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View LizzyG's profile

Trying to identify this wood...would love some help from the experts here!

by LizzyG
posted 12-04-2018 05:35 PM


26 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16179 posts in 3096 days


#1 posted 12-04-2018 05:46 PM

That pic gives us a better idea of size than grain pattern or wood type. Maybe a closeup of face and end grain would help those that are good ID’ers of wood.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

598 posts in 381 days


#2 posted 12-04-2018 05:48 PM

The first clue may be the origin, which may be Michigan (or not). You do not know if it was first destined to move library furniture or something else. The northern tier of the Midwest has a lot of mixed hardwood forests. That said, I would guess hickory or maple. The photo doesn’t help.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6625 posts in 3672 days


#3 posted 12-04-2018 05:57 PM

To my way of thinking, it could be Pecan or Hickory…..But I don’t know anything about hardwoods up in Michigan.
If that’s where it came from…..possibly somewhere else…!!

-- " The secret to staying young looking.....hang around old people.." R.D.

View LizzyG's profile

LizzyG

6 posts in 286 days


#4 posted 12-04-2018 05:58 PM

Maybe these pics will show more of what will help identify it? I realize I sound clueless…that’s because I am. lol

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LizzyG

6 posts in 286 days


#5 posted 12-04-2018 05:58 PM

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LizzyG

6 posts in 286 days


#6 posted 12-04-2018 06:01 PM

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10738 posts in 1616 days


#7 posted 12-04-2018 06:02 PM

Looks like Pecan to me.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

229 posts in 475 days


#8 posted 12-04-2018 06:08 PM

That looks like Hickory to me. I had a Hickory tree fall in my yard and I harvested it. The outer wood has a lot of the dark spalting like what you have in that board. The end grain is the give-away. It is an open grain like oak but it’s harder and lighter colored. We mostly use it here in the south to smoke BBQ. And you can get some fine smoked meat off of it. But just pork not beef. Beef ain’t BBQ. Chicken is OK but pork is the best. Sorry y’all. I haven’t had lunch yet.

Just sayin’.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View LizzyG's profile

LizzyG

6 posts in 286 days


#9 posted 12-04-2018 06:10 PM



The first clue may be the origin, which may be Michigan (or not). You do not know if it was first destined to move library furniture or something else. The northern tier of the Midwest has a lot of mixed hardwood forests. That said, I would guess hickory or maple. The photo doesn t help.

- Phil32

I am almost certain the pallets are purchased directly from the manufacturer by the library furniture manufacturer. Because the furniture is primarily sold to schools, I feel confident there are regulations regarding where pallets can be sourced. I mentioned the pallets being so heavy to the factory owner when I saw him at our sales conference and he commented that because their furniture is so heavy, they buy solid oak pallets. I assumed it was oak until we started planing down the other boards…and that’s when I realized they were primarily red oak and I still had no idea what the pretty pieces were. I could ask him where he gets his pallets, but I don’t want to bother him with my DIY projects.
Thank you again! I really appreciate ya’ll taking time out of your day to help!

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

229 posts in 475 days


#10 posted 12-04-2018 06:15 PM

Could be white oak too. If you cut it with a power saw you will smell that putrid oak smell. Hickory and Pecan don’t do that.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View LizzyG's profile

LizzyG

6 posts in 286 days


#11 posted 12-04-2018 06:18 PM



That looks like Hickory to me. I had a Hickory tree fall in my yard and I harvested it. The outer wood has a lot of the dark spalting like what you have in that board. The end grain is the give-away. It is an open grain like oak but it s harder and lighter colored. We mostly use it here in the south to smoke BBQ. And you can get some fine smoked meat off of it. But just pork not beef. Beef ain t BBQ. Chicken is OK but pork is the best. Sorry y all. I haven t had lunch yet.

Just sayin .
- DBDesigns

Well that took an odd turn…now I’m hungry and you are obviously not from Texas, because they would disagree about beef not being BBQ! Personally…I…agree. I’m also not from Texas though. lol

I thought it kind of looked like hickory, but I guess I just didn’t expect pallets to be made of such a pretty wood. Of course, I also tend to prefer the wood that other people see as lower quality and only good for pallets. I like all the knots!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2825 posts in 1700 days


#12 posted 12-04-2018 09:25 PM

Ayup, Hickory. I recognize that end grain anywhere.

View EarlS's profile (online now)

EarlS

3029 posts in 2826 days


#13 posted 12-04-2018 09:31 PM

Yep – hickory

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

997 posts in 3561 days


#14 posted 12-04-2018 11:59 PM

Ayup and yep…Hickory.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 1964 days


#15 posted 12-05-2018 02:29 AM

By hickory they mean alder

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1748 posts in 1972 days


#16 posted 12-05-2018 06:57 AM

+1 vote for something from Hickory/Pecan family of woods.

Look for yourself on wood finder:
https://www.wood-database.com/wood-finder/

FWIW – That very dark coloration in board is likely damage artifact, not something you find in every single board from those species. If you are looking for the Hickory with similar stark contrast between light/dark, you may need to search for #2 common, knotty grade, or spalted lumber.

These Hickory slab images might help explain:
https://crlumber.com/store/catalog/product/gallery/id/1469/image/4049/
https://hoodfarmsandsawmill.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Hickory-.jpg

Here is spalted Hickory example:
https://www.northernspalting.com/spalting-info/edge-of-spalting/

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

960 posts in 1697 days


#17 posted 12-05-2018 11:15 AM

i worked in a pallet shop in michigan quite some time ago. when pallets had to be big and strong we used red oak and/or hickory for them.
alder never made it to pallets- i stole it all and used it to heat my house. DOH!!!

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1819 posts in 2954 days


#18 posted 12-05-2018 01:46 PM

Ayup and yep and yep too on hickory,

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1311 posts in 1386 days


#19 posted 12-05-2018 03:45 PM


alder never made it to pallets- i stole it all and used it to heat my house. DOH!!!

- tomsteve

Well, as everyone knows, Alder has more potential energy than Uranium-233 and Plutonium-239 and so makes for an excellent source of fuel. However, purposely burning Alder will assure you an afterlife of eternal fire. Have fun and bring some marshmallows.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 1964 days


#20 posted 12-05-2018 06:04 PM

I caution against burning alder as it can go supercritical

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2436 days


#21 posted 12-05-2018 07:12 PM



I caution against burning alder as it can go supercritical

- TheFridge

I bought a house with a single Alder log burning in the fireplace. 13-years later it is still on fire but it has not lost any size, color, or shape. There is no way to put it out either, which sucks in the summertime.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10738 posts in 1616 days


#22 posted 12-05-2018 07:25 PM

If you double-dog-dare it to go out, it’ll put itself out.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

960 posts in 1697 days


#23 posted 12-05-2018 09:45 PM

worked great at burnin any creosote buildup out of the chimney- and that was just a piece the size of my thumb.
never did find a wood that puts out the btu’s the way alder can. reminds me now of hearing about it in a movie:
“you smell that? alder,son.nothing else in the world smells like that. i love the smell of alder in the morning…that smell-ya know that alder smell. smells like….....victory.”


I caution against burning alder as it can go supercritical

- TheFridge


View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1377 days


#24 posted 12-05-2018 10:18 PM



worked great at burnin any creosote buildup out of the chimney- and that was just a piece the size of my thumb.
never did find a wood that puts out the btu s the way alder can.

- tomsteve

Exactly why I keep a small chunk in my survival backpack.
Put it right outside your tent and it will burn all night….... rain or snow.

Only problem, when you get up in the morning you have to scare away all the varmints that came during the night to stay warm too.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

960 posts in 1697 days


#25 posted 12-10-2018 08:19 PM


Exactly why I keep a small chunk in my survival backpack.
Put it right outside your tent and it will burn all night….... rain or snow.

Only problem, when you get up in the morning you have to scare away all the varmints that came during the night to stay warm too.

- jbay

put the ashes in the soil in yer ‘mater garden and you’ll have ‘maters that are out of this world.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1377 days


#26 posted 12-10-2018 08:47 PM

put the ashes in the soil in yer mater garden and you ll have maters that are out of this world.

- tomsteve

Then you would be growing “aldamaters” , you would have to slice them with a sawzall..

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