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I got lucky. Know where your emergency shop kit and closest Urgent Care are!

by Holbs
posted 11-12-2018 08:58 PM


32 replies so far

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

432 posts in 822 days


#1 posted 11-12-2018 09:24 PM

So if I’m gonna have an accident, have it right there. Got it!

Seriously glad the prognosis is good and you got the help you needed. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve slipped with the utility knife in my own general direction. Make a quick adjustment and keep at it, issue out of mind. It’s easy to take a knife for granted when they’re not power tools and you use them all the time. Thanks for the wake up call.

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2425 days


#2 posted 11-12-2018 09:28 PM

I’ve played with utility knife for 50 years. In the military, you would get safety flagged for drawing the knife towards you instead of away. I would call this a simple accident, while avoidable, it’s just more realistic to say when working with sharp objects in a shop, a boo boo will happen. It’s just a matter of when. I do not apply this logic to spinning blades because I do pre/during/post safety checks due to the much larger injury that could occur. Hence, not going all out to purchase a SawStop at this time :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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Firewood

801 posts in 2030 days


#3 posted 11-12-2018 09:47 PM

Yeah, I did that some years back scori g drywall. A real bonehead move. I’m glad it wasn’t more serious.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2425 days


#4 posted 11-12-2018 09:51 PM

Mike…ewww. Drywalls chemicals in your wound. I was lucky in that it was a fresh new blade so not much in contamination (still got a tetnus shot). Couldn’t image the docs scrounging their faces when you told them drywall utility blade :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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000

2859 posts in 1295 days


#5 posted 11-12-2018 09:54 PM


I do not apply this logic to spinning blades because I do pre/during/post safety checks due to the much larger injury that could occur. Hence, not going all out to purchase a SawStop at this time :)

- Holbs

You need to invent a box knife with flesh sensing technology. A blade that would retract in milliseconds.

That looks like it was pretty deep.
Glad it wasn’t worst.
Keep it clean, give it a few days before going full out.

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2425 days


#6 posted 11-12-2018 09:56 PM

J… and get sued? :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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JohnMcClure

631 posts in 1036 days


#7 posted 11-12-2018 09:57 PM

Thanks for sharing this. Looking at your stitches, I have a scar in exactly the same location from a pocketknife incident about 7 years ago. Same situation – holding the work with my left, cutting sort-of toward my hand, knife slipped out past the cut.
Difference was, I was in a situation where admitting an incident (and the whittling activity that led to it) could have had repercussions. A big handful of shop towels and some duct tape is how I managed the wound.

This post reminds me of another recent discussion here in which locking the shop door to avoid distracting visits from family members while cutting… another member suggested that in some situations, that locked door could prevent your family members from coming to your rescue.

These discussions are very good food for thought – I need to put a first aid kit in my shop!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

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lumbering_on

578 posts in 886 days


#8 posted 11-12-2018 10:02 PM

Thanks for posting this, and I’m glad you are doing fine. Other than the passing out part, it seems you avoided any serious issues. I haven’t had any issues with a utility knife, knock on wood, but there are times when the knife turned or slipped in a way that I didn’t expect, and it could have lead to something. It’s like chisels, I don’t think most people think of them when the topic of shop safety comes up, but I’ve seen a few people that had to go to ER because they didn’t keep two hands on them.

Good advice about the FA kit. My wife is a nurse so I have a lot of supplies, but I’ve been in a lot of home shops that don’t have anything past a few Band Aids.

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

490 posts in 869 days


#9 posted 11-12-2018 10:10 PM

Hope you recover quickly! A similar thing happened to me about six weeks ago; except it involved a dremel 2” carving blade in a drill press. Trimming off the excess wood on a project- came to the corner and the blade caught and through the wood, sending the back of my hand into the blade. Ended up in the er and received fifteen stitches; thankfully, other than the size of the cut, it wasn’t all that bad. Definitely reminds me of shop safety- hope you have a speedy recovery!

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

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rockusaf

70 posts in 498 days


#10 posted 11-12-2018 10:13 PM

Thanks for sharing, glad you weren’t hurt too bad. We can all use a reminder every once in a while that we play with dangerous things in the shop all the time. I don’t currently have a first aid kit in the shop, usually use blue shop towel and electrical tape if I cut myself good enough, but I will remedy that soon.

Rock

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Holbs

2213 posts in 2425 days


#11 posted 11-12-2018 10:16 PM

It was after some serious LJ accident post that I spent a good $50-$80 on medical supplies dedicated for shop use. From all sorts of bandaids, good tweezers, gauze, wrap, liquid bandages, even a tourniquet. All in wall hung medicine cabinet near entry door.
What was kinda cool was during the accident, all I could think of were previous accident posts :) I knew with the crime scene massacre blood splatters, I would temp pass out due to sudden drop of blood pressure eventually. Before that happened, I prepared myself for it. Except for where to go after :)
Hence my strong advice about knowing where to go after an accident. You do not have time to think about the address or if they are open or such when your head is flushing down the toilet.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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pintodeluxe

5941 posts in 3209 days


#12 posted 11-12-2018 10:16 PM

These are the injuries that really chap my hide. When a utility knife or a chisel gets you good. There’s not even a power tool to blame! Hey, I’ve been there. Take it easy for a while ok?

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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pottz

5334 posts in 1380 days


#13 posted 11-12-2018 11:07 PM

everyone always talks about cutting a finger off on the table saw but as youve shown the simpelist tool can cause a lot of damage.every aspect of woodworking has its own dangers.thanks for sharing this,i think weve all been guilty of not being careful using sharp knives.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1882 days


#14 posted 11-13-2018 12:57 AM

If shop towels and tape can’t fix it. Nothing can.

I did the same action to my thumb but with a freshly sharpened 1/4” chisel. Amazing how deep them things can go.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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diverlloyd

3511 posts in 2253 days


#15 posted 11-13-2018 01:09 AM

Worst shop cut I have had in the wood shop was from the tape measure tape on the table saw. It sounds dumb but it was damn sharp and cut me like a champ across my palm. I was using a red pad to apply wax to it. It cut through the pad,the glove and the palm. Who would think that the tape measure tape would be like a razor. I stitched it up and was back at it. Tried to get the wife to learn how to do stitches but that is a big no go since she about passed out on that one.

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

10665 posts in 2235 days


#16 posted 11-13-2018 02:05 AM

Thankfully, you got the care you needed, Holbs. I suspect the wound required some internal stitches due to the depth of the cut (sutures and stitches are the same thing). Might I add to your preparedness list…always carry a list of your current meds with you. Your ER/Urgent care staff will appreciate it and you will not be extra stressed trying to remember!
Thanks for sharing.

-- God bless, Candy

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1882 days


#17 posted 11-13-2018 02:14 AM

I love urgent cares around here. A couple hundred for stitches instead of a couple thousand in the ER.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4007 posts in 2384 days


#18 posted 11-13-2018 02:22 AM

Glad you will be OK. Utility knives are responsible for a lot of injuries. Where I worked they were often the subject of safety talks before shift.

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3428 days


#19 posted 11-13-2018 03:49 AM

That’s a Very Nasty Cut! I’m alway careful with Razor Knives! I’ve been “Bitten” a few times.

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1319 posts in 2348 days


#20 posted 11-13-2018 01:10 PM

I have a scar on the same area of my left hand from a very similar utility knife accident. Fortunately for me the angle of the blade was such that the cut was not very deep. More like slicing a flap of flesh on the palm of my hand. Thirteen stitches if I remember correctly.

Regarding your comment about long waits at the emergency room. They are well trained to triage patients based on the urgency of their condition. Show up with a bad cold and you will wait. Show up with a blood soaked rag on your hand with blood dripping on their countertop and you will be seen quickly to stabilize things. You might wait a while to get the actual stitches, but they won’t let you bleed out on the floor.

I am certain they asked, but for those who get a bad cut and treat it at home. Is your tetanus shot up to date?

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firefighterontheside

20312 posts in 2252 days


#21 posted 11-13-2018 02:08 PM

Ouch. Listen to Candy, she might know something about an ER.
Your insurance has to cover an ER visit whether the hospital is in or out of network. That’s good, because when people are in a true emergency, they need to go to the closest hospital and not necessarily the one in their plan. Regarding stopping bleeding, for an injury like yours the best thing is direct pressure. I’ve been an EMT for over 25 years and don’t keep a kit in the shop. When I cut my finger, my other hand is my bleeding control. You don’t want to just keep piling gauze on and filling it with blood. That’s just controlling the mess and not stopping the bleeding. You can use the gauze, but it needs to be applied with some sort of pressure dressing, like the fridge’s electrical tape. If the gauze fills with blood, don’t remove it to add more, just put more gauze on top and apply more pressure. When I cut up the end of my ring finger with a biscuit cutter, I just pressed the end of my finger into my palm and went to the hospital. I am probably 30 minutes from the nearest hospital or urgent care. Don’t forget about just calling 911. Even if they don’t transport you, they will come and do a good job of dressing the wound, then someone else can take you to the hospital. There should only be a bill from an ambulance if they transport you. Take care and be careful.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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bigblockyeti

5746 posts in 2116 days


#22 posted 11-15-2018 12:42 AM

I have that same knife, love how quickly you can pop a new blade out of the handle and into the blade holder at the business end. I know a sharp knife is supposed to be safer than a dull one but I can’t help but wonder if the laceration wouldn’t have been a little less severe with a dull blade. Then again it could have been just as bad but with more tearing and far more painful.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2805 days


#23 posted 11-15-2018 02:41 AM



Worst shop cut I have had in the wood shop was from the tape measure tape on the table saw. It sounds dumb but it was damn sharp and cut me like a champ across my palm. I was using a red pad to apply wax to it. It cut through the pad,the glove and the palm. Who would think that the tape measure tape would be like a razor. I stitched it up and was back at it. Tried to get the wife to learn how to do stitches but that is a big no go since she about passed out on that one.

- diverlloyd

I was with my Dad as a kid when he pulled the tape measure. It got stuck and then let loose. Had to drive him to the ER. Bunch of stitches but not very deep. Sharp, very sharp that tape is.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

505 posts in 575 days


#24 posted 11-15-2018 02:45 AM

Glad you didn’t do any serious damage. I have that same scar. Seriously, when yours heals, it will look exactly like mine. Same spot to a T.

I always think before I cut with them now. Bet you will too.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3511 posts in 2253 days


#25 posted 11-15-2018 02:49 AM

Wb I always thought that the tape was just a sticker applied to the tablesaw fence. Now I know that it has a metal middle section.

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GR8HUNTER

6110 posts in 1108 days


#26 posted 11-15-2018 03:22 AM

OUCH :<((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Mainiac Matt

9153 posts in 2724 days


#27 posted 11-15-2018 04:02 AM

I visit a lot of industrial facilities and factories as part of my job and it is not uncommon to see companies ban the use of utility knives… as in, they are not allowed on the premises.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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ColonelTravis

1976 posts in 2290 days


#28 posted 11-15-2018 04:53 PM


If shop towels and tape can’t fix it. Nothing can.

I did the same action to my thumb but with a freshly sharpened 1/4” chisel. Amazing how deep them things can go.

- TheFridge

I did that, except replace “1/4 inch chisel” with “1 inch chisel” and replace “thumb” with “my skull”. Hello, emergency room stapler!

Holbs, good job with the foresight and I’m glad it wasn’t worse.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2213 posts in 2425 days


#29 posted 03-01-2019 05:52 PM

+++ update +++
a good 3 months later, final billing came in. Before insurance: $1000 for ER doctor himself, $2700 for ER visit. After insurance: $172 for ER doc, $1500 for ER visit.
All for 8 stitches. No MRI, no ligament damage… just simple stitches (well, deeper than normal stitches/sutures).
Was told for my local urgent cares, which does not makes sense to me, urgent cares are not meant for lacerations or broken bones but more so headaches or flu.

Keep that $$$ in mind when it comes to at home safety prevention. And maybe, keep your animal veterinarian on speed dial instead of ER :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5746 posts in 2116 days


#30 posted 03-01-2019 06:06 PM


And maybe, keep your animal veterinarian on speed dial instead of ER :)

- Holbs

My brother’s wife is a veterinarian and she won’t even work on him! She’s very by the book and they can all get in a heap of trouble if working on folks instead of Fido. That being said, she would fix someone in an emergency but only if an MD wasn’t readily available.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

472 posts in 3431 days


#31 posted 03-01-2019 06:36 PM


...
Keep that $$$ in mind when it comes to at home safety prevention. And maybe, keep your animal veterinarian on speed dial instead of ER :)

- Holbs


I was reading this and thinking, “look at your ER deductible” and think about it as you stock your first aid kit and as you think about safety practices. ER deductibles have gone way up in the last few years.

I’m glad you’re ok. It stinks that it cost that much, of course.

BTW, I have a scar on my forearm from the same knife. It was a fresh blade, so a very clean cut, but I still have the scar from it and the four stitches. I was doing something stupid and it bit me.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View Steve's profile

Steve

1283 posts in 978 days


#32 posted 03-01-2019 06:59 PM

Got a nice 18g brad nail in the finger the other day. Popped out the side and hit my finger that was holding the workpiece. That felt pretty good.

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