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View MSquared's profile

Good Beginners Carving Set Advice

by MSquared
posted 12-01-2018 05:51 AM


14 replies so far

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3901 posts in 1086 days


#1 posted 12-01-2018 06:47 AM

Carving is an all encompassing word. Just a few things come to mind, figures, and spoons and kitchen ware. Thing is they all use slightly different tools.

For just a starter set of knives I think Flexcut offers the best deal They may not be everyones favorite handle, but anyone could use them. Some brands are just not loveable, but some folks still like their feel. IF he likes carving he could grow the tools from there. I think they are project specific, and Lord only knows there are a bunch of variations, on handle, through blade.

If he might want to make a few spoons, Highland offers a nice starter kit.

You know him, if you think he is a little clumsy, or could get cut a chainmail carvers glove would round out either.

-- Think safe, be safe

View MyChipCarving's profile

MyChipCarving

646 posts in 3636 days


#2 posted 12-01-2018 01:14 PM

Hi Marty,
Good gift to introduce your son to woodcarving. I think it’s true with all styles of woodcarving, but especially with chip carving, technique is crucial! Learning proper technique is key when it comes to getting good results. Also, good technique leads to SAFE carving. Nothing discourages a beginner as much as a nasty cut.

Now time for my suggestion (at the risk of self-promotion :-), I’ve put together My Chip Carving Kits for any budget that helps beginners find success quickly. Each Kit has everything needed to get started along with free videos so he knows what to do and how to start! Many carvers say starting out by learning chip carving is a good move.

I like your gift idea as well as your first name!

I gotta show you the most recent Diamond Deluxe Chip Carving Knives I just finished. Bloodwood handles are sweet! :-)

-- Marty, https://www.MyChipCarving.com, 866-444-6996

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1452 posts in 3272 days


#3 posted 12-01-2018 05:06 PM

Good carving gouges can be expensive. Here are the best deals I have found from a reliable specialist wood carving source.

https://www.woodcarverssupply.com/STRAIGHT-HANDLE-6PC-SET-65/productinfo/540000/

https://www.woodcarverssupply.com/10-TOOL-BASIC-SET-ROLL/productinfo/401004/

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

632 posts in 415 days


#4 posted 12-01-2018 05:19 PM

Some Woodcraft stores currently have a 12-piece woodcarving set for $105.
However, I would advise against focussing on the tools. My interest (as a teenager) was started by a good book with photos or drawings of projects. I had a knife and three gouges. When I saw something I wanted to make the hobby took off. It is easy for beginners to get distracted by acquiring tools rather than carving.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View MSquared's profile

MSquared

726 posts in 426 days


#5 posted 12-02-2018 03:12 AM

Well folks, all of your replies are eye-opening, as expected, for sure. Marty, your carving sets are gorgeous! Obviously well crafted. Makes me want to start carving myself. However, I have a lot on my plate right now. SteveN, yes, it’s much more an encompassing world than I thought! Being a cook, the spoon carving looks appealing to me. Planeman, thanks for the info. Interesting site. Phil, I’m inclined to agree about the book first. It’s a lot to absorb. As it should be.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

1053 posts in 2441 days


#6 posted 12-03-2018 10:57 PM

THIS SET is reasonably priced and gets good reviews.

-- Quote from ebay tool listing: " Has nicks and dings wear and tear dust and dirt rust and pitting but in good working condition"

View MSquared's profile

MSquared

726 posts in 426 days


#7 posted 12-04-2018 12:35 AM

Thanks, Picklehead. Why do I trust a guy nicknamed ‘Picklehead’? Because he’s a fisherman!

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3901 posts in 1086 days


#8 posted 12-04-2018 12:42 AM


It is easy for beginners to get distracted by acquiring tools rather than carving.

- Phil32

Very true Phil, very true. As with any woodworking nothing beats actually doing it, learn skills while you grow your understanding, and with that understanding is a much better appreciation for what you need to keep moving forward. For some of us, it’s just more wood. For some it may be teaching, taking classes, and for others they just need a better kit. It’s almost impossible to know which it is for you, until you jump in.

-- Think safe, be safe

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117722 posts in 4089 days


#9 posted 12-04-2018 01:13 AM

Here’s a link to what Mary May the carving tools she suggests .she has an online carving class, that might be a good add-on to your son’s gift?

https://www.marymaycarving.com/carvingschool/all-about-tool-selection/

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1452 posts in 3272 days


#10 posted 12-04-2018 02:38 AM

”Why do I trust a guy nicknamed ‘Picklehead’? Because he’s a fisherman!”

Don’t you know fishermen are the biggest liars in the world? Haven’t you heard the term “fish story”? ;-)

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View MSquared's profile

MSquared

726 posts in 426 days


#11 posted 12-04-2018 03:12 AM

Yes, on both counts Planeman … I’m a fisherman.

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View MSquared's profile

MSquared

726 posts in 426 days


#12 posted 12-04-2018 04:01 AM

Hey Folks! You’ve all been very kind in sharing your experience, knowledge and craft. Great resources came forth as usual from LJ’ers! As for my situation, I’m sticking with keeping it simple with basic tools and a book as introductory guidance. Who knows? If he catches ‘the bug’ for carving, it’s a beautiful thing! Down the road, I’d be more than happy to contribute to his future pursuits. I do hope this thread continues for others who want to get into wood carving. Many thanks!

-- Marty, Long Island, NY

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3583 posts in 3620 days


#13 posted 12-04-2018 04:35 AM

One thing that I will note- if the tools are…inexpensive…there will be a fair amount of time spent on sharpening. I’d advise learning how to sharpen them really well. If and when newer, more expensive tools are purchased, that skill will be in place. And I can assure you that even experienced carvers that I know admit that they don’t really know how to sharpen their tools. Though what they really mean is “hone”. As the youngest guy in a class of people who have known each other for over 10 years, I hesitate to run a class, but I can sharpen stuff to give what a guy on line said, as he shaved his arm with a chisel, “This is what you call carver’s baldness!”.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117722 posts in 4089 days


#14 posted 12-04-2018 05:16 AM

Marty
I forgot to say is that the Mary May’s website has about 10 videos that are free that covers things like sharpening, what tools to start with, what kind of wood is best to carve, these videos are free so it may save you the need to buy a woodcarving book.

https://www.marymaycarving.com/carvingschool/

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