LumberJocks

All Replies on Considering Buying a SawStop - Thoughts?

  • Advertise with us
View WoodshopTherapy's profile

Considering Buying a SawStop - Thoughts?

by WoodshopTherapy
posted 11-10-2018 10:38 PM


1 2 3 next »
105 replies

105 replies so far

View jonah's profile

jonah

2092 posts in 3860 days


#1 posted 11-10-2018 10:48 PM

The Sawstop saws are fantastic table saws even without the braking feature. They’re a bit more money than a comparable Unisaw, but they’re definitely top quality saws. If I hadn’t come across a very good deal on my Unisaw, I would own a Sawstop right now. I’ve used them at friends’ before and they’re fantastic.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1268 posts in 2101 days


#2 posted 11-10-2018 10:50 PM

At the end of the day, it’s your call. if you can afford it, why not? The fit, finish, power, usability, and safety are fantastic (yes, I have one). The only reason I got one was 1) My old Delta contractor saw wasn’t going to do what I wanted in the long run, 2) saw a very very experienced woodworker on YT (Mathias Wandell) have an accident and realized the Reality that it can happen to anyone regardless of experience (Diresta too). That was enough to push me over the edge. Don’t regret it one bit. If you Do decide to get it, don’t skimp on the accessories, especially on the Mobile Base.

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1051 days


#3 posted 11-10-2018 11:48 PM



At the end of the day, it s your call. if you can afford it, why not? The fit, finish, power, usability, and safety are fantastic (yes, I have one). The only reason I got one was 1) My old Delta contractor saw wasn t going to do what I wanted in the long run, 2) saw a very very experienced woodworker on YT (Mathias Wandell) have an accident and realized the Reality that it can happen to anyone regardless of experience (Diresta too). That was enough to push me over the edge. Don t regret it one bit. If you Do decide to get it, don t skimp on the accessories, especially on the Mobile Base.

- Rayne

In addition to those videos, and they are worth watching, I came across this video a couple of years back.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UuTYbwvEaM

Not a well-known YT channel, but he’s run a cabinet shop for over 40 years. Notice that he’s using quite a good safety set up, but still makes a big mistake.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6693 posts in 1274 days


#4 posted 11-11-2018 12:06 AM

you still have to follow all safety practices :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2520 days


#5 posted 11-11-2018 12:08 AM

I’m for it!

Love mine and it was a pretty good stretch when I bought it. I could not justify one accident or mistake not being avoided. The fit and finish of my PCS are excellent. I had fun with her all day today! Get a good blade and enjoy!

The Forest WWII is very good.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3081 posts in 2586 days


#6 posted 11-11-2018 01:03 AM

I’m all for safety (also motherhood and apple pie), but I’ve never liked the way SS achieves it. From the beginning, I was convinced it’s not necessary to stop the blade, it only needs to drop beneath the table. Slamming it into that sacrificial aluminum block is like stopping your car by driving into a bridge abutment.

Bosch came up with a rival design (I actually saw one in the flesh at my local hardware store), but I believe SS sued and shut them down. Too bad, because I like to see any monopoly challenged. Videos of Bosch’s looked good, and much easier and cheaper to reset in the event of a triggering. And it didn’t ruin the blade.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View lumbering_on's profile

lumbering_on

578 posts in 1051 days


#7 posted 11-11-2018 01:12 AM



I m all for safety (also motherhood and apple pie), but I ve never liked the way SS achieves it. From the beginning, I was convinced it s not necessary to stop the blade, it only needs to drop beneath the table. Slamming it into that sacrificial aluminum block is like stopping your car by driving into a bridge abutment.

Bosch came up with a rival design (I actually saw one in the flesh at my local hardware store), but I believe SS sued and shut them down. Too bad, because I like to see any monopoly challenged. Videos of Bosch s looked good, and much easier and cheaper to reset in the event of a triggering. And it didn t ruin the blade.

- runswithscissors

I’m not a fan of what they did, but the founder was a lawyer, so that’s what happens. Festool’s parent company actually bought them, so I’m interested to see what happens when the patents expire in a year or two. The Bosch saw is still available here, but it’s only in a contractor saw, so it’s pretty limited.

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

900 posts in 2831 days


#8 posted 11-11-2018 01:16 AM

6 year owner of a SawStop 3Hp Cabinet Saw. I agree with all the positives above. They are quality machines. Fired mine twice. Once saved a finger with a nick so small it there was no blood. The other was a short that I caused but was not a safety issue. SawStop replaced the first cartirdge and the Forester WWII blade was repaired and resharpened by Forest. Forest is a great company making excellent blades and has great services.

-- socrbent Ohio

View GT350's profile

GT350

376 posts in 2543 days


#9 posted 11-11-2018 01:32 AM

I have had the SS cabinet saw for about 3 years, I have not had one problem and so far I have never set it off. I would definitely buy it again.

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

393 posts in 1211 days


#10 posted 11-11-2018 02:00 AM

Scott,
I am in the same position.
I have a 15 year old Delta hybrid saw (that’s working fine) but I keep pondering replacing it with a SawStop PCS.
If my saw had a riving knife I don’t know if I would be thinking about replacing it or not.
My saw is accurate and repeatable so for me the SawStop would be strictly for the safety feature.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

20684 posts in 2418 days


#11 posted 11-11-2018 02:07 AM

I’m buying one in the next few weeks. Several years ago I would have said you don’t need it. Over those years, a few friends have had accidents, so my mind has changed. Now that I’ve started my business and want to upgrade to 3 hp, it seems like the right time to bite the bullet. I say do it and don’t look back.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4314 posts in 1135 days


#12 posted 11-11-2018 02:24 AM

Have you had an injury with the Delta? How many years have you used it?

-- Think safe, be safe

View clin's profile

clin

1072 posts in 1557 days


#13 posted 11-11-2018 04:57 AM

I have a SawStop 3 HP PCS. I’d buy it again without question. It’s a great saw.

I view the SS as insurance. It cost some, but the potential savings is huge. Is someone stupid for not having a SS? Of course not. Just like I don’t have anti-lock brakes on my truck. But, I’d be better off if I did.

In the end no one is perfect, and we all make mistakes. Most of the time we get away unscathed, but every once in awhile, luck runs out and something bad happens. No one is immune from this. I see the SawStop safety feature just like air bags in a car. Odds are you will never need them, but if you do, you’ll be darn glad you have them.

-- Clin

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

219 posts in 1417 days


#14 posted 11-11-2018 08:21 AM

After I almost put my hand onto a spinning blade, I realized $2500 was cheap insurance and I have no regrets.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5836 posts in 3055 days


#15 posted 11-11-2018 12:04 PM

When the SS patents expire, I would expect to see the same feature on almost every saw…we can only hope that others implement a system that’s as well thought out as what SS has on the market. They are great saws; just as important they have great CS is you even need them. I just hope that doesn’t change over tiem with the new ownership.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4273 posts in 2550 days


#16 posted 11-11-2018 12:48 PM

I am not certain when the patents expire but would not expect every saw to have it. It is not just the Bradbury the entire mechanism that must survive a large shock to stop the blade and lower it. Also, any company that has such a device will need expensive and thorough testing and hefty liability backing. If a brake fails to activate, there will be large lawsuits.

I have had my Sawstop for a number of years and love it.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3131 posts in 2734 days


#17 posted 11-11-2018 12:52 PM

You need to answer only one question. How much is a finger or hand worth. It doesn’t matter how careful you are and sometime something unexpected is going to happen.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View jat's profile (online now)

jat

77 posts in 3333 days


#18 posted 11-11-2018 01:09 PM

Scott: I have a 3hp Professional SS and love it. As everyone else has said, the fit, finish and overall quality are second to none. After I assembled everything, I checked the miter slot to the blade and fence to the miter slot with a dial caliper. Each time, I set the caliper to zero and moved it the entire length of the slot and then the fence and the reading remained zero the entire length. I was extremely impressed.

As far as the cartridge brake, I activated it just the other day (first time). My plug outlet is in the ceiling above my saw (being changed Monday) and as I ran a long board through the blade, the end that was extended beyond the left side of the table contacted the cord hanging down and pulled the plug from the outlet. The cord fell straight down into the blade and the brake went off. Of course, I never saw any of this and it took me a few seconds to figure out what happened. Anyway, the spinning blade only nicked the cord’s covering and none of the wire inside.

For what it’s worth, that feature alone justifies the saw to me.

View jmos's profile

jmos

916 posts in 2931 days


#19 posted 11-11-2018 02:14 PM

Another 3hp PCS owner here. It’s a great saw. The premium for the brake is quite reasonable for the insurance you get. I like Clin’s anti-lock brake analogy – you don’t have to have it, but it sure is good to have when you need it.

If the SawStop was a crappy saw with a good safety feature, it would be a hard decision. Fortunately, it’s a great saw.

I also don’t like the was SawStop went about marketing the saw and the legal nonsense they tried, but it doesn’t change the fact they currently have something no one else does. That’s how the patent system works. I do hope, and expect, the other big tablesaw manufacturers will add this feature when the patents expire. But, for now, if I was in the market for a saw, as I was a couple of years ago, I’d go Sawstop.

-- John

View WoodshopTherapy's profile

WoodshopTherapy

68 posts in 666 days


#20 posted 11-11-2018 02:37 PM



At the end of the day, it s your call. if you can afford it, why not? The fit, finish, power, usability, and safety are fantastic (yes, I have one). The only reason I got one was 1) My old Delta contractor saw wasn t going to do what I wanted in the long run, 2) saw a very very experienced woodworker on YT (Mathias Wandell) have an accident and realized the Reality that it can happen to anyone regardless of experience (Diresta too). That was enough to push me over the edge. Don t regret it one bit. If you Do decide to get it, don t skimp on the accessories, especially on the Mobile Base.

- Rayne

Thanks Rayne, that’s very helpful! Scott

-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge

View WoodshopTherapy's profile

WoodshopTherapy

68 posts in 666 days


#21 posted 11-11-2018 02:41 PM



Have you had an injury with the Delta? How many years have you used it?

- therealSteveN

No injuries, and have owned my Delta for 20 years – bought it new. Hoping to sell it to help pay for the SawStop

-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge

View WoodshopTherapy's profile

WoodshopTherapy

68 posts in 666 days


#22 posted 11-11-2018 02:48 PM

Thank you everyone for your advice! Keep the comments coming as I’m starting to see a theme here. Scott Bennett

-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1268 posts in 2101 days


#23 posted 11-11-2018 02:48 PM


Have you had an injury with the Delta? How many years have you used it?

- therealSteveN

No injuries, and have owned my Delta for 20 years – bought it new. Hoping to sell it to help pay for the SawStop

- WoodshopTherapy

That’s what I did. Selling the Delta was supposed to be the SS fund, but because it was a contractor saw, it became the SS Accessories fund (ICS Mobile Base, overarm dust collection [didn’t buy it when it was free], extra brake cartridge, dado cartridge, and ZCI for Dado).

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2520 days


#24 posted 11-11-2018 06:18 PM

”If the SawStop was a crappy saw with a good safety feature, it would be a hard decision. Fortunately, it’s a great saw.”

Well said, John.

The fact is that to drop the blade, the saw needs the inertia from the blade to do it. And the saw MUST be excellent in build quality to handle the beating and still work like new. It is as good as any saw in the price range if not better.

Good luck Scott. Let us know how you like it when you get one!

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5434 posts in 2870 days


#25 posted 11-11-2018 06:27 PM

Leaving politics out of it the SawStop is a good saw. If you want it and have the money I say go for it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View RJweb's profile

RJweb

133 posts in 3194 days


#26 posted 11-11-2018 08:20 PM

I also have a 3 hp Sawstop and love it, very well made piece of equipment, i would buy even if it didn’t have the safety feature, that is just a cherry on top, RJ

-- Life Begins @ 190 MPH

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2520 days


#27 posted 11-11-2018 08:22 PM

”If the SawStop was a crappy saw with a good safety feature, it would be a hard decision. Fortunately, it’s a great saw.”

Well said, John.

The fact is that to drop the blade, the saw needs the inertia from the blade to do it. And the saw MUST be excellent in build quality to handle the beating and still work like new. It is as good as any saw in the price range if not better.

Good luck Scott. Let us know how you like it when you get one!

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View JustAWS's profile

JustAWS

3 posts in 393 days


#28 posted 11-11-2018 09:10 PM

In the world of firearms there’s a saying: “There are two types of people: Those who have had a negligent discharge, and those who will.” I view table saw accidents in much the same way.

As a brand new woodworker with no table saw experience, I went with a SS for extra peace of mind. I’m still being diligent in following all safety procedures about table saws, but it’s helpful to know that if I have a mishap in the future, it will likely be less catastrophic.

Using a Sawstop may limit some of the accessories you can or will want to buy or use, or will just require more attention on your part. Specifically, you’ll need to be careful with any aftermarket aluminum miter gauges that you don’t knick the gauge with your blade, or you’ll trigger the brake. Likewise, on any crosscut sled you make, you’ll have to be careful if you integrate T-track into the design that you never cut into the T-track if you aren’t in bypass mode.

For the crosscut sleds, the solution seems to be that you either need to mount the track higher than the saw can extend (which would make for a potentially awkward height to the rear fence of the sled), or leave a gap in the track when you install it on the fence. I’ve seen where people have added the gap by cutting into the fence using their saws in bypass mode, and others where they cut the track on their miter saw and add the gap themselves during the installation.

-- JAWS: Just Another Woodworking Schmuck

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2563 posts in 2359 days


#29 posted 11-11-2018 10:00 PM

I don’t think I could ever be happy with a Saw Stop.
I’ve been using a table saw with a 12 inch blade for almost 4 years now. It’s a small cabinet saw with long outfeed super flat top and fence, 4 inches of blade above the top.Its a vintage saw but just really cuts great.
There’s no doubt SS is a quality saw but it only has a 10 inch blade :( I also sold a unisaw in hopes for something better.

-- Aj

View Vinnyhey's profile

Vinnyhey

2 posts in 393 days


#30 posted 11-11-2018 11:06 PM

I’ve been running one sawstop since 2008 (at work) and another since 2010 (at home). They are both the industrial models. The saws are amazing in all ways, customer service is impeccable. The one at work has had some problems and they’ve covered everything, every time. I’ve seen 3 people touch the blade at work on accident and only needed a bandage. My wife made me buy the one for home and last winter I touched the dado blade and it did it’s job. I never thought I’d make that mistake but it happened, it was like getting hit by a hammer. And I needed a bandage but overall I was good to go. I’m surprised by the negative responses on here but once you’ve used one you’ll be sold, it’s worth every penny.

View moke's profile

moke

1453 posts in 3338 days


#31 posted 11-12-2018 12:02 AM

Eight year owner of a 3 HP 52” PCS. I have never regretted it for a minute. I recently got the new folding out feed that took it up another notch. I am not a fan of the politics, nor the the legal maneuvering, but I am of the saw. I bought it and never looked back. I had some friends that could not over look the politics and bought some other brands of saws. I helped them put their saws together. ( They needed help and I was snoopy) A PM, Grizzly and a General…...they were all nice, but none had the attention to detail in the instructions and did not have the fit and finish. Even the PM was not as nice.
Just my .02

-- Mike

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

578 posts in 2107 days


#32 posted 11-12-2018 05:00 PM

If you can swing the money I’d go for it. I’m saving up for one now.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3676 posts in 3670 days


#33 posted 11-13-2018 02:50 AM

The only thing I regret about purchasing my JSS is that it is small. I should have sprung for the bigger saw and just made room for it. This saw does what I need, but it could be bigger.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View Jacksdad's profile

Jacksdad

240 posts in 985 days


#34 posted 11-13-2018 03:17 AM

I’m going to play the other side, I would not buy a SawStop. I’ve used one a lot, it’s a great saw but I use dado blades a lot and when you change to the dado blade you also change and adjust the cartridge. Also your Delta is a right tilt and the new SawStop is left tilting. Third, I had a student cut off a finger with the Sawstop, he had the saw unplugged and the blade was jammed. When he unstuck the blade it spun and took off his finger, because it was unplugged it didn’t activate the cartridge.

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1287 posts in 3148 days


#35 posted 11-13-2018 03:49 AM

I have a Delta Unisaw 5hp love it and would trade it. I use a saw stop 3hp pcs at the woodworking club shop. When I taught high school I bought a 1.75 hp pcs for the engineering prototype lab. The school just purchased a 5 hp industrial saw stop for the woodshop. I think you can’t go wrong with the saw stop if that is your goal.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1976 posts in 2455 days


#36 posted 11-13-2018 04:10 AM


Third, I had a student cut off a finger with the Sawstop, he had the saw unplugged and the blade was jammed. When he unstuck the blade it spun and took off his finger, because it was unplugged it didn t activate the cartridge.

- Jacksdad

Was that the fault of the saw or the user? I don’t know either way, which is why I ask. Regardless, that’s just a terrible thing to happen.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4314 posts in 1135 days


#37 posted 11-13-2018 04:46 AM


Third, I had a student cut off a finger with the Sawstop, he had the saw unplugged and the blade was jammed. When he unstuck the blade it spun and took off his finger, because it was unplugged it didn t activate the cartridge.

- Jacksdad

Was that the fault of the saw or the user? I don t know either way, which is why I ask. Regardless, that s just a terrible thing to happen.

- ColonelTravis

There have been some instances where it wasn’t the perfect tool to have, and all I have heard about them was that user was most definitely at fault, because the saws guard was not in use. This is my issue with the weenie cutting technology. People using it almost always shed the guards. Really is hard to get your fingers to something that is covered up.

Anyone who has ever been out of the house knows that mechanical things sometimes fail, trusting the weenie cutter to save you from yourself is a silly bet. That BS argument that they can’t see what they are doing??? TS folks, 2 kinds of cut RIP, and CROSSCUT. Rip you are keeping the stock against the fence, that is what you need to be looking at. Crosscut either a miter gauge, or sled in use and you will sight where you are going long before you go, if you are doing it right. So you do NOT need to see the cut.

If you want to buy a SS, go for it, just use the guards. Page 5 on the owners manual says you are wrong if you don’t. In court you will lose, because they tell you to use the guards.

-- Think safe, be safe

View WoodshopTherapy's profile

WoodshopTherapy

68 posts in 666 days


#38 posted 11-13-2018 11:23 AM



I’ve been running one sawstop since 2008 (at work) and another since 2010 (at home). They are both the industrial models. The saws are amazing in all ways, customer service is impeccable. The one at work has had some problems and they’ve covered everything, every time. I’ve seen 3 people touch the blade at work on accident and only needed a bandage. My wife made me buy the one for home and last winter I touched the dado blade and it did it’s job. I never thought I’d make that mistake but it happened, it was like getting hit by a hammer. And I needed a bandage but overall I was good to go. I’m surprised by the negative responses on here but once you’ve used one you’ll be sold, it’s worth every penny.

- Vinnyhey

Thanks for your post. I found this very helpful!

-- Scott Bennett - sharing woodworking knowledge

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3064 posts in 3999 days


#39 posted 11-13-2018 01:11 PM

I’ve had my PCS for two years now. Like those above, very well made and accurate. I’ve never triggered the safety mechanism and hope I never have to but glad it’s there.

My advice is the same I gave to my nephew and sons in laws, all in their 30’s. “You’ve got a lot of years to go with lots of time to lose your fingers. There is no option here, you have to get this saw”. It’s expensive, but the upside is you don’t have to compromise features and quality for safety. You get it all.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2520 days


#40 posted 11-13-2018 02:58 PM

You can change the Dado cartridge in about 60 seconds with your eyes closed.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1268 posts in 2101 days


#41 posted 11-13-2018 03:26 PM



You can change the Dado cartridge in about 60 seconds with your eyes closed.

- BroncoBrian

+1 Cartridge change outs are very easy and quick once you know what you’re looking at.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2563 posts in 2359 days


#42 posted 11-13-2018 04:36 PM

Looks like Scott is getting a new saw soon. :)

-- Aj

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

745 posts in 2708 days


#43 posted 11-13-2018 07:19 PM

I’m in the same boat at the OP. I know I’m going to get one, but now I need to figure out “where” to buy it from. There aren’t any local dealers so I will have worry with the freight thing. I’ve read some horror stories here on that.

Interested to see what your source for the saw is. In other words, who are you buying from?

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3064 posts in 3999 days


#44 posted 11-13-2018 07:26 PM



I m in the same boat at the OP. I know I m going to get one, but now I need to figure out “where” to buy it from. There aren t any local dealers so I will have worry with the freight thing. I ve read some horror stories here on that.

Interested to see what your source for the saw is. In other words, who are you buying from?

- ScottM

usually Woodcraft stores are everywhere. I think you are in Mobile. There is one there. They’ll put it in your truck for you but you’ve got to offload it. I did it myself but it took some creative thinking. The delivery cost is often $250 so even if you need to rent a uhaul it’s worth it. And when they deliver it it’s often just to the curb anyway.

Here in Maine I drove to NH (no tax) and picked it up myself. The savings were about $400 over what they could have been if purchased in Maine and delivered.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

20684 posts in 2418 days


#45 posted 11-13-2018 09:25 PM

You can get one from amazon or woodcraft and probably pay no tax, but pay 250 shipping. You can buy it locally and pay no shipping, but pay almost 250 for sales tax. I’ve decided to buy locally and support local economy and have someone local for support if I need it. When I say local, I mean over an hour from my house. Nothing is truly local to me.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View clin's profile

clin

1072 posts in 1557 days


#46 posted 11-13-2018 09:55 PM

When I bought mine the pricing was always about the same. Local I paid sales tax, but no shipping, online, lower cost, but shipping. Or if shipping included, then a higher cost. I think for the most part, SS like many companies, holds there dealers to a fixed advertised price so it always seemed to be about the same. Of course, they may sell it for less if you ask.

And there is sales tax, though I’m not one to try to avoid that. But, even that is changing now so that many online sources charge sales tax.

I recommend buying locally if possible. While it is unlikely you will have a problem, if you do, it can be much easier to resolve if you have a local dealer. Having to pack up a TS and ship it back to someone would be a major hassle. While the local dealer could demand you hump the saw back to them, I think most would be willing to come get and swap out the saw. And I think there is always value in doing business locally.

-- Clin

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3064 posts in 3999 days


#47 posted 11-13-2018 10:24 PM

One thing I can recommend is that if you will need to move it around much the industrial dolly. That is if you’re getting the Professional or Industrial saw. The dolly that comes with the Professional is well made but it’s three point and only one wheel turns. Moving it in a tight space isn’t easy.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5836 posts in 3055 days


#48 posted 11-14-2018 11:59 AM



I m in the same boat at the OP. I know I m going to get one, but now I need to figure out “where” to buy it from. There aren t any local dealers so I will have worry with the freight thing. I ve read some horror stories here on that.

Interested to see what your source for the saw is. In other words, who are you buying from?

- ScottM

I bought my ICS from Acme Tools. I’ve bought stuff from them for many years, going back to when they Tool Crib of the North” and have never had a problem (shipping is free). They even have free lift gate delivery. My biggest complaint is that their normal carrier is ABF, and they don’t have a terminal near by (I prefer to pick my stuff up at the terminal). They can use others, but you have to talk to them about the choices.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

20684 posts in 2418 days


#49 posted 11-14-2018 12:36 PM

I just checked Acme. It says free shipping, but it has a “special handling charge” of $250.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

745 posts in 2708 days


#50 posted 11-14-2018 01:37 PM

I didn’t mean to hijack this post! Just thought sourcing might be helpful as well. No Woodcraft here. There used to be several years ago but no longer. There is a dealer about an hour away in Florida. Trying to decide between them and Acme…..

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

1 2 3 next »
105 replies


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com