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View Bama8's profile

Dining Table Top Design

by Bama8
posted 11-16-2018 05:28 PM


12 replies so far

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

538 posts in 289 days


#1 posted 11-16-2018 06:03 PM

If the boards are too thin to be used for the 90” length, are they also too thin for making the mortise joints in the middle? What is the actual thickness of the boards?

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2261 posts in 2183 days


#2 posted 11-16-2018 06:16 PM

I think it will be fine, most would consider getting longer boards because it’s a heck of lots more work. It also breaks up the look of having one long table with flowing grain.
Kinda has the look of two small tables but that’s just me.

-- Aj

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1285 days


#3 posted 11-16-2018 06:31 PM

You can but the center will be a weak spot.
Are you using a skirt/apron?
A good size apron or trestle will help.
What is your base design?

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5398 posts in 2737 days


#4 posted 11-16-2018 06:40 PM

Not enough information, how thick are the boards? How are you planning on supporting the table? When designing a table start with the legs and then work up from there, the top is last.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View SMP's profile

SMP

1014 posts in 291 days


#5 posted 11-16-2018 07:03 PM

It might make more sense to use hardware and build it like a center leaf style table.

View Bama8's profile

Bama8

4 posts in 1276 days


#6 posted 11-16-2018 07:04 PM

I have boards that are 1” or thicker rough cut that would be fine if I go with the shorter lengths because of a board in the middle.

Planning on making the support similar to Jay’s dining table build.
https://jayscustomcreations.com/2016/04/how-to-build-a-dining-table/

I laminated boards together and made legs for this. Ok, it was mostly my dad who is 1000X better than I am.

View Bama8's profile

Bama8

4 posts in 1276 days


#7 posted 11-19-2018 03:03 PM

In the interest of looks and a lot less work, I think I am going to scrap the idea and go with boards running the length of the table. It will turn out around 3/4” thick or a little less, which will look too thin with the legs I’m using. So the plan is now to glue boards under the outside boards of the long edge and make a thick breadboard to make the table appear thicker. I’ve searched and there are a few other threads where guys have done this.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2344 days


#8 posted 11-19-2018 04:30 PM

Why not join the boards (end grain) to make up the length you need?

Did you mean not long enough? Something does not make sense unless you have some board that is the correct thickness and other are too thin. If that is the case, the middle boards do not have to be as thick. Just flat on top.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2261 posts in 2183 days


#9 posted 11-19-2018 05:37 PM

I know what your thinking. Here the part where you have to pay attention to. Hiding the joint between the two boards along the edge. If you just flip them it’s a book match. You run the risk of creating a witness line that is easily spotted esp in the right light.
This might look like two thin boards
This happens a lot with book matched panel as the grab light one side is dark one side is light.
The key to your success is careful selection of your outside boards so you can create a slipmatched joint.
Good luck and always go with the grain.

-- Aj

View Bama8's profile

Bama8

4 posts in 1276 days


#10 posted 11-19-2018 06:41 PM

Bronco: with the length I want (90”) most of my boards will be around or slightly less than 3/4” thick, which will make the top look very thin.

Thanks AJ! I’ll be sure to pay attention to that.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22657 posts in 3491 days


#11 posted 11-19-2018 09:35 PM

If this is to be a high quality heirloom type table, I’d start over with some 6 quarter lumber the full length and plane it to clean up at over 1” thick. But if this will be an everyday table maybe with a table cloth on it, you could do the breadboard in the middle and the ends but you will need some thick aprons the full length to carry the load across those center joints- like 1 ” x 3” stock Adding a piece under the top all around to give the appearance of thicker top will be a right thing to do for looks. Make the long ones full length and that will give you added strength on the edge.

My 2 cents worth…..........Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2344 days


#12 posted 11-19-2018 10:16 PM



Bronco: with the length I want (90”) most of my boards will be around or slightly less than 3/4” thick, which will make the top look very thin.

- Bama8

Bama, I get that. The two outside beadboards and the two outer long boards need to be your best and thickest stock, and all the same thickness. The middle boards only need to be thick enough to properly join and glue them. I’ve seen a farm table with middle boards 1” thinner than the outer boards. No big deal.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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