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View jamsomito's profile

My most expensive "tool" yet

by jamsomito
posted 12-03-2018 08:48 PM


8 replies so far

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

615 posts in 409 days


#1 posted 12-03-2018 09:59 PM

I had a similar subpanel at my former home – often necessary for the equipment we run even as hobbyists.
But, your title reminded me of my most expensive tool. First, let me explain that I’m a woodcarver, working almost exclusively with hand tools. My most expensive tool was a single gouge – a Pfeil #3-12mm gouge, priced about $22 at the time I bought it (2001). The expensive part was – - I bought it in Switzerland, at Hugglers Woodcarving Shop in Brienz. I’ll never do that again!

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Lee's profile

Lee

136 posts in 1384 days


#2 posted 12-03-2018 11:58 PM

LOL, ya, but you saved on shipping.

-- Colombia Custom Woodworking

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

615 posts in 409 days


#3 posted 12-05-2018 12:33 AM

Well, I also got to chat with their resident master woodcarver, a lovely young woman. The gouge has since been joined by about forty others of various sizes and shapes, acquired near home.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Andre's profile

Andre

2786 posts in 2312 days


#4 posted 12-05-2018 06:56 AM

Guess if we include shipping/travel my set of 2 Cherries from Lubeck and a 1/8” from Hamburg to complete the set would rank near the top! But then the 10 week course, 1200 KM from Home probable cost a lot more over all because of all the tools that followed! Come to think about it I also ended up putting a new sub panel in the workshop?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1233 posts in 3093 days


#5 posted 12-05-2018 07:30 AM

Too bad you did not have a friend that could have done that wiring upgrade for cost. I put in a separate 200A panel for the the cost of the wire and panel.

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

433 posts in 932 days


#6 posted 12-05-2018 12:39 PM



Too bad you did not have a friend that could have done that wiring upgrade for cost. I put in a separate 200A panel for the the cost of the wire and panel.

- Woodmaster1

lol, had I posted that, there would have been 2x as many comments telling me electricity can kill and it should only be installed by a licensed electrician and inspected by local code authority. I bought a book and looked up codes to do it myself originally, would have been about 30% the cost. In the end I just wanted it done, plus some CYA for home owners insurance. I try to err on the side of doing it “right”, especially with big upgrades like this. I have plans to run 3 more branch circuits myself in the future. 2×240v and another 120.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5714 posts in 3749 days


#7 posted 12-05-2018 09:25 PM

When I bought my present home with 8 acres, the first thing I did was to build a 1200 sf shop with a 200 amp power panel. I have enough power to run any machine, welder, compressor, etc singly or all at once. my son sometimes does welding while I’m using a 3 hp saw and DC, with lighting, air conditioning of heat running at the same time; never had a breaker trip. My shop is independent from the house and has it’s own electric power account, so I get hit with two electric bills every month.

BTW, I obtained the required permits, did the wiring myself (I’m not an electrician) and had it approved. My cost was for the panel and wire. I don’t think the cost was much more than $200. That was 15 years ago; might cost a bit more today.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2243 posts in 2535 days


#8 posted 12-05-2018 10:58 PM

I started off with my 2 car garage in similar boat: a single 15amp outlet and a single light bulb.
Pursued my own electrical installation with 60 amp subpanel and consequent 110v/220v plugs, with city inspection at the end.
Very rewarding.
And very much needed.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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