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View AndyVr's profile

What to buy next with $200

by AndyVr
posted 12-06-2018 02:26 AM


24 replies so far

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3717 days


#1 posted 12-06-2018 02:36 AM

I would suggest working mentally going through your next planned project and putting the tools you need to accomplish it at the top of the list.

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

216 posts in 1251 days


#2 posted 12-06-2018 02:50 AM

My first projects were pieces of furniture using hand dovetailed joints. Making those required chisels and I preferred japanese pullsaws.

I find hand planes invaluable—look for a No. 4 plane. Learn to sharpen chisels and planes using the “scary sharp” method.

If you don’t have dust collection, get a good 3m respirator to save your lungs.

A plunge router is how I cut mortises using a homemade jig. I cut tenons with a dado set and table saw.

Hopefully that gives you some ideas

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1308 posts in 835 days


#3 posted 12-06-2018 03:08 AM

If that $200 will cover a thickness planet, I’d have to give it the nod. : )

All kidding aside, I’d keep watch for a reasonably priced planer. Two hundred should go a long way towards the cost of one. Good luck.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3717 days


#4 posted 12-06-2018 03:53 AM



If that $200 will cover a thickness planet, I d have to give it the nod. : )

Well if he buys that planet it will give him 2 planets which is well on his way to owning his own solar system something Gates, Zuckerberg, Bezos and Buffet haven’t even managed… We would probably be in awe of the size of his shop as well, heck his bench has its own planet. :)

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117627 posts in 3972 days


#5 posted 12-06-2018 05:47 AM

you mentioned a dado stack I think for your $200 budget that’s a good choice. I really like this one.

https://www.infinitytools.com/dadonator-stacked-dado-blade-set-with-5-8-bore

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2876 posts in 969 days


#6 posted 12-06-2018 09:14 AM

Personally before I bought a dado blade I would be looking at a nice router to put into a router table. Using fences you can use a router dado jig to hand cut any size Dado you may want, then when it comes to edging, and making all types of joinery a dado blade can only do so much.

Many of us started out with our first router table as not much more than a hole in a few pieces of glued up plywood, with a 2×4 as the fence, well after jointing and ripping it square and true.

Just because it’s the best path to getting stock 4 square I see a TS, Jointer, Planer, Router table, as the beginning tools to get, unless you are going to use hand tools to get there. After those 4 a Dado blade would be near the top for accessories, if not a bandsaw.

-- Think safe, be safe

View hkmiller's profile

hkmiller

136 posts in 477 days


#7 posted 12-06-2018 01:19 PM

Harbor Freight has super coupon for the Bauer 12.5” planer for 249.00.

Don’t know much about the quality, etc.


If that $200 will cover a thickness planet, I d have to give it the nod. : )

All kidding aside, I d keep watch for a reasonably priced planer. Two hundred should go a long way towards the cost of one. Good luck.

- BlasterStumps


If that $200 will cover a thickness planet, I d have to give it the nod. : )

All kidding aside, I d keep watch for a reasonably priced planer. Two hundred should go a long way towards the cost of one. Good luck.

- BlasterStumps


-- always something

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

265 posts in 926 days


#8 posted 12-06-2018 01:32 PM

I would base it off of your next project. I will say the most versatile tools in a shop are probably router, drill press, tablesaw and bandsaw. With them you can build most projects and depending on needs bandsaw and tablesaw can overlap a lot.

If I were focused on just flatwork, I would not want to do a project without a tablesaw, drill press, router, and random orbit sander (I hate hand sanding). You get into anything with lots of curves or lathe work, the bandsaw quickly goes from “nice to have” to “how did I work without”. Build a router table, even a simple one, and you have a very flexible tool with the router. Eventually you will want multiple routers so one can stay in the table and one for hand work.

Miter Saw or Radial Arm Saw, Planer, Jointer, and Thickness Sander in that order are where I focus machines/upgrades after those core pieces for what I like to do.

View GrantA's profile

GrantA

1512 posts in 1803 days


#9 posted 12-06-2018 01:41 PM

Guys he has Amazon gift cards to use, has to buy from Amazon. I suggest looking for “used” items from Amazon warehouse, which are typically either unused returns or items with damaged packaging. They rebox before shipping.
Just make sure to check it out as soon as it delivers and contact Amazon if anything is wrong. I’ve gotten several deals that way

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9599 posts in 1533 days


#10 posted 12-06-2018 02:01 PM



Hey guys. I been a silent lurker for many years and finally signed up.

I was gifted some gift cards through work for a project we finished early. I am struggling in what to buy with them since it is Amazon cards.

I have a Ridgid r4512, bench top planet, craftsman fix based 1.5hp vintage router and typical sanders and drills.

I am lacking a bandsaw, drill press, dado stack, or a plunge router, thickness planet.

I don’t think I want to go over $200 so I don’t have to pull money out of my pocket but what would you buy next?

I recently did shaker doors with a thin mitt blade for the tennons and the grove. Fun experience to say the least.

I want to build an easel for my kids and also some end tables that will. Need a mortise and tenon.

Curious what you would suggest.

- AndyVr

So do you have a thickness “planet” or not? I’m confused. If not, I’d probably focus my efforts on finding a warehouse deal on a decent one of those. Also, what is a “thin mitt” blade?

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View AndyVr's profile

AndyVr

4 posts in 202 days


#11 posted 12-06-2018 04:03 PM

Thanks for the replies. I do not have a thickness planner.

Need to think long and hard about this!

View mathguy1981's profile

mathguy1981

93 posts in 299 days


#12 posted 12-06-2018 04:16 PM

I say drill press.
It sounds like your concerned about joinery. You can cut MOST of what you need on the table saw, and the router/drill press. Don’t worry about the plunge feature, it’s seldom used. However, a drill press would be much easier/safer for making mortises. You just have to clean them up with a chisel or your router with a guide, which no longer has to make the plunge cut bc you drilled out the meat of the cut already. And you can obviously drill straight holes in anything else.

-- Two thumbs and counting

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2241 posts in 3033 days


#13 posted 12-06-2018 09:03 PM

Ah, that’s clear now! No planet. Only a planner.

I’ll just trow out an idea: Get you a Incra Miter 1000HD and a Narex chisels or rasps..

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2241 posts in 3033 days


#14 posted 12-06-2018 10:06 PM

.. I meant “a few chisels”, not “a chisels”.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1881 days


#15 posted 12-06-2018 10:27 PM

Drill press

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3717 days


#16 posted 12-06-2018 10:52 PM



Thanks for the replies. I do not have a thickness planner.

Need to think long and hard about this!

- AndyVr

So the benchtop “planer” you have is a jointer?

View AndyVr's profile

AndyVr

4 posts in 202 days


#17 posted 12-06-2018 11:10 PM

The bench top planet I should have said is a Jointer and not a planer.

I just built a cabinet for our laundry room and used a thin kirf combo blade to make my dados. Took some time but with a stop block I was able to get this done along with some tennons. It was a pain to say the least though.

I am torn on this. A dado would be a great addition but I also wish I had the drill press to make more accurate holes that are straight. The reason for a bandsaw is more or less for the ability to resaw some lumber and make more accurate curves vs using the jig saw. Thickness planner would come in use in parallel with the bandsaw I believe.

View torus's profile

torus

283 posts in 808 days


#18 posted 12-06-2018 11:29 PM

$200 amazon card = drill press

-- "It's getting better..." - put this on my RIP stone!

View masterjer's profile

masterjer

14 posts in 754 days


#19 posted 12-06-2018 11:47 PM

Personally, I vote for the router. It is one of the most versatile tools in the shop and can be used for mortises and tenons as well as dados. Building a simple table for it makes it even more versatile. Your gift cards would get you into a decent router along with some bits for it.

View RichBolduc's profile

RichBolduc

899 posts in 512 days


#20 posted 12-07-2018 02:22 AM

I’m going the router route too. I’d spend the extra $75 and grab this. I love mine in a table

Triton TRA001 3-1/4 HP Dual Mode Precision Plunge Router https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00779ND0Q/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_UKDcCbR5MM48F

Rich

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

607 posts in 306 days


#21 posted 12-07-2018 05:22 AM

Just like a business plan, but this is a tool plan. What I did is make a on going Tool list with 5 categories. Divided it in sections. “Hand Tools” (chisels, planes, scrapers, glue bots, saws, jigs, etc.), “Portable Power Tools” (router, drills, power planer, belt sanders, etc.) “Clamps”, “Router Bits”, “Power Equipment” (router table, spindle or belt sanders, band saw, scroll saw, etc.). Like a ledger, list the headers across top of page. Fill in below the heading any tool you could use, regardless of cost. Time to go through your tools and write down what your missing or don’t have. Then give each item in that column a priority (1, 2, 3, 4, and etc.). This will help ensure that you get what is “needed” & not waste your money on a “Would nice to have”. Save this list for future reference. One thing you’ll notice is that your more apt to end up with the tools to complete your shop, with a list like this. Add to it or cross off items as you build your shop.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8652 posts in 2972 days


#22 posted 12-07-2018 05:30 AM

Don’t cheat yourself. Buy some Alder and make beautiful items to sell.

Take the profits rinse and repeat, along the way purchase some Japanese pull saws and chisels

to make your mortise and tenons for your end tables.

Best of Luck!

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

607 posts in 306 days


#23 posted 12-07-2018 06:07 AM

Seems like you already made up your mind at the end of your post. Mortise and tenon jig. Tenons can be cut on your table saw, and the mortise can be drilled by hand or with a drill press then cleaned up with a chisel. a inexpensive drill press you can get on Amazon for less than $150. or $175. With a drill press, go with the best you can afford. You might use a drill press more than a mortise tenon jig. A planer is nice to have, but more than $200. A Dado Stack you can hold off, cut a few more passes with the table saw to get your dado cut. or use your router and a straight edge to get the dado cut. The plunge router base I don’t use very often. but is nice if you get a mortise tenon jig. With a router table you can cut both your mortise & tenons, and very handy to have. And Amazon has a Craftsman Table and Router combo set for $112.99. while supply lasts.. THIS IS THE YOUR BEST OPTION I THINK. The table saw, router table and edge sander are the power tools I use most. after those it’s the planer, drill press and band saw.

View AndyVr's profile

AndyVr

4 posts in 202 days


#24 posted 12-14-2018 05:13 PM

Thanks for the insight. I am leaning towards the drill press and possibly just getting the Dado stack as well.

The Irwin Marples, sd208, or DeWalt seem like a good buy.

In regards to drill press the Wens seem to have good reviews for the 10” units. Short quick for little over 2 inches tho.

Any thoughts on the above?

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