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View FrankD90's profile

Caulk or wood filler

by FrankD90
posted 12-01-2018 03:11 AM


15 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2265 posts in 2185 days


#1 posted 12-01-2018 03:48 AM

Ha my brothers name is Frank haven’t spoke to him in years. So my suggestion is to rip it out and start over.
And don’t use wood from the borg unless your framing a wall.
Find a local lumber yard and pic something suitable in the color you want so there’s no staining.
Ok

-- Aj

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2796 days


#2 posted 12-01-2018 03:55 AM

Did you glue the 2x’s together?

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View FrankD90's profile

FrankD90

4 posts in 199 days


#3 posted 12-01-2018 03:59 AM

We did not, we initially were going to use epoxy glass but opted out for cost. I just want to fill the seams with something waterproof and was wondering if caulk would adhere to polyurethane on the wood?

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2796 days


#4 posted 12-01-2018 05:14 AM



We did not, we initially were going to use epoxy glass but opted out for cost. I just want to fill the seams with something waterproof and was wondering if caulk would adhere to polyurethane on the wood?

- FrankD90

No, it will not stick. Neighbor tried this, results were I got asked to make new tabletop.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

2802 posts in 961 days


#5 posted 12-01-2018 06:29 AM

Yeah just abutting 2 or more pieces of BORG lumber (2 x material) you WILL get a lot of movement, flex, and it will become more unstable with age. Even if the budget says you need to use BORG wood, laying up layers of plywood would be more stable. On that you could Hammer veneer a hardwood of choice on top, and get the look, you would just need to place a banding of solid wood over the edges to hide the ply’s.

BORG 2x lumber will be drying, and moving on you for ages, so placing any kind of filler there will just loosen, and come loose.

You can do a glue up of 2 x material, but it will be best to joint down the edge, then cut the other edge on a TS to get rid of the rounded edge, then glue them up. With that you really need to use care affixing this to your base, wood movement will tear up your pine, unless you allow for the movement, so on your attachment you need to use figure 8’s or make some wooden cleats to attach so it’s anchored down, but given a way to move.

-- Think safe, be safe

View WoodshopTherapy's profile

WoodshopTherapy

52 posts in 491 days


#6 posted 12-01-2018 12:13 PM

In my opinion, replace the top and chalk it up to a learning experience. I’ve had success using plywood as a bar top and edging the plywood with “bar rail” on the front side and 1×3 stock on the back of the bar. Plywood is stable and it won’t warp if properly supported. For example, and L shaped bar can have a 45 degree corner on the top, but an overlapping layer below that to support and stabilize the structure.

-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge

View Eric's profile

Eric

79 posts in 260 days


#7 posted 12-01-2018 01:12 PM

Unfortunately i have to agree, chalk it up as a learning experience.

Wood will move as it dries, the best prevention it to use some type of cleat when attaching it to a frame. Use of a plywood substrate will help, but you can still get srinkage.

I have found that building a table top for yourself, let the material climatize to your home. My ex hated it but I would slide the planks under the couch for a few months. It is not a perfect cure, but it did reduce some of the movement. But also joint the edges prior to glue up.

Good luck

-- Eric, Upstate South Carolina

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

981 posts in 938 days


#8 posted 12-01-2018 04:19 PM

Well u could go back with wood over top of it (depending how it’s made) and make it look better that way. Could be done with plywood or use tile or actual kitchen counter top.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View FrankD90's profile

FrankD90

4 posts in 199 days


#9 posted 12-02-2018 03:11 AM

View FrankD90's profile

FrankD90

4 posts in 199 days


#10 posted 12-02-2018 03:11 AM

Here’s why I cannot tear it all apart. I’m thinking I may inlay some wood to fill the gap.

Frank

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2796 days


#11 posted 12-02-2018 04:04 AM



Here s why I cannot tear it all apart. I m thinking I may inlay some wood to fill the gap.

Frank

- FrankD90

This will bring you back to a repeat of the problem to begin with. The wood you made it out of moves. You would need to route a channel deep enough and wide enough to put a inlay, with another kind of wood. Neither will move at same rate. In short time you will be back to square one.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5249 posts in 1371 days


#12 posted 12-02-2018 04:09 AM

abort abort will robinson abandon the ship,self destruct mode is now in progress!!!.seriously rip it out at whatever the cost,it wont get better,sorry I wish I could say something more positive.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Chrisoferguson's profile

Chrisoferguson

1 post in 198 days


#13 posted 12-02-2018 06:01 AM

One of the earlier post nailed it.Framing lumber is only dried to roughly 19 percent mc,so it was going to shrink dramatically,hence the large gap.It should be 6-8 percent to use indoors,so in the future ,dry to appropriate mc,edge boards,glue up & anchor top so boards can move.Anything you do to patch has it’s risk.If money is an issue pull boards back up,lightly plane,edge,check moisture content,glue up & anchor appropriately.

View clin's profile

clin

1030 posts in 1383 days


#14 posted 12-02-2018 07:05 PM

While I agree with all that has been said about problems using construction grade wood for furniture, caulks is cheap. In this case, get a dark colored caulk and give it a go. Might work fine, and last years, might not stick at all and you’re no worse off. Though I might try a small bit of the caulk first. Just to see if it sticks after it cures.

-- Clin

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1873 days


#15 posted 12-02-2018 07:20 PM

Well. If you’re gonna try it. I’d use acetone to clean the seams. It’ll probably hold pretty good until the wood shrinks and the caulk gets hard enough for the seams to split.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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