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View Bill Berklich's profile

Stanley 40 Restoration

by Bill Berklich
posted 11-06-2018 11:38 PM


13 replies so far

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

95 posts in 424 days


#1 posted 11-07-2018 12:50 AM

Bill,
I’ve done a lot of plane totes and knobs… Removing the old finish is tedious… Hand sanding is what I’ve always ended up with. I never use chemical strippers cause I don’t want to damage the wood… With sanding I have the most control. For finishing, I use several coats of Minwax Antique oil. ...sanding with 320 or 400 between coats. I’m usually trying to emulate the original varnish used by Stanley… So how far you go is up to you.

Regards, the Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

966 posts in 952 days


#2 posted 11-07-2018 11:30 AM

KYToolSmith – thanks! I’ve never seen the Minwax Antique Oil, I’ll have to search it out. I’ll post some before and after pics once I get started. I still have some Fall “honey-do’s” to clean up.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

11612 posts in 1702 days


#3 posted 11-07-2018 01:36 PM

I’ll second KY Toolsmith with the sanding approach. I’ve refinished several totes and occasionally I’ll wipe them down with lacquer thinner before I start the hard work but it doesn’t help a lot usually and I don’t soak them in it because I try to preserve the look of the original wood. I like the rolls of sanding strips that are sold for turning. They work well to get inside the curves. I also have some scrapers I use to remove the bulk of the film finish if sanding isn’t getting the job done.

Knobs are much easier. I make a mandrel and chuck ‘em in the drill press and sand ‘em down :-) Here's a blog post I did that covers refinishing the wood bits if interested.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

966 posts in 952 days


#4 posted 11-07-2018 01:48 PM



I ll second KY Toolsmith with the sanding approach.

Knobs are much easier. I make a mandrel and chuck em in the drill press and sand em down :-) Here s a blog post I did that covers refinishing the wood bits if interested.

- HokieKen

Great – thanks for directing me to the blog!

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1535 posts in 2200 days


#5 posted 11-07-2018 09:14 PM

Yep. Sanding and scrapers. It can be slow going but I found that this method works best for me.

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

232 posts in 561 days


#6 posted 11-07-2018 09:46 PM

Bluenote38,
I second the others as far as sanding the tote smooth by hand and I like an oil finish on my planes but its a matter of preference. I use a strip of sand paper to get the rounded edges smooth but you can experiment with what works best for you.

If you have a drill press or a lathe, chuck the knob into it using a screw through the hole. Then sand it as it turns slowly. you can work up in fine grit until you are happy with the finish. The original knobs were manufactured this way so don’t worry about sanding against the grain. You are correct. the original wood was beech.

Also, a #40 is a very sought after collector’s item for some weird reason. They are way over priced on EBAY.

Can we see pictures?

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

966 posts in 952 days


#7 posted 11-08-2018 02:36 PM

It’s actually in pretty good shape. I need to figure out how to sharpen the blade though. I’m a little stumped on the curve.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

11612 posts in 1702 days


#8 posted 11-08-2018 02:44 PM

Free-hand is the best way I’ve figured out for a heavily cambered blade Bill. Unless you use a powered sharpener? The you could make a jig that has a pivot at the center point of the radius of the camber.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

966 posts in 952 days


#9 posted 11-08-2018 02:58 PM

I generally use a Tormek with several jigs. Maybe I can find one that would work? A lot of my sharpening is just clean up/touch up by hand on water stones.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

232 posts in 561 days


#10 posted 11-08-2018 03:31 PM

I’m pretty sure there’s a Stumpy Nubs video on sharpening a rounded plane iron. I do it by hand on a waterstone.

Check out his website. I like the patina that the knob and tote have in your picture. I would consider just putting a coat of tongue oil on it and buffing it smooth. These planes are great for roughing small boards but when I do wide boards, I prefer a #5 or larger. I have a rounded iron for my #7 that works great for diagonal cuts on wide lumber.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

11612 posts in 1702 days


#11 posted 11-08-2018 03:41 PM

Here's an interesting idea from Derek Cohen. Basically just make a wood template with the camber cut on it and use it on your guide bar. He uses a belt sander but I imagine you could make the same idea work with your Tormek? I’m not really familiar with the Tormec though so I can’t say with any confidence ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

232 posts in 561 days


#12 posted 11-08-2018 09:40 PM

Good stuff Hokie, Thanks for the info.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

966 posts in 952 days


#13 posted 11-09-2018 02:19 PM



Good stuff Hokie, Thanks for the info.

- DBDesigns

Ditto!!

-- Bill - Rochester MI

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