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Making and Using Your Own Buffing Compounds

by Kelly
posted 11-30-2018 04:56 PM


10 replies so far

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3886 posts in 1083 days


#1 posted 12-06-2018 10:34 AM

Interesting read, thanks for the effort to put it together.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Abter's profile

Abter

75 posts in 1136 days


#2 posted 05-15-2019 04:14 PM

Thanks! Good explanation! Like you I always suspect a lot of expensive products can be made at home with very inexpensive ingredients.
A comment and a question.

Comment:

you can buy high quality beeswax in a variety of places. For example, Candle makers, food canners and some folks who make-their-own soaps & cosmetics often use beeswax. Places that sell local or raw honey also usually sell beeswax. I just looked on Amazon and you can buy 1 pound of cosmetic grade beeswax for ~$10. Many craft stores (e.g. AC Moore and Michaels) sell 1 lb pure beeswax for $9. For me a pound of beeswax would be waaaaaaay more than a lifetime supply of beeswax for making buffing compounds. You can buy smaller quantities of high grade beeswax for about $1/ounce. Wood working stores sell it also…for a weeee bit more. Rockler has 200 grams (0.44 pounds) for $30.

Question

Can you adjust the “grit” (fineness??) of the compound? For example Tripoli bars are a coarser ‘grit’ than white bars. Does DIATOMACEOUS EARTH or pumice come in different grain sizes?? Would using more or less of these in your blend achieve the same purpose?

-- "Many men fish all their lives without ever realizing that it is not the fish they are after." {often mis-quoted as by H.D. Thoreau}

View SMP's profile

SMP

1392 posts in 414 days


#3 posted 05-15-2019 04:37 PM



Thanks! Good explanation! Like you I always suspect a lot of expensive products can be made at home with very inexpensive ingredients.
A comment and a question.

Comment:

you can buy high quality beeswax in a variety of places. For example, Candle makers, food canners and some folks who make-their-own soaps & cosmetics often use beeswax. Places that sell local or raw honey also usually sell beeswax. I just looked on Amazon and you can buy 1 pound of cosmetic grade beeswax for ~$10. Many craft stores (e.g. AC Moore and Michaels) sell 1 lb pure beeswax for $9. For me a pound of beeswax would be waaaaaaay more than a lifetime supply of beeswax for making buffing compounds. You can buy smaller quantities of high grade beeswax for about $1/ounce. Wood working stores sell it also…for a weeee bit more. Rockler has 200 grams (0.44 pounds) for $30.

Question

Can you adjust the “grit” (fineness??) of the compound? For example Tripoli bars are a coarser grit than white bars. Does DIATOMACEOUS EARTH or pumice come in different grain sizes?? Would using more or less of these in your blend achieve the same purpose?

- Abter

I know Behlen makes pumice in a fine and coarse, as well as rottenstone. I’m sure you can get some cheaper brands on amazon for this purpose.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2428 posts in 3453 days


#4 posted 05-15-2019 04:44 PM

Just by switching to BonAmi, pumice, rottenstone or other powder, you’ll be able to tweek the grit. Pumice would be more aggressive, I believe.

I haven’t asked about the different mesh (grit) grades of diatomaceous, and have never heard anything about it. I get mine from a friend, who drops off a 40# bag, when I need it.

NOTE: The stuff I get is the raw stuff. It’s what is put on animal feed or used in a garden. The version used for swimming pools and other filter systems has been heated to around a 2,000 degrees, which crystallizes it, and which makes it deadly for consumption by man or animal.

I have fallen in the habit of ding a final sand with 320, though I’ve gotten away with 150. Then I use the diatomaceous. That brings them to a high shine, BUT I still touch up with the buffer, which seems to make the good end result even better. To be fair, my buffer is handy, has lighting and has a filter system (which is a must, since the filters get really loaded with dust and string).

I have a jar of rottenstone I go to when I want a bit darker result, as you’d get when the darker wax fills the pores during buffing.

Anyway, I’ll try to run a few test runs today and report back with the results of using different things, specifically.

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Delete

439 posts in 881 days


#5 posted 05-15-2019 11:46 PM

Nicely written and very resourceful article. I have a head start on materials, I keep lots of “Diatomacious Earth” around to deal with the ants on the ant hill I live on.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2428 posts in 3453 days


#6 posted 05-16-2019 12:21 AM

Thanks, Carlos.

I took a few minutes out and buffed with rottenstone. I got a better finish with the diatomaceous earth, and it doesn’t leave the pores clogged with dark wax. Had a project going, so didn’t get to the stainless shines.

For those unaware, McGuires mag polish does a nice job on acrylics and such.

I need to get some fieldspar powder to test drive that, just cause.

I have several pounds of zeolite and it would be interesting to see how that plays.

In the end, everything is fair game for experimentation:

Flour
Cornstarch
Zeolite
Fieldspar
Pumice
Diatomaceous earth
Mag polish
Plastic polish
Bar Keepers Friend / Bon Ami / Cameo
. . .

View SMP's profile

SMP

1392 posts in 414 days


#7 posted 05-16-2019 01:01 AM

While you are at it, you can also try getting water spots off glass. I think i found the fine diatomaceous powder worked well on glass. The stuff i had was for reef fish tank filters.

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OSU55

2404 posts in 2498 days


#8 posted 05-16-2019 04:25 PM

Kelly you might want to make this a blog entry for easier reference.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8768 posts in 3086 days


#9 posted 05-16-2019 05:08 PM

Excellent ideas thank you Kelly!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2428 posts in 3453 days


#10 posted 05-16-2019 05:36 PM

Thanks for the tip. When I get done goofing off…..


Excellent ideas thank you Kelly!

- waho6o9


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