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View DP1's profile

Planning and joining 3x5 reclaimed beams

by DP1
posted 11-07-2018 04:47 PM


13 replies so far

View LesB's profile

LesB

2055 posts in 3777 days


#1 posted 11-07-2018 05:57 PM

With your limited equipment I think I would find a local wood working shop with the proper equipment to handle the planing part of the job.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Rich's profile

Rich

4279 posts in 923 days


#2 posted 11-07-2018 07:24 PM

It it a Franklin planner? Given that the beams are 10 feet long and your planer in feed and out feed tables probably only span maybe 3, the beam will still follow its curvature as it passes through.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2214 posts in 2323 days


#3 posted 11-07-2018 07:48 PM

The beam will have to be supported at each end of the bow, ie a sled, to remove the bow. It will work, the planer wont have enough downforce to straighten the beam out.

View DP1's profile

DP1

3 posts in 169 days


#4 posted 11-09-2018 03:39 PM

Rich, I was going to support the beam on each side of the planer with roller stands that I have. Osu55, This may be a stupid question but would I want to plane with bow up or bow down? Can you describe a little more how I can put a sled on each side of the bow.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4279 posts in 923 days


#5 posted 11-09-2018 03:52 PM


Rich, I was going to support the beam on each side of the planer with roller stands that I have.

- DP1

You didn’t mention that in your original post. A roller won’t support the full length of the beam. What’s going to happen when the end of it goes past the roller?

Your best bet is to get it close with a hand plane, then run it through the planer.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Rich's profile

Rich

4279 posts in 923 days


#6 posted 11-09-2018 03:53 PM

.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2214 posts in 2323 days


#7 posted 11-09-2018 03:54 PM



Rich, I was going to support the beam on each side of the planer with roller stands that I have. Osu55, This may be a stupid question but would I want to plane with bow up or bow down? Can you describe a little more how I can put a sled on each side of the bow.

- DP1


May be wrong but put the hi center up, support each end with a piece of wood that will ride on the roller stands. Have to get everything coplaner to work correctly. I’m thinking that the bottom of the beam will not touch the planer bed.After getting the “center” long enough to be supported by the planer bed, flip and work on the hi ends. Flip back and forth to flat.

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1233 days


#8 posted 11-09-2018 04:00 PM

Also,
if you can cut the 10” beam down to just a couple inches bigger than what you are going to need,
it will be easier.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5899 posts in 3147 days


#9 posted 11-09-2018 05:56 PM

You are correct that a planer can take some bow out of a large timber (because it doesn’t flex as much as thin stock). However, a portable planer doesn’t usually have a long reference bed like a jointer does.

As long as you realize that a jointer first, followed by a planer is the correct method… and that using a planer only won’t produce perfect results… here’s what you can do…

Take a piece of melamine as wide as your planer capacity, and about 42-48” long. Raise your planer height up and insert the melamine on top of the planer bed. Screw a couple cleats underneath the melamine to keep it from passing through the planer as you work. Then simply plane the timbers using the melamine as a long reference surface. Send them through concave side down. It works for timbers that are slightly bowed, but not if they’re twisted.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View DP1's profile

DP1

3 posts in 169 days


#10 posted 11-09-2018 06:18 PM

Using cleats to prevent the melamine from going through wont damage the rolling mechanism that normally pulls the wood through?

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1294 posts in 2286 days


#11 posted 11-09-2018 06:37 PM



Using cleats to prevent the melamine from going through wont damage the rolling mechanism that normally pulls the wood through?

- DP1

No. It is sitting on the regular bed of the planer and just serves to make that reference surface longer. The beam will be sliding on the melamine. You could give it a coat of wax to help. The rollers don’t even know the melamine is there.

View jmos's profile

jmos

913 posts in 2703 days


#12 posted 11-09-2018 07:01 PM

The planer sled idea is a good one. You should also definitely cut the board closer to length; shorter will be easier flatten.

A couple other ideas: Depending on how much you need to take off, you could mark a straight line and rough cut it at the band saw, then use the planer to clean it up.

You could also clamp a long straight board to your table saw fence as a reference straight edge and cut a straight edge on your board that way (you’ll probably have to flip the board end-for-end to get all the way through.)

Or, as mentioned, hand plane the bow to close-to-flat and follow up with the planer.

-- John

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

620 posts in 1082 days


#13 posted 11-10-2018 01:10 AM

What I’ve done in situations like that was to eyeball the curve and use my Bosch electric hand planer to trim the parts that need trimming in order to get one face a bit flatter. Once I’m closer to flat I take a long straightedge to mark remaining areas needing ‘adjustment’. When I have that face close to flat, then I use the planer with flat face down. If more precision flattening is needed, I’ll set up infeed and outfeed tables on the jointer. Slow process, but it will work. Never did a 10 foot board though. Max so far is 8 feet.

I should mention that I always work the concave face.

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