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View jdh122's profile

stool leg angles

by jdh122
posted 12-05-2018 11:53 AM


9 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

540 posts in 1014 days


#1 posted 12-05-2018 01:31 PM

Looks to me like both angles are the same. Mock up something with scraps and pick some angles that look good to you. Matching someone else’s exact dimensions is highly over rated.

-- Sawdust Maker

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

9588 posts in 1533 days


#2 posted 12-05-2018 05:27 PM



Looks to me like both angles are the same. Mock up something with scraps and pick some angles that look good to you. Matching someone else s exact dimensions is highly over rated.

- LittleShaver

+1

I’d start around 15 degrees for both angles and just nail some scrap together and see how it looks. As far as stability, it depends on how big the seat is and how the legs are positioned on it. You just need to be sure the center of gravity of the person sitting in the stool can’t go outside where the legs meet the floor. So, the taller the stool, the wider the footprint needs to be.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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jdh122

1073 posts in 3212 days


#3 posted 12-06-2018 10:39 AM

Thanks for the advice, guess I’ll try mocking something up.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

241 posts in 1169 days


#4 posted 12-06-2018 02:09 PM

I always make sure the leg bottoms are at least as wide or a little wider than the top. Someone is bound to stand on it and if the legs are not as wide as the top it will tip.

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jdh122

1073 posts in 3212 days


#5 posted 12-06-2018 11:59 PM

Thanks Richard. I had noticed that the base always extends past the top, had much thought about the issue of standing on it, but it’s good to keep in mind.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

605 posts in 305 days


#6 posted 12-07-2018 04:02 AM

If you have a angle gauge for your table saw, you could use that gauge to calculate the angle. The stools I made for a client was 10 degrees, they specified the height and wanted two square & two round seats!

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jdh122

1073 posts in 3212 days


#7 posted 12-07-2018 11:18 AM

You mean mock up a scrap one and then use a Wixey digital gauge to get the angles? That could work.
I may get to this step this coming weekend. Right now I’m turning the 8 posts on my springpole lathe, takes a long time…

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1293 days


#8 posted 12-07-2018 03:01 PM

Sketchup,
Draw the base, draw the seat, connect the dots, measure the angle. easy peasy.
Take about 5-10 minutes at most.

However you do it, you need to know some fixed dimensions to start with.
Base size of legs (footprint)
Size of seat, and, How far you want to inset the legs from the edge of the seat
height of stool.
Once you have these the angles are pretty much a given.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1073 posts in 3212 days


#9 posted 12-07-2018 04:29 PM

THanks Jbay. For me, I think it’s simpler just to use high school trig once I have a mockup or a model that I like than it is to use Sketchup.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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