LumberJocks

All Replies on End grain on circular table top edge

  • Advertise with us
View Noel's profile

End grain on circular table top edge

by Noel
posted 12-05-2018 11:45 PM


10 replies so far

View jmos's profile

jmos

913 posts in 2673 days


#1 posted 12-06-2018 02:13 AM

My guess would be that the wood didn’t like being cut “up hill.” Take a look at the table and think about how you routed the circle; are the problem areas the areas you routed the end grain against the grain?

Ideally, when your cutting a concave curve, you would cut in from both ends, stopping at the bottom, so you are downhill in both directions. (Or form the top down each side on a convex curve.)

You may want to try taking a very light skim cut all around with your router and a sharp bit, it may help smooth out the rough spots.

I’m just speculating here, but maybe instead you could try doing the skim cut in segments, where you’re running downhill each time. So, basically cut 1/4 of the table at a time, from a long grain area to the middle of the end grain area. Again, haven’t tried it, but it’s a similar idea to using a spokeshave from each end of a curve.

-- John

View Noel's profile

Noel

58 posts in 111 days


#2 posted 12-06-2018 01:22 PM

I think you’re right, John. When I did the cut, I went all the way around in one pass, all in the same direction. I should have tried to go downhill in end grain areas. I am going to apply a little BLO or similar to the affected areas to get a sense for how it looks before I decide whether to skim the edge again. It’s only an 18” table and the wood is a gift from my daughter – I’m terrified of ruining it after getting this far in the project. Thanks a bunch for the input. When I can, I’ll post a photo.

-- Just make the cut

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8729 posts in 1442 days


#3 posted 12-06-2018 01:29 PM

Noel, no photobucket account needed. Just upload pics directly using the img button.

This is a problem I have often when turning Walnut bowls. The endgrain always requires attention. I think a light skim cut in 2 directions is a good bet in your case. I’ve also had luck with soaking the endgrain areas with BLO just before making finishing cuts. It seems to make the fibers more ameniable to being severed rather than tearing out. Also, make sure the bit you’re using is clean and sharp.

Best of luck!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Noel's profile

Noel

58 posts in 111 days


#4 posted 12-06-2018 01:40 PM

I think you’re right, John. When I did the cut, I went all the way around in one pass, all in the same direction. I should have tried to go downhill in end grain areas. I am going to apply a little BLO or similar to the affected areas to get a sense for how it looks before I decide whether to skim the edge again. It’s only an 18” table and the wood is a gift from my daughter – I’m terrified of ruining it after getting this far in the project. Thanks a bunch for the input. When I can, I’ll post a photo.

-- Just make the cut

View Noel's profile

Noel

58 posts in 111 days


#5 posted 12-06-2018 01:44 PM

Kenny, so the walnut is the culprit? Good idea on the BLO and the bit was a brand new Freud. Thanks for the pic tip – I’m still learning. Here’s the table top.

Most importantly, my daughter is at VA Tech – go Hokies!!!!

-- Just make the cut

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8729 posts in 1442 days


#6 posted 12-06-2018 01:50 PM

Nice Noel. I like the inclusion of sapwood with Walnut. However, the sapwood is softer and more prone to tearout too. I’d almost be willing to bet the worst of your issues are in the sapwood areas? Advice previously given is still the best I have. If a skim cut fails to leave an acceptable surface, you might try some sanding sealer (personally, I just use a couple coats of shellac) then settle in with sandpaper and elbow grease.

Your daughter is a smart gal! ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

667 posts in 1044 days


#7 posted 12-06-2018 02:07 PM

I think Ken and John have already given you excellent advice, but I’d throw in one last recommendation if taking another light pass is out of the question: maybe work on the end-grain with a card scraper? You can find scrapers with a radius like this: https://www.amazon.com/Crown-376-Cabinet-Scraper-Gooseneck/dp/B001C06BLE/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1544105225&sr=8-2&keywords=scraping+card

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

8729 posts in 1442 days


#8 posted 12-06-2018 02:17 PM

Excellent idea ^

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Noel's profile

Noel

58 posts in 111 days


#9 posted 12-06-2018 02:19 PM

Yeah, that is a good idea, Dustin, and the card scrapers won’t break the bank. I appreciate all of the comments and helpful suggestions – glad I found this group!

-- Just make the cut

View Richard's profile

Richard

11233 posts in 3336 days


#10 posted 12-09-2018 01:17 AM



Noel, no photobucket account needed. Just upload pics directly using the img button.

This is a problem I have often when turning Walnut bowls. The endgrain always requires attention. I think a light skim cut in 2 directions is a good bet in your case. I ve also had luck with soaking the endgrain areas with BLO just before making finishing cuts. It seems to make the fibers more ameniable to being severed rather than tearing out. Also, make sure the bit you re using is clean and sharp.

Best of luck!

- HokieKen

I’d agree with this one!

Rick S.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com