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View ScottKaye's profile

Filling tiny defects in a cutting board with epoxy

by ScottKaye
posted 11-20-2018 11:18 PM


19 replies so far

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

565 posts in 590 days


#1 posted 11-20-2018 11:23 PM

should look just fine, sand and oil

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

764 posts in 2341 days


#2 posted 11-20-2018 11:28 PM

y


should look just fine, sand and oil

- Knockonit

you’re saying ignore them and go about the finishing process? Shouldnt I be concerned about bacteria getting trapped in those cracks?

Scott

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

7387 posts in 2587 days


#3 posted 11-20-2018 11:32 PM

I’d leave it alone as well… epoxy would make them stand out even more.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Snowbeast's profile

Snowbeast

101 posts in 1726 days


#4 posted 11-20-2018 11:45 PM

Pack them full of walnut sanding dust, drizzle with thin CA and then sand flush. Will look just like a solid knot in the wood. No chance of anything getting stuck in the hole.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5278 posts in 2697 days


#5 posted 11-20-2018 11:59 PM

The tried and true way is
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Try it on a piece of scrap walnut.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2266 posts in 2186 days


#6 posted 11-21-2018 12:58 AM

I’d rather eat more bacteria then epoxy.
leave it but pack some salt in there to bring out the flavors of the bacteria :)

-- Aj

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

694 posts in 1490 days


#7 posted 11-21-2018 02:19 AM

5 minute epoxy should work just fine. I use it all the time for small chip-outs and small defects like yours. You can use it clear or add a very small amount of walnut sanding dust for color. Experiment a little. More than a small amount will make it too dark. While it sets up in about 5 minutes, let it cure for 8 hours or so before sanding.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3687 days


#8 posted 11-21-2018 04:06 AM

I’d have no problem filling it with either sawdust and CA glue or epoxy. Both would end up looking fine.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4478 posts in 977 days


#9 posted 11-21-2018 04:26 AM

If you are going to try to fill it, use epoxy putty. It will have a softer sheen than regular two-part. Also, do follow AlaskaGuy’s advice and test it first. From the looks of those defects, you might have to dig into them a bit in order for the epoxy to have something to grip

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2266 posts in 2186 days


#10 posted 11-21-2018 05:37 AM

After looking at your photo a second time Scotty the small inclusions don’t really matter.
You have long grain mixed in with end grain. The project is doomed to fail
All the grain needs to run in the same direction esp with a cutting board because it will cycle from wet to dry.
No fooling Mother Nature

-- Aj

View Rich's profile

Rich

4478 posts in 977 days


#11 posted 11-21-2018 05:54 AM


You have long grain mixed in with end grain. The project is doomed to fail

- Aj2

It all looks like end grain to me.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1874 days


#12 posted 11-21-2018 06:17 AM

If it fails. It’s because you didn’t use alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4478 posts in 977 days


#13 posted 11-21-2018 08:50 AM


If it fails. It’s because you didn’t use alder.

- TheFridge

Alder dulls the knife on the first slice.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

216 posts in 1244 days


#14 posted 11-21-2018 11:47 AM

Does look like end grain walnut with long-grained maple?

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2790 posts in 2736 days


#15 posted 11-21-2018 01:00 PM

Epoxy will fill the hole, but it will be very noticeable. I’d go for the sawdust and glue or else buy a tube of walnut wood filler at the BBS. Basically, it’s the same thing.

I just filled a bunch of larger holes in a walnut project with a 2 part wood filler epoxy and you can see every one of them. Fortunately, it will be stained ebony the epoxy will take a stain.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

764 posts in 2341 days


#16 posted 11-21-2018 02:55 PM



After looking at your photo a second time Scotty the small inclusions don’t really matter.
You have long grain mixed in with end grain. The project is doomed to fail
All the grain needs to run in the same direction esp with a cutting board because it will cycle from wet to dry.
No fooling Mother Nature

- Aj2

I guarantee you, It’s all End Grain. Walnut and Maple including the long runs of maple strips

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

764 posts in 2341 days


#17 posted 11-21-2018 02:59 PM

After reading everyone suggestions I’m going to try it with Titebond and sawdust as well as Thin CA and sawdust in a piece of scrap walnut (as Alaska guy suggested) and then finish both repairs with mineral oil.

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1396 posts in 3237 days


#18 posted 11-21-2018 03:16 PM

Discussed many times, but wooden cutting boards won’t provide the proper enviroment to promote the growth of bacteria/ pathogens. If the defect is small yet still clean”able” its of little concern in the aspect of food safety, yet the woodworker in me would also be looking to correct/patch the defect TOO!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

9499 posts in 1526 days


#19 posted 11-21-2018 03:30 PM

I think any of the suggestions will work fine and that trying it on scrap first is always the right approach. Mostly I just wanted to say that is one cool friggin’ cutting board!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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