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All Replies on Worksharp 3000 + MDF, why is my buffing compound blotchy?

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View 1tacoshort's profile

Worksharp 3000 + MDF, why is my buffing compound blotchy?

by 1tacoshort
posted 12-01-2018 07:18 PM


11 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2420 posts in 2274 days


#1 posted 12-01-2018 07:48 PM

Too me it looks very dry, when I had my Tormek I added 3 in 1 to the leather wheel to keep the compound moving and drying out.
Maybe try one section and see if it helps.

-- Aj

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 1962 days


#2 posted 12-01-2018 07:51 PM

I’d have used alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2413 posts in 3420 days


#3 posted 12-01-2018 08:48 PM

I’m betting a drop of oil would loosen it up and spread it.

I use a LOT of compounds on everything from an AirHandler buffing station to handheld buffers. Sometimes the dry gives just the touch up I need – on spiral buff wheels. However, I often just cup my hand, add a teaspoon of water and let the wheel run through it, which refreshes the compound and allows me to continue.

View 1tacoshort's profile

1tacoshort

45 posts in 1354 days


#4 posted 12-02-2018 05:59 AM

So, how does this work? Put a few drops of oil on the buffing compound, rub the oil/compound into a slurry, and spread that on the MDF wheel?

-- Wade

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2413 posts in 3420 days


#5 posted 12-03-2018 01:38 AM

Exactly.

Any non-hardening oil (e.g., motor or mineral) should work.

Remember, you must stay with the grit level you were using, or you can go more coarse, but you cannot, easily, go finer.


So, how does this work? Put a few drops of oil on the buffing compound, rub the oil/compound into a slurry, and spread that on the MDF wheel?

- 1tacoshort


View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1739 posts in 1970 days


#6 posted 12-03-2018 08:31 AM

Buffing compound usually has a wax carrier. Takes some friction and heat to soften and apply to buffing wheel.

If your MDF wheel is not creating enough friction (maybe due old/dry/hard compound, or too smooth surface), pass a propane torch over the end of compound stick for ~1 second before you apply to wheel. Note – Wax will catch fire and run everywhere if you add too much flame, so add heat slowly.

+1 Like Kelly, I use water (spray bottle) to freshen up old/dry buffing wheels.
Not sure I would recommend using water on MDF surface, nor would I use oil; as I fear using too much could create de-lamination of MDF. Waxes can be softened by turpentine or Stoddard solvent (100% hydrocarbon mineral spirits), and will evaporate; so light spray (or smear) with turpentine, followed by rubbing more compound on wheel, would be my suggestion to even things out.

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10728 posts in 1614 days


#7 posted 12-03-2018 02:44 PM

It does take a fair amount of heat to disperse those compounds. Between the MDF’s smooth face and the slow speed of the WS, there may simply not be enough friction to melt the binder in the compound. Might try shaving the compound into a jar and mixing in some mineral spirits or turpentine to soften the wax into a more pasty consistency.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10728 posts in 1614 days


#8 posted 12-03-2018 02:45 PM

And FWIW, I have the WS 3000 and the platens and abrasives made for it work very well for me.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2413 posts in 3420 days


#9 posted 12-04-2018 12:41 AM

I have several MDF type wheels with various compounds on them. So far, none have got even with me for getting oil on them.

Not sure I would recommend using water on MDF surface, nor would I use oil; as I fear using too much could create de-lamination of MDF. Waxes can be softened by turpentine or Stoddard solvent (100% hydrocarbon mineral spirits), and will evaporate; so light spray (or smear) with turpentine, followed by rubbing more compound on wheel, would be my suggestion to even things out.

Best Luck.

- CaptainKlutz


View richinva's profile

richinva

13 posts in 2975 days


#10 posted 12-04-2018 02:14 PM

”.... The grits described on the Enkay packaging say that the Brown Tripoli is coarser than the White Diamond.”

Tripoli IS coarser than White Diamond, not sure why anyone would reverse that.

You can also try a bit of iso alcohol to thin out the compounds. Just a spritz shouldn’t hurt your MDF. Then smear it around with your fingers.

View 1tacoshort's profile

1tacoshort

45 posts in 1354 days


#11 posted 12-04-2018 03:23 PM

Thanks, everybody! I’ll give those thoughts a try.

-- Wade

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