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View awsum55's profile

Drum Sander ?

by awsum55
posted 11-24-2018 08:10 PM


12 replies so far

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

830 posts in 473 days


#1 posted 11-24-2018 08:42 PM

For this price, it’s well worth it. This would save on sanding time. with good results for a flat sanded surface. I would also get the table extensions also.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4274 posts in 2551 days


#2 posted 11-24-2018 08:52 PM

I have the Supermax 16/32 and really like it. It is solidly built and works great. It takes a bit of time to set up and earn to use.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6548 posts in 2766 days


#3 posted 11-25-2018 10:47 AM

Buy it.
You certainly will not regret it.

I have one similar and when it comes to sanding its impressive.

-- Regards Rob

View turnkey47's profile

turnkey47

310 posts in 3254 days


#4 posted 11-25-2018 12:07 PM

i have the supermax 16-32..i use it all the time..i upgraded from a jet 10-20..got mine from woodcraft!!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5837 posts in 3055 days


#5 posted 11-25-2018 12:20 PM

Quite some eyars ago I bought a Delta DS from a friend at a really good price, even though I had no idea what I would use it for. Over the years it became a heavily used tool as I learned just how useful it was. I sold it maybe 5 years ago and recently realized how much I missed having one…so I bought a Supermax. It’s like being reunited with an old friend. Do be aware, you need a really good DC system to capture the dust, these things produce mountains of very fine dust. Also, my experience says these are not finish sanding machines. They do leave scratches that you will have to remove with an ROS or whatever your choice is. I had nothign but problems sanding on the DS with anything finer than 150, so I quit buying the fine grit belts and don’t run any soft wood through it. The belts are too expensive to just clog up and throw away.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3066 posts in 1784 days


#6 posted 11-25-2018 03:33 PM

I have an older Performax 16/32 and every so often I wish it was wider, but for 99% of my uses it is perfect.

Fred is spot on about the finer grits, however I tend to use 220 grit as my final pass on hardwoods and with care (no more than 1/8 turn, 1/128”) the belts last for quite some time.

Probably the best thing about a DS (for me at least) is the ability to dial in a dimension to within a few thousandths of an inch.

The extension tables are basically a must have (again in my opinion), but the price is quite out of line as they run more than 10% the cost of my machine for simple stamped metal parts. I made my own extensions out of rollers which work quite well, but of course the time to build certainly cancelled out the $100 savings.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1386 posts in 2514 days


#7 posted 11-25-2018 04:01 PM

+1 on not using fine grits. As far as clogging belts, get one of the “giant rubber eraser” things to clean the belt. A few light passes back and forth on the spinning drum will clean the paper quite well. Just be certain to follow up with a stiff brush on the drum (stop the machine first) and the feed belt to remove the rubber nubs. They will cause burn marks if you leave them in place.

Avoid the temptation to use your hand held shop broom on the spinning drum. The heat generated can melt the bristles. Don’t ask me how I know that.

View awsum55's profile

awsum55

716 posts in 1071 days


#8 posted 11-26-2018 01:11 AM

Thanks for the replies. It looks like you all like yours and have no regrets. I did read that the finer grits don’t last as long, and that you have to be a little more careful with how much wood you try to remove in one pass with any grit.

I find no matter how hard I try, I’m never able to get all pieces of a project the same thickness after resewing them when the wood I’m using can’t go through my planer, either because it is too short or because the grain is crazy. This is probably my biggest reason for wanting a drum sander.

Every so often I might glue up a box top that isn’t quite flat and I wish I had a drum sander thinking I could remove the twist like you would with a planer. It seems possible to me that if I were to use a flat piece of MDF and hot glue a shim and the box top to the MDF so it can’t move, I should be able to send it through the sander to flatten one side and then turn it over and do the other side, or just the side that matters.

Does that make sense? Have any of you tried something like that?

-- John D, OP, KS

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5837 posts in 3055 days


#9 posted 11-26-2018 11:32 AM

I haven’t tried that, but there’s no reason it won’t work. But drum sanders remove so little on each pass, it may take most of the day depending on the work piece.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View sras's profile

sras

5257 posts in 3691 days


#10 posted 11-26-2018 02:52 PM

I use a small piece of carpet tape and have had good luck. The only time I use a fine grit is if I want to do a clean up pass before final sanding.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3066 posts in 1784 days


#11 posted 11-26-2018 04:34 PM


Every so often I might glue up a box top that isn t quite flat and I wish I had a drum sander thinking I could remove the twist like you would with a planer. It seems possible to me that if I were to use a flat piece of MDF and hot glue a shim and the box top to the MDF so it can t move, I should be able to send it through the sander to flatten one side and then turn it over and do the other side, or just the side that matters.

Does that make sense? Have any of you tried something like that?

- awsum55

I do that all the time. I have a 3/4 MDF sled with a short stop attached to the rear. I’ll rock a twisted piece until I feel it is level, then slide in some shims to steady it. Once the top is flat enough I’ll flip it and flatten the bottom.

A good method to recover belts with burns or other build up is a soak in ammonia overnight and give it a good hose down. The crud usually comes off easily and the belt is like new.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

604 posts in 2294 days


#12 posted 11-27-2018 05:02 PM

I have the Supermax 19-38 and I like it. I use it in many projects that I make. It’s not a replacement for my random orbit sander. Without it, I’m not sure how I could sand (perfectly flat) the 1/8” thick shop-sawn veneer that I use. It’s really good for figured wood or wood that chips and tears out frequently. It’s slow—but very good for dimensioning wood to an exact thickness

I have sandpaper rolls from 80 grit to 220 grit. I almost never go above 150. I would say 80 or 100 grit is what I use typically.

Those rubber sticks for cleaning sandpaper work to help clean the sandpaper rolls. I would suggest using it with the drum turned off. When I use with the drum turned on I just end up getting a bunch of rubber bits all over the inside of the drum lid. If you ever “ruin” a sanding roll by getting pitch, glue, or something else clogging the sandpaper—try removing the belt and soaking it in Simple green over night. Scrub it with a little brush after the soaking. This has worked well for me.

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