you d have better luck either building a portable bandsaw milll

or using the table saw.

i d be curious to see your setup for getting 16 boards leveled and supported on both ends of the cut.

- Steve


I am envisioning a 24X72 infeed table and a 48X96 outfeed table, both secured to the bandsaw. On a sunny day in my driveway.

-- Marc, Kansas.

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

341 posts in 946 days


#25 posted 12-07-2018 04:11 PM


1 x 8 x 16 @ 13.52 a board approx. 500.00
- jbay

This kinda seems like a no brainer solution vs resawing.
But I would still like to see the resawing solution pictures / videos.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#26 posted 12-07-2018 04:12 PM



If the goal is cheap, then rip 2×4s in the table saw to 1/2” or so and plane, edge glue together. Personally i’d probably buy 1/2” poplar to save the time and frustration.

- SMP


I haven’t seen 1/2 inch poplar around here. Is that paint grade or stainable? How much is it a board ft.?

-- Marc, Kansas.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2035 posts in 3595 days


#27 posted 12-07-2018 04:16 PM

Any good lumberyard will have 1/2” poplar or pine. It’s used quite a bit in trim.

This will be my last comment here:

I would under no circumstances try to resaw a 16 foot board on a band saw. Not in a million years. You’ll end up with a ski jump, not a flat board.

If you’re bound and determined to not use dimensional lumber off the shelf, I would spend the ~$500 on a good sander that captures all the dust and work with the existing beams. Or I’d paint them.

View SMP's profile

SMP

445 posts in 202 days


#28 posted 12-07-2018 04:34 PM


I haven t seen 1/2 inch poplar around here. Is that paint grade or stainable? How much is it a board ft.?

- Marc Bachman

Stainable, s2s. I used it to redo my staircase for the risers and side treads on the sides of the carpet. Looks beautiful with GF gel stain. That one is interesting as here it is sold by square feet. I don’t remember the price, but it saved me a TON of time doing my staircase.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

916 posts in 1515 days


#29 posted 12-07-2018 07:30 PM



Marc, by all of your responses, I see you have your mind made up.
You are fighting an uphill battle.

Once you start resawing your wood you will see what is a lot of work.
Your pieces won t be straight, they will need to be run through a planner,
If you get that far your 2×8 lumber will more than likely twist, crack or cup.

- jbay

welp, he did say in the beginning:
” I’m wasting time trying to do it with a $300 dollar bandsaw.”

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#30 posted 12-07-2018 10:14 PM

We’re going in men. I’m going to order custom length 3TPI blade(s) (?) and jack up the top part with a short shim. And use some long infeed and outfeed tables. The ambulance will be on speed dial.

-- Marc, Kansas.

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shampeon

1900 posts in 2480 days


#31 posted 12-07-2018 10:36 PM

Nothing in this thread makes any sense at all.

The mind reels at “I don’t like the look of these ceiling beams, so I’m going to wrap them in construction grade 2×8s.” But it does have that old familiar “give me advice, no not that advice” thing going for it.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1276 posts in 1704 days


#32 posted 12-07-2018 11:17 PM

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groygroy

18 posts in 771 days


#33 posted 12-07-2018 11:30 PM

I think a 10 inch table saw will resaw a 6 inch board for you if you run it from top and bottom (flip the board… don’t know how to explain that well). Just do that. Your BS is not designed to resaw. Even on a nice, hefty, large BS your going to need a resaw blade and an extensive fence to get a straight BS cut on pieces that long.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

916 posts in 1515 days


#34 posted 12-08-2018 02:08 PM



I think a 10 inch table saw will resaw a 6 inch board for you if you run it from top and bottom (flip the board… don t know how to explain that well). Just do that.

- groygroy

ive resawn quite a bit on my TS. 6 1/4” total.
done some 8” stuff with it,too. used a sawzall and limbing blade to finish what wasnt cut then a trip through the planer. worked pretty good.

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

858 posts in 3362 days


#35 posted 12-08-2018 02:27 PM

Marc: With all due respect, if you already had made up your mind, why did you waste your time asking for help? Plus wasting the time of all the jocks trying to offer advice; by then rejecting all of said advice and forging ahead. I wish you luck with your project; but want to state from personal experience that sometimes taking a “shortcut” by trying to use sub-par equipment that has been amateurishly modified will end up costing you more time, and money in wasted materials; not to mention any personal danger that you might place yourself in. Far be it from me to categorically state that your method will not work. In short, if you really want advice, the folks here are more than happy to help you however they can. With their experience, and your lack thereof, maybe it might be good to take the help next time, if offered. Regardless, good luck, work safely and have fun.

PS: Why did you have to go to HF to measure the display bandsaw? Why couldn’t you measure your own?

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#36 posted 12-08-2018 09:39 PM



Nothing in this thread makes any sense at all.

The mind reels at “I don t like the look of these ceiling beams, so I m going to wrap them in construction grade 2×8s.” But it does have that old familiar “give me advice, no not that advice” thing going for it.

- shampeon


I should probably post before pictures here. Imagine beams that have a sort of a wood grain under an inch of coarse hair. Stained almost black, with a black hair gel, and then 3/4 inch square trim all the way around. Yes. It needs to be taken down or covered. The 2×8s are a 2 and better, and I have used the same thing before as a finish material. You may have seen the new knotty alder look in some homes. Anyway, I’ll use my faux skills to preserve the grain look, and keep the stain from going dark. I’m sure you’ll love it. When I saw people using 8 foot sticks of radial cut oak veneer as a finish material, I knew the standard for hardwood trim had gone down.

-- Marc, Kansas.

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Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#37 posted 12-08-2018 09:46 PM


Marc: With all due respect, if you already had made up your mind, why did you waste your time asking for help? Plus wasting the time of all the jocks trying to offer advice; by then rejecting all of said advice and forging ahead. I wish you luck with your project; but want to state from personal experience that sometimes taking a “shortcut” by trying to use sub-par equipment that has been amateurishly modified will end up costing you more time, and money in wasted materials; not to mention any personal danger that you might place yourself in. Far be it from me to categorically state that your method will not work. In short, if you really want advice, the folks here are more than happy to help you however they can. With their experience, and your lack thereof, maybe it might be good to take the help next time, if offered. Regardless, good luck, work safely and have fun.

PS: Why did you have to go to HF to measure the display bandsaw? Why couldn t you measure your own?

- Woodbum


I hope my responses hereto have been perceived as respectful. My hope was to discover a method to use my cheapo saw. My next problem is to figure out how to attach a fence to it. Mine is still in the box, when I get geared up, I’ll put everything together. I went to the showroom today and discovered I can probably use the 93 inch blade, jack up the top part with a ~ 1.25” shim, and leave the blade tensioner at its lowest setting, saving me the cost of custom blades. I did not know that this forum would be as critical of my ideas, but I have adjusted to having a categorically different approach than normal. i see that there are two basic types of bandsaws for wood, and it may be that the type I have just isnt’ beefy enough for what I want to do. I’m going to find out for us.

-- Marc, Kansas.

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runswithscissors

2987 posts in 2321 days


#38 posted 12-10-2018 02:19 AM

Since the idea of removing the beams has already been mentioned, am I out of line to suggest removing the beams and running them through the planer? Then there’s no need to wrap them with anything. Maybe could even be hand planed. You’d only need to do 3 sides.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#39 posted 12-10-2018 03:32 PM



Since the idea of removing the beams has already been mentioned, am I out of line to suggest removing the beams and running them through the planer? Then there s no need to wrap them with anything. Maybe could even be hand planed. You d only need to do 3 sides.

- runswithscissors


Alas, the beams are red cedar. This species, unless painted skillfully, looks like something you dredged up from the bottom of the river and used because you had no idea of the natural order of species.

-- Marc, Kansas.

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GrantA

1276 posts in 1704 days


#40 posted 12-10-2018 03:34 PM

You’d rather see construction grade lumber with joints as a skin than solid red cedar beams?!? Wow

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Jack Lewis

397 posts in 1374 days


#41 posted 12-10-2018 04:15 PM



Hello, I m brand new, so give me a tiny break. I want to wrap my shaggy wooden ceiling beams with a nicer wood, and I will need a width which seems to be slightly above what my Central Machinery bandsaw is designed to cut. The saw description claims it will saw 6 inch vertically, but I went to Harbor Freight and it s more like 5 3/4 on the floor demo machine. I see that there are 95 inch bandsaw blades available, and it occurred to me that If I could just put a steel shim between the upper part and the lower part, something like the factory made kits will do, only I would use a less than one inch shim, I could get my six inch height. I don t think buying a riser kit for $100 or so is really necessary(?). I thought about making some shorter trunnions for the table for this project, but that is much harder than the shim idea. I could also grind some off of the upper blade guide assembly, but I would need to replace it later,and I m not completely sure that I can t get a full 6 inches without modifications. Please feel free to make suggestions, especially if you have experience that can save me wasting time and or money. Oh, and my wife wouldn t let me buy a $800 dollar bandsaw which is why I m wasting time trying to do it with a $300 dollar bandsaw.

- Marc Bachman


There has been a lot of advise here, good and ?. You seem hell bent on attempting something that most LJ’s have said is impracticable. You want to make your vision of this task happen but are not (the wife?, no disrespect) prepared to use the tools, advise and wisdom of those whom you asked. Some of the methods you propose, (ripping 2×8x16’s) (using/modifying bargain store tools), all seem “penny wise/pound foolish” for a job that you have placed certain quality restriction upon. You have rejected plywood covering because of seams. You will still have seams with your method. Your description of “nicer wood” and $300 is inconsistent.
If you are headstrong on doing this job in this manner, IMHO, farm the resawing out to someone equipped and skilled to handle the job.

As a suggestion, you could install 1×2’s that would look like a laminated beam and be better off than starting a job that is doomed.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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ShaneA

7070 posts in 2895 days


#42 posted 12-10-2018 04:21 PM

Resawing construction grade lumber 16’ long is a recipe for frustration. Pretty sure that falls into the “fact” category. Lots better ways to skin this cat. Please read thru again, and proceed with caution.

Pics would be fantastic. Just sayin’

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jonah

2035 posts in 3595 days


#43 posted 12-10-2018 06:49 PM

Did we ever get an answer as to whether the beams are structural or not?

If they’re not, I like the “take them down and plane them” advice. Red cedar is very attractive wood IMO.

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GrantA

1276 posts in 1704 days


#44 posted 12-10-2018 06:51 PM

Hit em in place with a hand plane even!

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

423 posts in 884 days


#45 posted 12-10-2018 07:10 PM

One minor point. A 6” bandsaw does not refer to the max cutting height. It refers to the distance from the blade to the riser or width – not height.

M

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Fresch

406 posts in 2217 days


#46 posted 12-10-2018 09:31 PM

Lauan or get a chainsaw mill

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jonah

2035 posts in 3595 days


#47 posted 12-11-2018 01:52 AM



Hit em in place with a hand plane even!

- GrantA


Hand planing over your head sounds challenging. It’d probably be a great workout though.

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GrantA

1276 posts in 1704 days


#48 posted 12-11-2018 01:57 AM


Hit em in place with a hand plane even!

- GrantA

Hand planing over your head sounds challenging. It d probably be a great workout though.

- jonah


I’m not sure it’d be more challenging than resawing 16ft 2x!

View Marc Bachman's profile

Marc Bachman

23 posts in 103 days


#49 posted 12-11-2018 04:22 PM



One minor point. A 6” bandsaw does not refer to the max cutting height. It refers to the distance from the blade to the riser or width – not height.

M

- Madmark2


I’m not sure I mentioned it, but I have been to the showroom to measure the vitals of the bandsaw in question, what I saw is that there is about 5.6?” between the table and the bottom of the upper blade guide. My newest plan is to use a standard 93 inch blade, lower the belt tensioning adjustment to the lowest possible setting, and experiment with shim heights between the lower part of the band saw and the upper part of the bandsaw, somewhat like a riser kit would accomplish, except in the range of ~.75 inch to 1 inch or larger if possible.

-- Marc, Kansas.

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jonah

2035 posts in 3595 days


#50 posted 12-11-2018 04:24 PM

The HF bandsaw, like a lot of HF power tools, is a piece of crap. Every review I’ve read says so. It’s probably okay for cutting curves in things. It’s not useful at all for resawing.

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