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View CecilD's profile

HVLP Sprayer

by CecilD
posted 11-29-2018 03:03 AM


8 replies so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

4473 posts in 974 days


#1 posted 11-29-2018 06:23 PM

What finishes do you plan on spraying?

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View chrisb89's profile

chrisb89

13 posts in 1107 days


#2 posted 11-29-2018 07:07 PM

I bought a Sprayfine A301 3-Stage Turbine HVLP Spray System about 2 years ago and it works great. It’s not a name brand so I think it is cheaper in price but defiantly not in quality. Go to TurbineProducts.com and look. I think it is a small company in the NE. The guy I talked to was VERY knowledgable about HVLP. I love it. I can put on 3-4 coats of clear in a day and still sand in between.

-- ChrisB

View Rich's profile

Rich

4473 posts in 974 days


#3 posted 11-29-2018 07:26 PM


I bought a Sprayfine A301 3-Stage Turbine HVLP Spray System about 2 years ago and it works great. It s not a name brand so I think it is cheaper in price but defiantly not in quality. Go to TurbineProducts.com and look. I think it is a small company in the NE. The guy I talked to was VERY knowledgable about HVLP. I love it. I can put on 3-4 coats of clear in a day and still sand in between.

- chrisb89

I have a Sprayfine gravity feed gun and did a review of it here. It’s a reputable company and the owner, Phil, gives great customer support. I can’t speak for the turbine itself since I have a Fuji Q4 that I bought 15 or 20 years ago. However, I suspect that it’s a quality item based on my experience with the gun.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View CecilD's profile

CecilD

60 posts in 3812 days


#4 posted 11-29-2018 08:44 PM

I plan on using both solvent & water base. But I do mostly lacquers at present

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

589 posts in 2756 days


#5 posted 11-30-2018 01:23 AM

Cecil:

IMO… a 5-stage is for those individuals spraying latex paint, and other very high viscose materials. Look at the amperage difference between a 4 & 5 stage… it might be a full ampere (1 amp out of 10)... not a great difference in power, but they’ll get you for buying the latest and greatest. Also, solvent and water-based (water-borne) finishes don’t require tremendous power. I spray Deft water-borne acrylic and water-borne polyurethane with my 4-stage Fuji, and it works smoothly.

Having said this, it is not the number of stages; just as ‘horsepower’ ratings are misleading. Look at the motor amperage; look at the quality of the manufacturer… motors across manufacturers are not created equally. A good portion of the extra that you will pay more for a Fuji or an Apollo is because of the motor.

Just my opinion.
MJCD

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2288 posts in 3329 days


#6 posted 11-30-2018 04:30 PM

I have a four stage CapSprayer I’ve been using for many years now and I think it’s the cat’s meow. I’ve sprayed poly, oil paint and a lot of latex. I even shot lacquer on a buddy’s John Deere with it.

Where the beast shinned was at the gun. It was so adjustable, I was able to paint stair railing and balusters with it in a fraction of the time it would have taken to brush and roll them. Of course, thanks to the approximate 8 PSI at the tip, it was nothing like using my SprayTech airless, which would have put a gallon of finish in the air.

To thin latex for shooting from my gun, I ran the larger tip, for the thicker solids, and I added a couple tablespoons of water to the paint. In other words, even with a four stage, it didn’t take much to be able to shoot latex, so a five stage should be even more impressive.

I hear great things about the Apollos over the years and if I were buying again, would probably have gone that route, but only because of the ability to adjust air flow at the turbines. I am ASSUMING this would make dealing with a range of finishes easier, especially if the unit were a five or six stage. However, I, also, am ASSUMING much of the needed control can be done at the gun, both via the controls and a change of tip needle and such.

Anyway, having the capability of doing more, even if you don’t, seems a good thing on a major investment like this.

When you do invest, buy a couple tips. One for light materials like lacquer and one for heavier materials like latex. Too, buy extra check valves or whatever your gun needs. Mine use little, simplistic and easily cleaned valves in the bleeder hose and if it can’t be cleaned, a replacement is a must to keep going. Needles and such should last Joe Average nearly forever and a day, if kept clean and handled carefully.

One other thing REALLY worth considering, but which would add a little to the matter of clean up, is a remote quart tank. This would leave you with only the bulky hose and gun for cabinet work, rather than the gun, hose and quart tank, which can be hard to fit in some cabinets.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2288 posts in 3329 days


#7 posted 11-30-2018 04:34 PM

P.S. I also have a Accusprayer. It’s a monster (big paint pot) and, on a whim, I’ve painted entire rooms with it. I love the gun, but it remains it’s a conversion unit all wrapped up in a nice package. I’m going to sell it because my airless and turbine units handle 99% of what I need done these days.

It shines when I need to run a gallon of finish, such as if I were doing a fence or large stair railing and didn’t want to fill the little gun many times.

View CecilD's profile

CecilD

60 posts in 3812 days


#8 posted 12-01-2018 09:52 PM

Thanks everyone for your suggestions.

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