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All Replies on can anybody help identify this wood it came out of north west illinois

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View pasthelp's profile

can anybody help identify this wood it came out of north west illinois

by pasthelp
posted 11-11-2018 04:52 PM


22 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1881 days


#1 posted 11-11-2018 06:30 PM

cypress Alder

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1835 posts in 558 days


#2 posted 11-11-2018 06:34 PM

looks very similar to Bald Cypress

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.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View pasthelp's profile

pasthelp

6 posts in 227 days


#3 posted 11-12-2018 07:44 PM

I did not know cypress grew in Illinois ?

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 885 days


#4 posted 11-12-2018 08:18 PM



I did not know cypress grew in Illinois ?

- pasthelp

+1
I thought it was strictly a southern tree that grew in wetlands. Does anyone know of a wood that resembles cypress that grows that far north?

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3511 posts in 2253 days


#5 posted 11-12-2018 08:34 PM

If it’s hard I would say Osage orange.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1835 posts in 558 days


#6 posted 11-12-2018 09:01 PM

was the tree itself felled and milled in Illinois – or was just that board found there ?
.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View pasthelp's profile

pasthelp

6 posts in 227 days


#7 posted 11-13-2018 01:50 AM

it was growing in the middle of a bunch of cherry trees in north west Illinois

View pasthelp's profile

pasthelp

6 posts in 227 days


#8 posted 11-13-2018 01:51 AM

and it is a hard wood

View pasthelp's profile

pasthelp

6 posts in 227 days


#9 posted 11-13-2018 01:52 AM

very hard

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16134 posts in 3014 days


#10 posted 11-13-2018 02:07 AM

Dan Krager (LJ) has milled osage orange and worked with it. He’d know if it’s OO.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1881 days


#11 posted 11-13-2018 02:09 AM

Definitely cypress alder which is softer than pine.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3511 posts in 2253 days


#12 posted 11-13-2018 03:05 AM


Any of these around the tree that was cut down?

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16134 posts in 3014 days


#13 posted 11-13-2018 03:18 AM

We call those “hedge apples” :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1881 days


#14 posted 11-13-2018 03:27 AM

There was a tree that had those in it, that i used to play in when I was little. That thing was huge. 100 year old live oak kinda huge.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1172 posts in 2982 days


#15 posted 11-13-2018 03:34 AM



We call those “hedge apples” :-)

- Smitty_Cabinetshop


So did we and they made awesome projectiles. I had some nice bruises from having hedge Apple wars.

View pasthelp's profile

pasthelp

6 posts in 227 days


#16 posted 11-13-2018 03:51 AM

it is not soft not at all

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1881 days


#17 posted 11-13-2018 06:06 AM

Sorry. Definitely “not”. I got excited just knowing I was about to type alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1122 posts in 3521 days


#18 posted 11-13-2018 04:04 PM

Morning, I can’t identify this board, but I can tell you it is not Osage Orange. I just got four logs of it donated to my shop. I carved a feather wand out of recently and the color, grain, texture is not right for Osage Orange.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1816 posts in 2871 days


#19 posted 11-14-2018 12:12 PM

Looks to me like it is from the Softwood group and not the Hardwood group from the growth ring structure. It looks like one of the hard yellow pines like red pine or shortleaf pine. A close up pic of the end grain will confirm this if it is true.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2803 posts in 2743 days


#20 posted 11-14-2018 12:24 PM

My guess is either red elm or ash. I’m curious if you got it from a Sawyer up there? Johnson Creek Hardwoods (Mt Carrol, IL) is where I get my lumber. They get most of their logs from the local area. Check their site for pictures to compare grain.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4290 posts in 2163 days


#21 posted 11-14-2018 12:51 PM

Looks like ash.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3511 posts in 2253 days


#22 posted 11-14-2018 01:47 PM



We call those “hedge apples” :-)

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

We called them river apples.

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