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Panel construction

by Sludgeguy
posted 11-25-2018 11:41 PM


11 replies so far

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

582 posts in 272 days


#1 posted 11-25-2018 11:59 PM

When I build my panels I’ll plane rails & stiles to 3/4” thickness, and cut my slots center at 3/8”w & 3/8” depth. My panels are also planed to 3/4” thickness. I use the router table to cut the rails, stiles & panels. The inside of the panels are flush with the rails & stiles. The way you do it is a matter of your preference.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2747 posts in 3244 days


#2 posted 11-26-2018 12:27 AM

Doesn’t really matter how you do it, other than aesthetics. I’ve done both. If you’re not sure what you’d like, do a small mock-up with scrap wood.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

56 posts in 484 days


#3 posted 11-26-2018 12:32 AM

Thanks guys. If I use option 2 (rabbets) I think I’ll end up with small gaps between the shoulder of the rabbet and the rail or stile. It that a legitimate concern?
Thanks again.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3031 posts in 2386 days


#4 posted 11-26-2018 12:48 AM

I’m wondering why you need such thick panels. Plywood panels need be no more than 1/4” thick. Of course I’m thinking of a nice hardwood ply, not fir or pine. I guess if you’re using solid wood, though, you’d need to go thicker.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5234 posts in 2670 days


#5 posted 11-26-2018 12:49 AM

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

56 posts in 484 days


#6 posted 11-26-2018 12:17 PM

Thanks for turning the photo. This is a recurring problem for me.

View jmos's profile

jmos

913 posts in 2731 days


#7 posted 11-26-2018 01:04 PM

As far as the gaps from the rabbets go, put them on the inside of the cabinet so they won’t be seen. Cut the rabbets deeper than you need, let the gap be there, and hide it inside. That way you don’t have to worry about being so precise in cutting them so that they are no gaps, but don’t hold the joints in the frame from closing up.

I also agree with comments above that 3/4” panels are overkill. 3/8” would be plenty. As suggested, cut a 3/8” grove in the frame and drop in the panels. Then you don’t have any rabbets or gaps to worry about. The 3/4 panels will add weight, but not much strength. If the panels were really large, or you expected someone to be leaning against them or kicking them, maybe the thickness would be needed, but for this I wouldn’t bother.

Another good option is veneered panels. Use MDF or plywood base and veneer with something expensive.

-- John

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

56 posts in 484 days


#8 posted 11-26-2018 02:26 PM

Thanks for your help John. The frame is made out of live oak and my wife would like the panels to match the frame; hence I’m kind of stuck with solid panels.. I thought about veneering plywood with live oak, but my band saw isn’t up to the task of cutting veneer.

I think your advise is to implement “Option 1” only with 3/8” panels. Correct?

Once again, thanks for your help.

View jmos's profile

jmos

913 posts in 2731 days


#9 posted 11-26-2018 09:50 PM

Yes, option 1 with 3/8” panels would work well. You can center the panels, or offset them, depending on how you want it to look.

If your stock is truly 4/4, you may be able to resaw it in half and get two panels from each. I’d do a test piece to see how it reacts to resawing (that it doesn’t cup or twist) but it’s a good was to save on stock.

-- John

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

56 posts in 484 days


#10 posted 11-27-2018 02:48 AM

The stock is from a local sawmill that “rescues” wood from land clearing operations and hurricane damage. I glued up “scraps” to make the 10”x 14” panels. They are a shade under 3/4”. I was thinking of planing them a little every 2 or 3 day until I reach the desired thickness. This would let the wood move in stages with the end result, hopefully, being a flat and stable panel. Am I pushing rope up a hill? I can switch to white oak plywood for the panels but the customer (wife) really likes the look of the live oak. I have to admit the grain patterns are pretty nice.
I appreciate everyone’s help.

View EdDantes's profile

EdDantes

62 posts in 272 days


#11 posted 11-27-2018 05:35 PM



The stock is from a local sawmill that “rescues” wood from land clearing operations and hurricane damage. I glued up “scraps” to make the 10”x 14” panels. They are a shade under 3/4”. I was thinking of planing them a little every 2 or 3 day until I reach the desired thickness. This would let the wood move in stages with the end result, hopefully, being a flat and stable panel. Am I pushing rope up a hill? I can switch to white oak plywood for the panels but the customer (wife) really likes the look of the live oak. I have to admit the grain patterns are pretty nice.
I appreciate everyone s help.

- Sludgeguy

I’d say it’s worth a try. I glued up similar size panels out of 1/2” Spanish cedar (re-sawed from 4/4) for humidors and planed them down to 1/4” and I’ve had no problems. I didn’t worry about planing over the course of a few days. Not sure whether that was right or not, but it didn’t cause an issue. I can’t imagine you’d see much cupping/twisting over such a small panel. And I suspect any small amount of deflection will be addressed by being held in the rails/stiles. Just have to be extra cautious about your glue lines, making sure it’s evenly spread over the entire surface and you don’t get too much squeeze-out as to create voids. Miss a 1/4” in a spot on a 3/4” panel and it’s probably not an issue. But if that void is included in your final 3/8” panel it could be a problem.

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