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View Andybb's profile

It might be time to try a Maloof style rocker

by Andybb
posted 12-03-2018 02:14 AM


27 replies so far

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1246 posts in 2081 days


#1 posted 12-03-2018 02:31 AM

Marc Spagnuolo (The Wood Whisperer) is doing a sale on the Sculpted Rocker right now (tonight’s the last night). Detailed video to walk you through from start to finish and links to Bellforest for the material if you don’t have it yet. The “plan” is expensive, but considering the details nature of the videos he and the other teachers do, it’s well worth it.
https://thewoodwhispererguild.com/

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2534 posts in 2340 days


#2 posted 12-03-2018 04:04 AM

If you really want to make a maloof rocker I suggest Walnut. It very stable if you get wood that’s nice and dry.
It’s important your parts hold their shape for the long haul.Its also very easy to grind file and sand.
Since it’s dark any small gaps will be harder to see unlike maple.
I really don’t like other so called woodworker making money off of Sams brilliant piece.
But I do feel it’s ok for one to challenge themselves for personal growth.
Good luck and maybe the grain be with you.:)

-- Aj

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

598 posts in 2913 days


#3 posted 12-03-2018 12:15 PM

Andybb:

Building an advanced rocker is a great journey – one that I strongly recommend. And, it is a process; not an event. The skills learned, the personal satisfaction, the end result are all world-class.

Several years ago, I chose to build a Hal Taylor rocker – to use his process, his build guide, and his website forum: these are excellent: along with much hard work on my part, Hal’s process was instrumental in getting me through the first several chairs; and, I use the learned skills and techniques in current work.

You Take Care.
MJCD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6497 posts in 2746 days


#4 posted 12-03-2018 12:55 PM

Walnut is Sam’s prefered timber, otherwise talk to Pottzy

-- Regards Rob

View torus's profile

torus

350 posts in 955 days


#5 posted 12-03-2018 12:59 PM

Did you see this project:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/404561

-- "It's getting better..." - put this on my RIP stone!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6597 posts in 1254 days


#6 posted 12-03-2018 02:51 PM

I would PM Pottzy and RedOak if I was to try one they both made very excellent chairs Pottsy seems to have a lot more pictures then redoak but redoak seems to have more info both excellent example’s take your time you will get it done :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Clarkswoodworking's profile

Clarkswoodworking

289 posts in 675 days


#7 posted 12-03-2018 04:03 PM

How dry

% wise

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1145 days


#8 posted 12-03-2018 04:46 PM


Walnut is Sam s prefered timber, otherwise talk to Pottzy

- robscastle


Are his helpers Ralph, Joanie and the Fonz?? :-)

Actually, thanks to Scott, we have plenty of locally grown and nicely figured walnut at our disposal and Scott’s new bandsaw mill to cut them, and I’m going to do soooo many nice things for him that he’ll donate them to the cause. ;-) There is real added satisfaction building stuff from local timber that I slabbed and milled myself.

So, a year for the slabs to dry??

This came from the same batch. Envisioning a bookmatched seat.

I am purposely trying to go against my ADHD / OCD personality to get this done. I’m usually the kind of guy who pays extra for expedited shipping so this is a form of therapy. Making plans a year out is just not my norm. Figure I can build a prototype out of pine in the meantime. That should also net me some templates.

Some great options for plans and classes in the replies. Thanks. Keep ‘em coming.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1145 days


#9 posted 12-03-2018 06:03 PM



I really don’t like other so called woodworker making money off of Sams brilliant piece.
- Aj2

No chance of that with me. No intention of selling something that I work on for over a year. I’d wanna die and be buried in that chair.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2534 posts in 2340 days


#10 posted 12-03-2018 06:40 PM

That’s awesome looking Walnut Andy. I live just down the street from the Maloofs so I’m very opinionated I don’t know why.
I’m more of a Krenov fan myself.

-- Aj

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1145 days


#11 posted 12-03-2018 06:50 PM



I’m more of a Krenov fan myself.
- Aj2

Cool. Never heard of Krenov until now. Just went to their site.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6497 posts in 2746 days


#12 posted 12-03-2018 07:40 PM

Heeeyyyy!!

-- Regards Rob

View Notw's profile

Notw

732 posts in 2295 days


#13 posted 12-03-2018 08:04 PM

seems like there used to be a list somewhere of all the tools “required” in building one of the Maloof rockers, but I can’t seem to find it now

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1145 days


#14 posted 12-03-2018 08:21 PM


seems like there used to be a list somewhere of all the tools “required” in building one of the Maloof rockers, but I can t seem to find it now

- Notw


Spagnolo lists them here. This will be handmade with power tools. I have no intention of scooping and planing the whole thing by hand. I think I have 90% of them. But like I said I figure this is at least a year away.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4239 posts in 2530 days


#15 posted 12-04-2018 12:06 AM

Both Hal Taylor and Bill Kappel have posted great videos of the chair making process. They are very useful to understanding the process and picking which to use as a basis of building a chair.

The instruction manuals for building by both guys are not very expensive. I purchased both and studied them before building a rocker.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1145 days


#16 posted 12-04-2018 12:25 AM



Both Hal Taylor and Bill Kappel have posted great videos of the chair making process.
- Redoak49

Hey, not to hijack my own thread but in this vid Hal has a pistol grip on a Bosch router. Where did that come from?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4153 posts in 1116 days


#17 posted 12-04-2018 01:00 AM

Here it is right here “Currently Unavailable” I think it has been for a while too. If you ever get to a woodworking/tool show where a Bosch rep is present ask them about it. Sometimes one is found in hiding.

Back when PC came out with their D it was great because the handles on the routers were so crappy. Bosch has had this, dropped it, and brought it back a few times if what I remember is correct. Their knob handed ear type handles are by far more comfy, and offer easier control. I’ve used both several times, and I prefer the ears.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2171 posts in 1145 days


#18 posted 12-04-2018 01:05 AM

Oh. I see. It’s not a base I can just slide my 1617 into. I got excited there for a minute. I’ve been looking for a D handle for my PC which is why the Bosch lives in the table.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4153 posts in 1116 days


#19 posted 12-04-2018 01:06 AM

Is Hal still selling “how to” plans, DVD’s and all? A few years ago he was talking about quitting.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4239 posts in 2530 days


#20 posted 12-04-2018 01:18 AM

I think Hal Taylor is still doing classes. Try a search for Rocking Chair University.

View Richard's profile

Richard

11307 posts in 3575 days


#21 posted 12-04-2018 01:46 AM

Good Luck! Enjoy Yourself!

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4239 posts in 2530 days


#22 posted 12-04-2018 12:08 PM

I am making plans for a second Maloof rocker and wondering what wood to use. If I had some of Andybb’s walnut, I would use it. The slab he showed is as pretty as the Claro Walnut I used.

I want something with a lot of character. Some type of figured maple but would like a darker wood. I also want a strong wood as I want to make the parts a bit more slender than my first rocker.

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

598 posts in 2913 days


#23 posted 12-04-2018 05:56 PM

Hal Taylor continues to sell both his Guide and his DVD; plus, as always, Hal remains a personal champion of those undertaking advanced woodworking. I met with Hal last year, and he’s as engaged as ever.

Within the last year, Hal updated his end-to-end rocker building process, and has already filmed a new DVD – whether these are available, I do not know. However, his existing DVD and Guide remain excellent.

Hal’s chair maximizes grain symmetry and grain flow; by design, all grain flows in a front-to-back direction (for example, the Headrest is not a single piece, with the grain forced to run side-to-side – rather, his Headrest is segmented, allowing the grain in each segment to run front-to-back (flowing from the seat)). His back braces are formed via bent-lamination, and flex both side-to-side and front-to-back: is process simplifies these advanced features. His approach to the ‘Maloof’ seat joints is quite simple and effective.

I’ve built 8 of his chairs, and they are beautiful.

MJCD

View pottz's profile

pottz

6732 posts in 1526 days


#24 posted 12-04-2018 08:23 PM

my ears were burning so ill chime in.i think you have the perfect mindset andy,dont rush it,enjoy the process,when i started i said the same thing to myself,if it takes a month or it takes a year,or two so be it.i only worked on it when i was totally in the mood,mine took about 6 months off and on.it was a great project and it pushed my skills in places i was weakest.as for wood i used the traditional walnut,but sam also did many in maple.i was in his shop one day,after his death,and the boys were in the final sanding of a rocker made from zircote,absolutely spectacular.just take your time and have fun,i sure did.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4153 posts in 1116 days


#25 posted 12-05-2018 11:05 PM



Hal Taylor continues to sell both his Guide and his DVD; plus, as always, Hal remains a personal champion of those undertaking advanced woodworking. I met with Hal last year, and he s as engaged as ever.

Within the last year, Hal updated his end-to-end rocker building process, and has already filmed a new DVD – whether these are available, I do not know. However, his existing DVD and Guide remain excellent.

Hal s chair maximizes grain symmetry and grain flow; by design, all grain flows in a front-to-back direction (for example, the Headrest is not a single piece, with the grain forced to run side-to-side – rather, his Headrest is segmented, allowing the grain in each segment to run front-to-back (flowing from the seat)). His back braces are formed via bent-lamination, and flex both side-to-side and front-to-back: is process simplifies these advanced features. His approach to the Maloof seat joints is quite simple and effective.

I ve built 8 of his chairs, and they are beautiful.

MJCD

- MJCD

That’s all great to hear. I met him a few years back, and then he said he was getting tired, and was thinking about just making a few chairs. I know I have heard his name a thousand times minimum with guys talking about tackling a Maloof style rocker. When guys like Hal leave today, there aren’t fill in players coming behind them that often, we are slowly losing our craft, to plastics, throw away’s, and those darn Walmart prices. With schools seldom offering Wood Shop to our kids, well I’m probably preaching to the choir.

-- Think safe, be safe

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4153 posts in 1116 days


#26 posted 12-05-2018 11:11 PM

Pottzy taking time to enjoy the journey is awesome advice, not just for chair builds, but any woodworking venture. I pity those guys making a living doing this, work work work, hardly any time to look at it from a different perspective. I had enough years of that grind, looking for the slower road now, much more enjoyable. Not to mention going breakneck you often don’t see the trouble until you’ve made a bunch of sawdust, that just isn’t going to become much more.

-- Think safe, be safe

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

598 posts in 2913 days


#27 posted 12-06-2018 01:13 AM

Sam Maloof inspired a generation of woodworkers; in the same, but different, way that Krenov and others have. Hal’s legacy is that he’s used his training materials, one-on-one tutoring, and heirloom-quality chairs to teach and pass along the craft to another generation. Hal has brought the art of chair making to the masses.

I tip my hat …

MJCD

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